Pesty650

Australian education standards

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    Not surprised at the story in the Advertiser - Literacy a problem facing millions of workers | Adelaide Now

     

    I have no idea why people emigrate to Australia for the sake of their kids education. In my time here I have reached the conclusion that education standards are no better than the UK, in fact probably worse. I'm not saying the UK education standards are top of the class , but the ability of many people here, young and old, to perform basic spelling and arithmetic (sums) suggests that SA education has never been that good & still isn't. I have no idea who employs these people when mistakes on resumes are so frequent but I must assume that the employers can't spell either! There really is no excuse either these days with spell check on every PC. Having a degree doesn't make any difference either!

     

    Don't even get me started on history, geography, biology and languages. :arghh:

    Thankfully there are some people who still seem to come through the system with a good all round education.

     

    On the plus side, we bought some goods that had 40% off the $200 marked price, but the full price came up at the till. We of course were expecting to pay $120 so queried it with the assistant. Between her and her manager they agreed that yes it should have 40% off, and charged us $70.

     

    If I had school age kids, I would remain in the UK for the sake of their education!

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    okay i went and read the article mentioned in the original post. The most important statements in the whole of the article were 1) most of these illiterate or poorly educated were typically in labour intensive and low - level service jobs ....(they maybe did not have the education, ability etc or inclination to do anything else) and 2) lower levels of english required for migrants is also a factor. Put these two unremarkable insites together and you will end up with a workforce not being able to understand anything but the simplest directive.

     

    This does not however mean Australian education is substandard within the Western world. It would certainly have different emphases than in other similar countries, but then it is educating its youth for its own perceived needs, not those of another country. There are of course common mistakes made in grammar and yes this is due to less emphasis and time placed for this into the already jampacked curriculum, but this is also seen in many other countries that use English as their major language.

     

    On the whole I believe the Australian education system is a good one that prepares a child to take its place within society whilst having the confidence to know their place in the world. Of course there will always be illiterate people and others who slip through the system, but considering that Australian children become Lawyers, Doctors, Researchers, Entrepreneurs, Managers, Teachers, Jockies, Musicians, ETC ETC....something must be going right, and even the person who decides that all they want to do is work the cash till or pack biscuits can usually read and write adequately to function.

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    Guest Kazzarazza

    I agree. I read the original article, last night, BEFORE the Adelaide Advertiser got hold of it and put their usual overly-exaggerated and controversial slant on it. The vast majority of the 4 million people mentioned were immigrants and their families who nominate English as their SECOND language. It had nothing to do with the Australian education system.

     

    For reasons known only to themselves, the Advertiser continually criticise SA teachers and the education system.

     

    Having a brother who has taught in the UK, SA, NZ and Africa, he puts SA right up at the top.

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    Hi there,

     

    Just to answer your question about why people may bring their children over for the sake of their education....

     

    We didn't make the move just for the sake of our children's education, but obviously this was an area that we looked into in some depth. Our children attended a school in the UK which was rated as Outstanding by OFSTED, and both of them were performing well academically. However, I felt that my children were being suffocated and not allowed to explore their own interests as, in my opinion, the school concentrated more on teaching the subjects on which the children would be tested, with additonal pressure in the years where tests were given. For example, I found it interesting that they were keen to try and teach children more complicated maths before they had mastered the basics. Now I am in no way an expert on teaching or education, but I do know my children. In the very short time they have been attending a school in Australia their enthusiam to learn has returned. They are given more responsibility for their education and encouraged to take an active role in how they study - hosting assemblies, working with buddy classes, special events within the classroom etc. I would agree that they are not bringing home homework every week as they were in the UK, and it did take a while for me to get used to how Australian schools operate, but do not regret our decision to make the move to Australia in any way. My children are both in primary school (8 and 9 years old), so I apreciate I do not have experience with the later school years, but I am a firm believer that if you can catch a child's interest in a topic they will learn. No matter what school or country, there will always be children who come out with lower marks than others, through no fault of the system or the teachers.

     

    As most parents, I am hoping my children come out at the end of their educational years as well rounded adults, happy and confident in themselves, regardless of what career path they choose. As their parents we also accept our responsibility in this and try to make sure we offer them the opportunities to discover new things and put into practice what they have learnt.

     

    Our hope is that the Australian government do not put pressure on schools here as the UK government has done on it's schools and force schools to teach to tests in order for good league table results.

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    I agree with much of what has been said already. But, speaking as a teacher, a little more accountability for learning and progress would go a long way here and help to improve standards. The new myschool website and national curriculum should help in this regard.

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    Has the original poster ever noticed how many spelling mistakes appear on posts on this site - I'm sure none of these posters were educated at schools in Australia!!! Makes you wonder if its the same in the UK - as you say, probably worse.

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    There's good and bad in both countries, and to be honest, the Advertiser is in no position to criticise anyone - their journalism and editorial standards being generally appalling! However, I can only speak for the teenagers and kids I have met here, and have to say that on the whole they are articulate, confident, and able to socialise and hold an intelligent conversation with a wide range of people, from all ages and a variety of cultures. They seem hardworking and keen to succeed. Now I didn't have teenagers in the UK, so perhaps I've had more contact here with them, and perhaps I've had more contact with those from some of the better schools, and none with those from more socially disadvantaged areas, but it's certainly something that made a big impression on me here, and something I didn't ever notice amongst UK teens. I think confidence and social skills are incredibly important in life, and if the Australian school system gives my children that, along with hopefully some qualifications, I'll feel it's a job well done.

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    Has the original poster ever noticed how many spelling mistakes appear on posts on this site - I'm sure none of these posters were educated at schools in Australia!!! Makes you wonder if its the same in the UK - as you say, probably worse.

     

    Sertenly havv :biglaugh:

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    Guest Nick11
    I agree with much of what has been said already. But, speaking as a teacher, a little more accountability for learning and progress would go a long way here and help to improve standards. The new myschool website and national curriculum should help in this regard.

     

    Quite right.

    As a teacher- some of the standards of education here and what passes as acceptable teaching leaves me speechless!!!!

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    Guest soggy
    There's good and bad in both countries, and to be honest, the Advertiser is in no position to criticise anyone - their journalism and editorial standards being generally appalling! However, I can only speak for the teenagers and kids I have met here, and have to say that on the whole they are articulate, confident, and able to socialise and hold an intelligent conversation with a wide range of people, from all ages and a variety of cultures. They seem hardworking and keen to succeed. Now I didn't have teenagers in the UK, so perhaps I've had more contact here with them, and perhaps I've had more contact with those from some of the better schools, and none with those from more socially disadvantaged areas, but it's certainly something that made a big impression on me here, and something I didn't ever notice amongst UK teens. I think confidence and social skills are incredibly important in life, and if the Australian school system gives my children that, along with hopefully some qualifications, I'll feel it's a job well done.

     

    This is more or less what I was going to say, so I don't need to now, I have had many conversations with teens, at the checkout of foodland, in my shop and even waiting for a burger and I still walk away suprised by this as it did not happen much in the UK.

     

    Simon:)

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    Guest Nick11

    Socially kids in oz are way ahead of the kids in the u.k, unfortunately the teaching of the 3Rs is not..however with the advent of the National curriculum..things may be looking up.

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    Socially kids in oz are way ahead of the kids in the u.k, .

     

    That's the job of the parents, not the school, from birth. Too much expectation is placed on teachers and schools in the UK while the parents abstain from all responsibility for developing their child into an all round human being & nobody will develop social skills texting, on the internet or a PlayStation. As interesting as peoples views are on forums such as these, they are no substitute for good old conversation. I'm now sounding like my parents :arghh:

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    Guest soggy
    That's the job of the parents, not the school, from birth. Too much expectation is placed on teachers and schools in the UK while the parents abstain from all responsibility for developing their child into an all round human being & nobody will develop social skills texting, on the internet or a PlayStation. As interesting as peoples views are on forums such as these, they are no substitute for good old conversation. I'm now sounding like my parents :arghh:

     

    Maybe Australian parents are better than British parents then.

     

    Simon

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    Guest smit
    There's good and bad in both countries, and to be honest, the Advertiser is in no position to criticise anyone - their journalism and editorial standards being generally appalling! However, I can only speak for the teenagers and kids I have met here, and have to say that on the whole they are articulate, confident, and able to socialise and hold an intelligent conversation with a wide range of people, from all ages and a variety of cultures. They seem hardworking and keen to succeed. Now I didn't have teenagers in the UK, so perhaps I've had more contact here with them, and perhaps I've had more contact with those from some of the better schools, and none with those from more socially disadvantaged areas, but it's certainly something that made a big impression on me here, and something I didn't ever notice amongst UK teens. I think confidence and social skills are incredibly important in life, and if the Australian school system gives my children that, along with hopefully some qualifications, I'll feel it's a job well done.
    We had teenagers in uk.........and the constant tinkering with the system screwed them both.........new education minister , new system, complete crap........good to say they both have now left and are happy and more confident. That still doesnt say the system is better .....i think you get lucky with teachers sometime.....

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    Guest Nick11
    That's the job of the parents, not the school, from birth. Too much expectation is placed on teachers and schools in the UK while the parents abstain from all responsibility for developing their child into an all round human being & nobody will develop social skills texting, on the internet or a PlayStation. As interesting as peoples views are on forums such as these, they are no substitute for good old conversation. I'm now sounding like my parents :arghh:

     

    Okay let's put it another way ..schools here put a lot more time and effort into helping children become good citizens. Whereas in the u.k they are more focused on academic attainment.

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    Guest Nick11

    i think you get lucky with teachers sometime.....

     

    I have that same experience too..my kids have either had very very good teachers or very very bad teachers. There doesnt seem to be much middle ground.

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    Me too. They'll be applying for visas to come here soon :)

    Yes but they won't get in....its not a doddle scoring band 7 and above in all sections of IELTS required to register as a nurse in Oz, and that is with ~English as 1st language and an 'A' at 'O' level!

    Maybe if UK had similar guidelines country wouldn't be in the state its in!!!??!!:realmad:

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    Guest spongebob

    Hi:jiggy:

     

    I am looking to emigrate to Aus in the near future and am trying to understand the education system.

     

    My children are 9 and 11 so from what I read will be at primary school and won't start high school til year 8 is that right?

     

    On myschools web site it says the schools take Naplan tests, is this like SATS over here?

     

    Someone said on one of the forums that there is a 6 month waiting list. Is that right?

     

    How do I find out which schools have a good name and those that are not so good?

     

    Whats the difference between government and non government. It seems the gap between the two is not as huge as here in the UK. Is that right?

     

    Any advice welcomed.:wubclub:

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