Prema

English /English aussie

    Recommended Posts

    Language barrier.... actually there is a small one, very small though.

     

    I think that people who live in Adelaide have very slight aussie accents, sometimes I can't tell. But I'm told that our accents stick out like a sore thumb....

    Sometimes things are called different names.

     

    Zucchini - Courgettes

    capsicum - salad peppers (red), I asked the lady at pizza hut what it was she looked at me and I knew she was saying to herself are you serious?

    Doona/manchester - duvets

    OG road - this one threw me, I was calling it og road as in one word, but why don't they put dots in between the letters? O.G. Road, then you will know not to sound the whole word only each letter.

    I know there are lots more can't think of them right now.

     

    Do any of you agree that Adelaide is geared to the US, the trucks, houses and roads? I said this to an aussie and she got quite defensive, said that Adelaide was more like a little Britain, I asked her if she had ever been to the UK, she said no!!! what gives.

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    The funniest thing I ever heard was about an English lady, shopping in Target when over the loud speaker came an announcement "Would someone from Manchester please come to the enquiry desk?". Being a helpful type (and from near to Manchester) she went over to see what they wanted - only to find they needed someone to answer a query about bedding!

     

    You'll have to start pronouncing a few words differently now you're here too Prema - parsta (pasta), and rowt (route) and if you ask someone which team they're supporting, you ask who they're barracking for - never who they're rooting for!

     

    I think a lot of things here are very American too - the billboards, and the TV ads for a start.:)

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest Guest5035
    The funniest thing I ever heard was about an English lady, shopping in Target when over the loud speaker came an announcement "Would someone from Manchester please come to the enquiry desk?". Being a helpful type (and from near to Manchester) she went over to see what they wanted - only to find they needed someone to answer a query about bedding!

     

    You'll have to start pronouncing a few words differently now you're here too Prema - parsta (pasta), and rowt (route) and if you ask someone which team they're supporting, you ask who they're barracking for - never who they're rooting for!

     

    I think a lot of things here are very American too - the billboards, and the TV ads for a start.:)

     

    whats rooting di, tell me please................;)

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    whats rooting di, tell me please................;)

     

     

     

    :Randy-git: does this answer your question:biglaugh:

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    I thought that too about OG Road - I still occasionally call it Og Road;)

     

    As for Oz/Adelaide being more similar to the US, I've always thought it had equal elements of both the US and UK, having lived in both places. It's new but it still clings to it's English roots.

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    The funniest thing I ever heard was about an English lady, shopping in Target when over the loud speaker came an announcement "Would someone from Manchester please come to the enquiry desk?". Being a helpful type (and from near to Manchester) she went over to see what they wanted - only to find they needed someone to answer a query about bedding!

     

    :biglaugh::biglaugh::biglaugh:

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest lastboyscout

    I still think Adelaidians talk like cockneys :biglaugh:

     

    You can pick some cockneyisms out when you listen carefully :biglaugh:

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    O.G Road stands for Old German Road. Quite a few names were changed or shortened during WW2.

     

    Millie

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest Roo1
    O.G Road stands for Old German Road. Quite a few names were changed or shortened during WW2.

     

    Millie

     

    Thanks Millie, I was scratching my head about that one. I'm glad someone finally explained! :wubclub:

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    O.G Road stands for Old German Road. Quite a few names were changed or shortened during WW2.

     

    Millie

     

    Actually O.G Road is named after Osmond Gilles, see below

    Osmond Gilles was another founding member of The S.A. Literary Association formed in 1834, and its first treasurer. It was as first Colonial Treasurer that Gilles landed at Holdfast Bay (Glenelg) on the 28th December 1836 from the Buffalo. He remained as Colonial Treasurer until removed from office for incompetence by Governor Gawler in September 1839.

    After his retirement, Gilles entered upon pastoral pursuits, and greatly improved the flocks by importing pure Saxon merinos. He opened the Glen Osmond silver-lead mine, and was a member of the syndicate of five who won the ballot for the township of Glenelg. The first ship built in the Patawalonga in November 1839, a cutter of 22 tons called O.G., was named after him as is the O.G. Road.

    He died in 1866 aged 79 at Glen Osmond, where he had established the well-known Woodley estate.

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest tinkham_lee
    Language barrier.... actually there is a small one, very small though.

     

    I think that people who live in Adelaide have very slight aussie accents, sometimes I can't tell. But I'm told that our accents stick out like a sore thumb....

    Sometimes things are called different names.

     

    Zucchini - Courgettes

    capsicum - salad peppers (red), I asked the lady at pizza hut what it was she looked at me and I knew she was saying to herself are you serious?

    Doona/manchester - duvets

    OG road - this one threw me, I was calling it og road as in one word, but why don't they put dots in between the letters? O.G. Road, then you will know not to sound the whole word only each letter.

    I know there are lots more can't think of them right now.

     

    Do any of you agree that Adelaide is geared to the US, the trucks, houses and roads? I said this to an aussie and she got quite defensive, said that Adelaide was more like a little Britain, I asked her if she had ever been to the UK, she said no!!! what gives.

     

    Different words, I think this is probably the worst one.

    Thongs - Flip flops, this has put some bad images in my head quite a few times.

     

    Yes I agree, very similar to the US and nothing like britain.

    roads set out as grids in the suburbs. so easy to navigate

    big houses

    big trucks

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest JandJ

    Some more for you:-

     

    Database - Dartabase

    Genuine - Genuwhine

    Beer - Grog

     

    Too easy!

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest Tina

    the colour or should i say color ... maroon they say marone... whats this all about?

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    My favourite is the two syllable "show-un" (shown) and "grow-un" (grown) - not sure if this is a particularly South Aussie thing or the whole of Australia. I like the way they use 'not' at the end of a sentence too - "we wanted to go to the football, it was raining but"

     

    The South Australian accent is much nicer (imho) than the NSW or Queensland one though, much more subtle I think and easier on the ear.

     

    And you're really not a true Aussie until you can end your sentences with ".....yeeehhhh"

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Went to get a stamp the other day to send a letter. Couldn't make myself understood to the shop assistant though. I asked for a stamp & got blank looks.

    I said "a stamp please" again. Nope nothing.

    "What's it for" she said?

    "To put on a letter to send in the mail" I said

    "Oh" she said, "a staiiiiiyyyyyymp" in a Kylie kind of way

    I should be so lucky

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest Jersey Bean

    These post are funny as cant wait to make complete \you know wht of my self! ha ha

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest panther
    I said that to my wife in 1995 when we came here this is like America only 20 years behind.

    I hope we never get like America

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest sarahsmartiepants

     

    And you're really not a true Aussie until you can end your sentences with ".....yeeehhhh"

    AND start the sentence with "yeah no..." OR "Ah look..."

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    i still cant believe after nearly 2 years the aussies cant understand me...i mean come on im from manchester!! :jiggy: I speak the queens english!! I cant count how many times ives had to spell clare , ive had clear klar, klur, lire lol, and then they go...oh calierre!! Why didnt you sayeee doh :biglaugh: .

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest cornish Busdriver

    Gotta admit i find the aussies language no probs at all, i understand them and they understand me no-worries.

    Just gets a bit anoying when they say "you sound weired, say it again" must be the Cornish accent thingy and the way most things end in AYE. Pretty good aye, not bad aye, you had a blowout then aye lol lol lol.

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest Guest75

    :biglaugh:

     

    All the accents from the U do amaze the Aussies.

     

    My Aussie mates try and copy my broad Yorkshire accent - it just sounds so wrong.

     

    Most locals think that most Northern wives are called Alice...................we are actually saying "Our lass":biglaugh:

     

    A few Aussieisms are creeping in with me - I can say Arvo without flinching now.!

     

    Cannot bring myself to say "G'Day" though - sounds wrong.

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Create an account or sign in to comment

    You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

    Create an account

    Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

    Register a new account

    Sign in

    Already have an account? Sign in here.

    Sign In Now