Guest M_M

primary schools for the gifted

    Recommended Posts

    Guest M_M

    Does anyone have experience with South Australian schools with gifted kids? unsure.gif

    (young kids 7 and 5 years old.)

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest M_M

    I did find that list, but it's four years old, is there a more recent list?

     

    Why Linden Park Primary school?

     

    And isn't a SHIP programe required for all primary schools?

     

    And if not is there a list of all primary schools who have a SHIP programe?

     

    (Sorry for all the questions, we really want a good school for our boys before we go. :unsure:)

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Hi,

     

    Perhaps you could try this website?

     

    GTCASA Official Web Site

     

    Or this one for general policy info:

     

    http://www.decs.sa.gov.au/docs/documents/1/GiftedChildrenandStudents.pdf

     

    My daughter was a SHIP student, went to The Hub Primary where she was well looked after. She has since completed her high school ed with IGNITE - the high school equivalent of SHIP. She's had plenty of opportunities and I wouldn't worry about your kids....just find a school that 'feels' right and ask them how they approach the whole SHIP thing. I'd relax :) as I see no reason why your kids will not be catered for. We have a fair few bright kids in SA lol!

     

    :wubclub: LC

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Most good schools will be able to cater for the SHIP student. Linden Park was one of the pilot schools for the programme(my children went here) and a lot of the kids go onto Glenunga International High which has two IGNITE classes for entry at yr 8 level. Some schools will advance students, others prefer to keep them with their age peers but broaden their schoolwork to meet their particular needs. Your children wont be bored as the emphasis on early education here is not just on academics and there is a lot of social education that goes on. Also children begin a language when they start school. I agree with Lazy Cow, look at schools when you come to find what suits you and your children.

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    When you say 'gifted' do you mean that they are very clever or that they have been assessed as 'gifted' and therefore have the associated behavioural traits that characterise these special children because I believe there are 2 different answers to this question. I have 2 boys, 10 and 5 and they both fall into the second category so if this is the case I can give you more of an insight into education for these kids, if its the 1st answer then I agree with the previous responses, look at SHIP and IGNITE. Apologies for the quick response, off to school so need to get going. Please PM me if you would like to and I can expand on our experience out here, my oldest son was 7 when he entered the education system here having completed year 2 in England. All the best Joanne

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest M_M

    Thanks for all the info!!

     

    @ richjop: my oldest son is tested with an IQ of >150.

    Crashed 4 times in school and has homeschool now.

    Our jongest has his test this week.

    But the tester said:

    "If he isn't above 130, you'll get your money back, because I did a bad job." :biglaugh:

    So I really want to take you up on that offer!!

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest smit

    when you get here , you will soon realize that schooling here is one of the biggest differeences from Uk. They are taught totally different.........its not rammed down thier throats..........not until yr 10 11 and 12.

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest smit

    please bear in mind tho...........that you will probably think that your kids arent being taught enough( coming from the uk system)......many newbies with young kids do.

     

    My kids were to old for the ignite program, but were in classes with people that were..........good thing educationally..........but socially......open to debate.

     

     

    Oh and you will soon get used to schoolkids.....even teenagers .:goofy:having conversations with you when they visit your home...........this is the social part of aus education that is done in early years that bears fruit later

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    please bear in mind tho...........that you will probably think that your kids arent being taught enough( coming from the uk system)......many newbies with young kids do.

     

    My kids were to old for the ignite program, but were in classes with people that were..........good thing educationally..........but socially......open to debate.

     

     

    Oh and you will soon get used to schoolkids.....even teenagers .:goofy:having conversations with you when they visit your home...........this is the social part of aus education that is done in early years that bears fruit later

     

    Top comments...couldnt agree more!:jiggy:

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    My kids were to old for the ignite program, but were in classes with people that were..........good thing educationally..........but socially......open to debate.

     

     

    Ok Smit...I've got to know lol...why do you think that socially, IGNITE kids can suffer? I promise I'm not looking for an argument and I apologise if this is a tad off topic BUT...?

     

    :) LC

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest M_M

    not off topic at all!! I want to know all about the schools in SA. :cute:

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    its because some of the ignite kids have been hothoused and know it and worry about who got what marks in the Uni NSW competitions and who got the medal for the state blah blah, this is more at yrs 8 and 9 though. Also some of them have a hard time when the "norms" catch up just through age and can read at same level and do maths too etc... n they appear to be no longer little genius kids. Of course there are a lot of very grounded kids out there too. My mum took me to one of the G and T sessions they used to run on a sat and i said never again.......

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest smit
    Ok Smit...I've got to know lol...why do you think that socially, IGNITE kids can suffer? I promise I'm not looking for an argument and I apologise if this is a tad off topic BUT...?

     

    :) LC

    If they get advanced a school year educationally, doesnt mean they have advanced a year socially. They are with people a year older, who can do things that they cant..........at paticular times...

     

    Im all for bright kids getting extra /different work, but should be still in the same year group......... maybe this does happen , hey LC you could enlighten me........im no expert .:)

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest M_M

    In our experiance it does mean they have advanced a year socially. :cute:

    It's just their classmates don't accept that kind of behaviour from a kid his age.

    My son is almost 6 years old and is tested on social skills.

    He finished the test and that normaly means your 12 years old.

     

    It's accepted for a 12 year old to give a four year old a pat on the head when she hurt herself.

    If an 6 year old boy does that, they begin screaming!! :arghh:

    But it's normal behaviour for his "mind age"

    So he is asked to underachieve socially 5 days a week in school and that's to hard for a 6 year old boy. So he actes out....:jimlad:

    That's why we're looking for a school that let's him skip classes. :o

    (Searching the internet, there are a lot of schools in and around Adelaide who "get it" )

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    There is quite a strong focus on sports and physical activities here as well. For instance in Year 7 (last year of Primary school here) there are lots of school "carnivals" in various sports and it's all done by year of birth, so if your child is born a year (or more) later than his class mates, he'll not be able to get involved with them in those, and higher up the years, where the school sport is by year group, he/she will find themselves at a disadvantage in teams as they'll be physically that much smaller/slower than their class/team-mates. As time goes by, they'll get to Year 10/11 and all their classmates will be starting to learn to drive, and they won't be able to yet, then later their classmates will be allowed into clubs, and they won't....

     

    One year up wouldn't be too bad, but any more than that and I'd worry I'd be setting a child up to a fairly friendless existence!

     

    Perhaps try and find a school where they have mixed age classes, so when your child is in Year 1 they are in a a 1/2 class, when in Year 2 they are in a 2/3 class and so on. That way they can make friends their own age, but still have work set that is a little more challenging.

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest me123

    Hi i read this thread with great interest and as a parent myself i fully understand your concerns...moving here is going to be a massive change for all your family and to be honest i think you have to be here for a good while before you understand the education system..at first you will be shocked at the differences to the uk school system....but there is deffinately support there for specialised schooling if this is your childs needs...kids here are a very big part of australian life style (IF YOU HAVE THEM)they are included in all aspects of life ..you will enjoy this once you get used to it...your kids will have all on adapting to their new life here and maybe it would be better to just get them into a school and see how things are before you stress too much....kids here actually enjoy engaging in conversation with adults ..this will seem a little strange at first....they seem leaps a head here in social skills....even if you think that they maybe behind in schooling ability...you have very young children so plenty of time to adjust and get it right for you and your kids....chill a little you'll have ball...good luck

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest needtogonow

    Totally agree with some of the comments ref IGNITE. Interesting reading as we have only been here for three months and my daughter has been placed in this programme a year ahead her normal year group. Still open to debate as to whether moving children into higher year groups are a good idea or if accerlerated learning in their normal year groups are more beneficial.

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    My oldest son, Ben, was 7 when we came to Australia in July 2007. His birthday is in May and so he had completed Year 2 in England. The school we moved to have a cut off of end of April so he was offered a place in Year 1, half way through term 3. We were a little unsure about this because he was so far ahead of his UK classmates, how would the kids react and how would he be socially? Its been the best move we ever made. Its a massive emotional upheaval to move schools and he needed a bit of time to settle in. In the UK he didn't really have role in the class, youngest but cleverest didn't sit too well together and so didn't really have many friends. Now he is oldest, cleverest, tallest, an asset on sporting teams and the one that his classmates look to for advice etc. We were offered the option of skipping a year after completing year 1 and didn't even consider it. One thing that we have found is that he doesn't like being 'different' so extension in the class suits him well, he sometimes 'dumbs' down but the teachers are fully aware of this and will push him without him realising it. I agree with things like the driving, sports etc, it would have been very difficult for him to accept his friends doing things so much earlier than him. Schooling was the most important consideration for us when we moved over and hopefully all the advice people have given here is in some way putting your mind at rest. It is such a different system over here and as someone says it takes a bit of getting used to. All the best Joanne

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    There is quite a strong focus on sports and physical activities here as well. For instance in Year 7 (last year of Primary school here) there are lots of school "carnivals" in various sports and it's all done by year of birth, so if your child is born a year (or more) later than his class mates, he'll not be able to get involved with them in those, and higher up the years, where the school sport is by year group, he/she will find themselves at a disadvantage in teams as they'll be physically that much smaller/slower than their class/team-mates. As time goes by, they'll get to Year 10/11 and all their classmates will be starting to learn to drive, and they won't be able to yet, then later their classmates will be allowed into clubs, and they won't....

     

    One year up wouldn't be too bad, but any more than that and I'd worry I'd be setting a child up to a fairly friendless existence!

     

    Perhaps try and find a school where they have mixed age classes, so when your child is in Year 1 they are in a a 1/2 class, when in Year 2 they are in a 2/3 class and so on. That way they can make friends their own age, but still have work set that is a little more challenging.

     

     

    i agree with Diane...just be a tad careful as it will be very difficult for the kids socially and in other things....as they get older.

     

    My son is a year 5 student in a Year 5/6 class...it has always been the case that he has been in a mixed class with children of a higher level. This enables him to still mix with kids of his own age, but at the same time, do the work assigned to the year above...

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    If they get advanced a school year educationally, doesnt mean they have advanced a year socially. They are with people a year older, who can do things that they cant..........at paticular times...

     

    Im all for bright kids getting extra /different work, but should be still in the same year group......... maybe this does happen , hey LC you could enlighten me........im no expert .

     

    Lol! Me neither Smit!

     

    I only have my own experience; I can't speak for all of the IGNITE schools or all the IGNITE students (that's my back-down clause :)!)

     

    Anyway,one of my children was a SHIP at primary and is now completing Year 12 IGNITE at APHS. The other is mainstream and also at APHS.

     

    IGNITE students do learn differently to mainstream at APHS. Their behaviour tends to be more argumentative, lively, quicker to grasp concepts and more eager to actually do the work! They actually have an almost inbuilt need to go that bit further in their studies and it is quite an eye-opener to see how much work they get done in one class.

     

    Year 8/9 IGNITE at APHS is pretty much the same as for any Year8/9, They stay with their homegroup for most of the subjects, only mingling with mainstream for tec/art/p.e. etc. Their work though is extended so ideas from higher years may be included. In later years, they have had (and this is always subject to changes in the program) the opportunity to complete their studies earlier - ie.take Year 11 SACE subjects whilst in Year 10 and Year 12 in Year 11. Kids can complete their SACE and achieve their TER score, and leave school early to go on to uni etc.

     

    I agree with Rachie that kids can be 'hothoused' for IGNITE but I think parents who do that are on a slippery path and probably don't fully 'get' the system. Kids who do not pass the IGNITE tests can still be picked up later in their school life and put into IGNITE classes for one, or all, of their subjects. Equally, IGNITE kids who are not happy or not achieving can leave the program and join the mainstream.

     

    Socially, kids seem to pick up friends from wherever - old schools, sports clubs,church groups, special interest, the BMX track, skate park, work etc. I don't think kids necessarily just hang with their homegroup so I don't understand why people would think IGNITE kids are any different? Mind you, I know some IGNITE kids whoare very proud of the fact they are IGNITE and seem a bit up themselves - but equally I know a few mainstream that are exactly the same lol. Perhaps down to the child rather than their homegroup?

     

    As for age...that's up to the parents, the school and the kid. Schools here have a more sensible approach to age and even mainstream kids can be in a year above - or below (usually if they fail their core subjects and have to re-do a year) their age cohort. So it's not confined to IGNITE or SHIP.

     

    The sports thing can majorly suck for kids but it's not just schools or SAPSASA, it extends into after-school clubs..which can be a blow! I know it was for my son who, after playing footy at SAPSASA, lost the will to play this year 'cos he's had to move up a team year, feels out of his league with the bigger kids and doesn't particularly like many of them lol. Just as with school, I guess this can be a positive for some kids, but not mine :(. Oh well, such is life!

     

    OK....that's about it for me! Sorry if I've rambled on! I can back up everything I've written but I would never claim to be an expert! Probably like most people, I know a bit about what affects me or my family.

     

    :wubclub: LC

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Agree with all you said LC . My daughter was accepted into the IGNITE at Glenunga and would have completed yr 8 and 9 in one year, having been put into the acceleration class rather than the extension class that does both yr 8 and 9 as seperate years. However we decided to take up her dance scholarship instead somewhere else and frankly I'm glad as the stress of yr 11 on her 16 yr old self is enough, never mind having to do yr 12 this yr instead. My own experience of skipping yr 6 all together and going into yr 8 from yr 6 was ok, but going to uni at 16, although doable was not the experience it could have been. I probably would have got a bit more out of it if I had been older. My anthropology 1st yr tute was full of confident 40 yr olds willing to discuss at the drop of a hat, whereas I would sit there hoping they wouldnt ask me anything. Haha now I would be one of those annoying 40 yr olds banging away to the sound of my own voice. Also when everyone else was beginning to hit the pubs and clubs I was still way too young and was a bit isolated. However each child is different and I was a very young 16 year old anyway. The hot housing I referred to is a result of the parent who receives the news that their child is advanced/ gifted / talented and as well as providing ample time for the nurturing of this also lets the child know that they are 'special' and they should not be allowed to be bored, have to do what the other kids are doing etc. The best example of parents not doing this are my daughter's friends parents. This girl was no 3 in the state for the Ignite tests for their yr, she was told all along she had the ability so use it , but also she was just lucky, not better etc. She actually hated being labelled "smart" by her peers. Her parents didn't make out it was extaordinary that she was doing yr 11 maths in yr 6, it was just where she was at. There are also cramming tutors for these Ignite tests, practicing the kinds of things they would be expected to do. Waiting for my daughter to finish her Ignite tests I got the chance to people watch. There were a lot of stressed parents there and when the kids came out there was a lot of grilling going on. I just think that kids have their whole lifetime ahead of them and that especially in primary school, if they are very able academically, it means they finish their work quickly and so have lots of time to pursue other things like music, sport and other interests to keep them well rounded people. Remember the hoohaa about that girl Ruth who went to do maths at Oxford age 10, well I think that was a complete waste of a childhood and she should have just gone to school and learnt to be normal LOL. If smart kids are bored they should use their brains and find something to do and the teacher can also expect more depth, broader discussion etc from them. I would be looking for a school that did this in the classroom. I also think boys do it harder later if they accelerate school years as puberty hits.

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest smit
    Agree with all you said LC . My daughter was accepted into the IGNITE at Glenunga and would have completed yr 8 and 9 in one year, having been put into the acceleration class rather than the extension class that does both yr 8 and 9 as seperate years. However we decided to take up her dance scholarship instead somewhere else and frankly I'm glad as the stress of yr 11 on her 16 yr old self is enough, never mind having to do yr 12 this yr instead. My own experience of skipping yr 6 all together and going into yr 8 from yr 6 was ok, but going to uni at 16, although doable was not the experience it could have been. I probably would have got a bit more out of it if I had been older. My anthropology 1st yr tute was full of confident 40 yr olds willing to discuss at the drop of a hat, whereas I would sit there hoping they wouldnt ask me anything. Haha now I would be one of those annoying 40 yr olds banging away to the sound of my own voice. Also when everyone else was beginning to hit the pubs and clubs I was still way too young and was a bit isolated. However each child is different and I was a very young 16 year old anyway. The hot housing I referred to is a result of the parent who receives the news that their child is advanced/ gifted / talented and as well as providing ample time for the nurturing of this also lets the child know that they are 'special' and they should not be allowed to be bored, have to do what the other kids are doing etc. The best example of parents not doing this are my daughter's friends parents. This girl was no 3 in the state for the Ignite tests for their yr, she was told all along she had the ability so use it , but also she was just lucky, not better etc. She actually hated being labelled "smart" by her peers. Her parents didn't make out it was extaordinary that she was doing yr 11 maths in yr 6, it was just where she was at. There are also cramming tutors for these Ignite tests, practicing the kinds of things they would be expected to do. Waiting for my daughter to finish her Ignite tests I got the chance to people watch. There were a lot of stressed parents there and when the kids came out there was a lot of grilling going on. I just think that kids have their whole lifetime ahead of them and that especially in primary school, if they are very able academically, it means they finish their work quickly and so have lots of time to pursue other things like music, sport and other interests to keep them well rounded people. Remember the hoohaa about that girl Ruth who went to do maths at Oxford age 10, well I think that was a complete waste of a childhood and she should have just gone to school and learnt to be normal LOL. If smart kids are bored they should use their brains and find something to do and the teacher can also expect more depth, broader discussion etc from them. I would be looking for a school that did this in the classroom. I also think boys do it harder later if they accelerate school years as puberty hits.

    Ruth Elke Lawrence (born August 2, 1971) is an Associate Professor of mathematics at the Einstein Institute of Mathematics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and a researcher in knot theory and algebraic topology.Outside of academic circles, she is best known for being a child prodigy.

     

    Ruth was born in Huddersfield, England.

    ...

    When Ruth was five, her father gave up his job so that he could educate her at home.

     

    At the age of eight, Ruth passed the O-level exam in mathematics, which was an age record at the time.At the age of nine she achieved a Grade A at A-level Pure Mathematics, an age record which still stands.In 1981 she passed the Oxford interview entrance examination in mathematics, coming first out of all 530 candidates sitting the examination for St Hugh's College, Oxford, and joining at the age of eleven.

     

    At Oxford, her father continued to be actively involved in her education, accompanying her to all lectures and tutorials.Ruth completed her bachelor's degree in two years, instead of the normal three, and graduated in 1985 at the age of 13 with a starred first and special commendation.Attracting considerable press interest, she became the youngest British person to gain a first-class degree, and the youngest to graduate from the University of Oxford in modern times.

     

    Ruth followed her first degree with a second degree in physics in 1986 and a DPhil in mathematics at Oxford in 1989.

    ...

    Ruth's first academic post was at Harvard University, where she became a Junior Fellow in 1990 at the age of 19.In 1993, Ruth moved to the University of Michigan, where she became an Associate Professor with tenure in 1997.In 1999 Ruth emigrated to Jerusalem and took up the post of Associate Professor at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

     

    In 1998, Ruth married the Israeli mathematician Ariyeh Neimark and changed her name to Ruth Lawrence-Neimark.

    ...

    Ruth Lawrence at the Mathematics Genealogy Project

    ...

    Ruth Lawrence's home page at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem 1985: Teenage genius gets a first from the BBC CopyrightsRuth Lawrence from W,kipedia. ,2006 by W,kipedia.Licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.

    website.png www.vailtrail.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080102/V - [Cached Version]

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Create an account or sign in to comment

    You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

    Create an account

    Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

    Register a new account

    Sign in

    Already have an account? Sign in here.

    Sign In Now