Guest Nomoreengland

Wierd Bicycle laws

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    Guest Nomoreengland

    The other day I decided to buy a cheap mountain bike from K-mart to get around on. When buying the bike the shop assistant said to me "do you want to buy a helmet"? I said no as I never wear them, and he was going on about its against the law not to and you get fined if caught??

     

    Whilst I can see it is safer to wear one, I now look ridicolous riding round my cheap mountain bike with one of these stupid looking helmets - at the end of the day I only pop the shop or the pub to save a taxi on it.

     

    ALSO, I was having a few beers down the pub last night and as I was about to leave, one of the bar staff said to me that I was over the limit and I should leave my bike and collect it in the morning. I thought he was joking at first, but he reckons police over here in South Australia breathalise people on bicycles??!! Whilst I would NEVER drive a car whilst drinking, surely if I pop home on my bike (keeping to the pavement) then Im causing no harm? If I really have to wear a helmet AND cant ride my bike after a few swift beers then I think its a little far fetched dont you?

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    Guest joolz

    I know what you are saying re: looking daft in the helmet...we never had them in the UK but we are going to get them here as we noticed everyone wears them, so we will all look like prats lol!!!

     

    I think that even in the UK you can get done for riding a bike drunk...I'm sure I've heard that somewhere...if you think about it you are a danger to other traffic if your all over the place:oon your push bike...

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    Guest The Dimmocks

    You not having much luck, in your short time in SA you have had a few disagreements with one person or another. Hows your garden doing with all this rainy weather? :D

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    Guest Nomoreengland

    Joozl - when I ride my bike after a few too many I always stick to the pavement so its safe. Ive never come across anyone being breathalised on a bicyle in England before.

     

    Dimmocks - thanks for your interest in my garden. Yes, its pretty drenched thanks.

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    Guest Guest75

    Both are good laws.

     

    You know how dangerous it is on the roads for cyclists.

    Think of your family man if not yourself!

     

    Yep - over the limit and you become a danger not only to yourself but others -selfish again.

     

    :policeman::policeman::policeman:

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    Guest Tina

    is it legal to ride on the pavement if there are cycle lanes on that stretch of road?, if so, i would prefer to use the pavements instead of risking these roads sometimes...

     

    plus i heard you can actually lose your driving license if found to be drunk in the charge of a bicycle... madness..don't know if that is true or how many times you have to get caught though.. bit harsh i thought......we thought about doing a wine tour on bikes and using the cycle lanes (the ones away from roads).. but thought against it in case we get caught a bit tipsy...

     

    but i do agree with the helmet.. it may look stupid but it could save your life...and if everyone wears them then you all look stupid...

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    helmet laws have been in place for 20 odd years here, in that time death from brain injury to bike riders has dropped significantly, especially for kids. It is illegal to ride on the pavement if you are over 12 but police will nearly always turn a blind eye unless you are being a nuisance.

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    Guest joolz
    Joozl - when I ride my bike after a few too many I always stick to the pavement so its safe. Ive never come across anyone being breathalised on a bicyle in England before.

     

    Dimmocks - thanks for your interest in my garden. Yes, its pretty drenched thanks.

     

    Just looked it up on http://www.camdencyclist.org.uk under Drinking and Cycling, you won't be breathalised but you can be fined in the UK...

     

    Even on the path you could still have a accident with a car coming off a driveway or a pedestrian...these laws are only made to protect you.

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    is it legal to ride on the pavement if there are cycle lanes on that stretch of road?, if so, i would prefer to use the pavements instead of risking these roads sometimes....

     

    No it's not, unless you're under 12, as I'm sure the OP realises totally which is why he/she mentioned it!

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    :biglaugh: come on guys, you know this is a wind up right?

     

    Although to be honest the OP of these s**t stirring posts always brings up subjects that can raise a worthwhile discussion!

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    Winding up or otherwise, if you do ride a bicycle its probably best to be aware of your responsibilities and the following guide is helpful http://www.sa.gov.au/upload/franchise/Transport,%20travel%20and%20motoring/Cycling/Cycling%20and%20the%20Law%20Booklet__web_.pdf and by the way

    It is both dangerous and against the law to

    ride a bicycle or any other vehicle, ‘under the

    influence’ of intoxicating liquor or a drug. This

    is a criminal offence, and upon conviction

    you will be fined and will consequently have a

    criminal record. You will also lose six demerit

    points from your driver’s licence or learner’s

    permit, potentially losing your licence. If you

    do not hold a driver’s licence you will still incur

    demerit points which can prohibit you from

    obtaining a licence in the future.

    You can be fined or convicted for driving under the influence

    regardless of whether you are over or under the 0.05 blood

    alcohol concentration level. This is particularly the case if you are

    so affected by any amount of intoxicating liquor or a drug that you

    are incapable of exercising effective control of your bicycle.

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    Just thought I could let you know that being a very keen mountain biker in the UK, that I also had never worn a cycle helmet & considered myself to macho to do so & would look a prize dick head if I did, until I decide with my 4 other friends to cycle the London Bridge ride (TEAM SPINNING)for the stroke association, we ended up cycling 41 miles that day or 65km, & was recommended by my fellow riders to wear a cycle helmet as this was quite a dangerous ride to under take, so I did as it turns out we complected our ride in the British summer of 32 degrees, raising £1,250.00 for the charity & with out a shadow of doubt that the cycle helmet saved me from getting heat stroke, it actually creates air flow over your head keeping you cool, so in the S.A summer I think this is a great piece of equipment.

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    go and spend a day in the head injury clinic and see if wearing a helmet is not a good idea..

    If that's all you have to moan about... I can see where we get the label from..

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    Guest Guest75

    Perhaps we should ask the OP what they actually like about Adelaide, it must be a much shorter list!!:biglaugh::biglaugh:

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    Guest Nomoreengland

    Like I said, I only use my bicycle to get to the local shop (2 mins away) and the pub (approx 1000 yards) and I stick to the pavement so Im not sure its too dangerous if I dont wear a helmet. You could argue that any joggers running on the pavement are also at the same risk of falling over or being mowed over by a car- should they too have to wear a helmet?

     

    Also, my main gripe is the fact that you can apparently get breathalised on a bicycle? I always thought I was being a good citizen back in the UK by riding my Bicycle home on the pavement late at night from the pub rather than using my car (which I never wold do).

     

    Tyke- yes there are positive things about Adelaide im sure. Ive only been here about 4 weeks so all Im simply doing is trying to understand different laws in South Australia. Im just simply trying to understand the differents laws/rules over here and just because ive migrated here I dont have to like all of them.

    gl

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    Guest katsmajic

    Did you know your not allowed to ride a horse under the influence either!? :policeman:

    I got breatho'd on a boxing day morning whilst out on a hack, in uk about 15yrs ago.

     

    My 'strange' uncle has been fined for riding a bike under the influence - they pulled him for riding on the pavement, then breatho'd him....about 12 yrs ago in uk....

     

    I love the law that says you have to wear a helmet - my kids cant argue the fact here that it messes their hair/not cool etc...

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    Just to clarify an answer to the original question:

     

    You MUST wear a helmet when riding a bicycle. A child under the age of 12 must wear a helmet, if they don't the parents may be liable to a fine.

     

    You are NOT allowed to ride on the footpath, this may incur a fine. Unless under 12 and/or supervising a child under 12.

     

    You are not allowed to ride across a pedestrian crossing, again may incur a fine.

     

    Exactly the same as in the UK, you can be prosecuted for being drunk in charge of a pedal cycle.

     

    I think the laws over here are quite fair in regard to cyclist's really, doesn't it annoy you when a cyclist on the road, suddenly mounts the footpath, goes around the red light then rejoins the roadway!!

     

    Also, you must have a bell or warning device attached to your bike, and a light attached back and front when cycling at night.

     

    Hope this answers the question.

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    you cannot be breathalised for riding a bicycle but you can be done for driving under the influence. This is done on the observations of the police officer and not by a breathaliser. breathalisers are for motor vehicles. you can be done for P.C.A (perscribed content of alcohol) and D.U.I (drive under the influence) in a car!

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    Like I said, I only use my bicycle to get to the local shop (2 mins away) and the pub (approx 1000 yards) and I stick to the pavement so Im not sure its too dangerous if I dont wear a helmet. gl

     

     

    Must be a wind up. If your that worried about it, and that close walk. Just out of curiosity, any closer to the airport, cos if you dont like the laws, you'll find plenty airplanes that are going somewhere else. Good Aussie saying, if you dont likre it, leave.

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    Guest Guest75
    Must be a wind up. If your that worried about it, and that close walk. Just out of curiosity, any closer to the airport, cos if you dont like the laws, you'll find plenty airplanes that are going somewhere else. Good Aussie saying, if you dont likre it, leave.

     

     

    :biglaugh:

     

    The sticker I see regularly on good old Sandman motors uses the initials..... FOWAF;);)

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