Guest ganders

Tax Credits

    Recommended Posts

    Guest ganders

    Hello,

     

    I am a teacher from the UK, but am currently working at an international school in Vietnam. I have a wife, 4 year old and a 3 month old and we are considering moving to Australia when my contract finishes here in July 2011.

     

    As a teacher, my salary isn't that great and I was just wondering if tax credits are available in Australia, similar to the UK? I'm just wondering whether or not we could afford to live off a teaching salary in Adelaide (I only have 3 years experience, so still at the bottom end of the pay scale) off one income, or would it be better to wait until my youngest child is at school them my wife could also work?

     

    I have no savings and am worried I wont be able to save enough for a deposit on a house, etc.

     

    Thanks,

     

    Graham

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest guest3462

    A tricky question but without doubt if you have no finaces behind you, you will struggle in the beginning, but many people do come here with little or no savings and manage quite ably. You will only be entitled to any benefits if you have a permenant residency visa same with child care costs so that is a big thing to consider and if you come down the state sponsorship route the dept sa immi will want to know exactly how much money you have and how you will intend to support your family once you arrive. Lots of teachers here find it difficult to secure full time work and end up temping on a supply contract and will have to find work outside of their profession to supplement the income. Cost of living is more than on the uk and I would guess definately more than in Vietnam!

    Please don't think I'm trying to scare you off cos I'm not, I wish you all the very best in whatever you decide to do.

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest ganders

    Cheers - I was in Australia last week for the frist time and was shocked at the price of things (food, groceries, etc.) compared to the UK. I'm trying to decide whether to return to the UK, or to head for Australia. I think Australia would be a better life for the kids, but I don't want to get there and be struggling for money.

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Cheers - I was in Australia last week for the frist time and was shocked at the price of things (food, groceries, etc.) compared to the UK. I'm trying to decide whether to return to the UK, or to head for Australia. I think Australia would be a better life for the kids, but I don't want to get there and be struggling for money.

     

    Hi I am a one wage family i work in health and have a wife and very young daughter, just to add balance to convo, we actualy find it cheaper here, we dont spend as much on weekly groceries and so far bills have been cheaper too. We are just buying our first house and this is defo more expensive than we would have payed in uk, but its just a given here that a bigger percentage of wages goes on the house, we just have to adapt.

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest Mark Xpnsit

    I think you are wise to do your research first and come to Australia should have given you an idea if this is where you want to be. You will get your visa ganted in part based on your ability to support yourself and your family incase your can't get a job.

     

    I'm sure there are some teachers here who could give you info on salary, but Australia is getting more expensive for things like electric and groceries.

     

    Plenty of people come here without much money and survive but it might be worth looking at your options for savings before you come.

     

    Also if you do decide to come directly from Vietnam, you'll need to get your medical done. I actually had mine do in Hanoi, Vietnam. There was only 1 Doctor registered with Australian Immigration but it cost about 1/4 of the price of getting it done in the UK!

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest fredhargreaves

    It's a similar idea but it's done differently here.

     

    Have a look around this site: Family Assistance Office | Welcome to the Family Assistance Office website for more info.

     

    I think your bigger issue might be employment as a teacher.

     

    Government schools are run by each state as part of the public service and unlike in the UK, you don't apply to the individual school for a job. You apply to the department and they post you somewhere. A high proportion of new teachers spend years working as "contract teachers" with no security (difficult to get a mortgage too). The education departments are always under pressure to staff schools in remote areas so if you see yourself doing it long term that's a possible way in.

     

    A lot depends on what subjects you offer. In general there has been an oversupply of teachers in Australia for a while now (not so much in maths and to a lesser extent science), but it is tipped to ease as a large tranche of baby-boomer-aged teachers are reaching retirment at the same time. This may also affect your visa prospects.

     

    If you have another trade besides teaching that may help you to get in.

     

    Independent schools are generally independently run - the Catholic schools have a "system" but generally (In SA at least) the schools do their own recruiting (for permanent jobs at least).

     

    Private education is much more common here than in the UK although there are fewer academically elite schools with entrance exams and such like. Here elite means lots of money and well connected. Nearly all the private schools are run by the churches. Generally the top posh ones are only notionally more religious than a state school. At a broader level the others will often only recruit you if you are generally in agreement with their faith (or they are desperate).

     

    As a trade teaching here is in a similar state to the UK. Widespread poor discipline, dumbing down, teachers treated like units of production by ever-growing "management teams", but there are also plenty of exceptions.

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Create an account or sign in to comment

    You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

    Create an account

    Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

    Register a new account

    Sign in

    Already have an account? Sign in here.

    Sign In Now