Guest Adelaide_bound

Pregnany and childbirth

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    Guest Adelaide_bound

    Hello all :D

     

    First post, please be gentle! :) Have done a search on this topic, but most of the things i have found have been a couple of years old, so wondered if anyone could give an update, or if things haven't changed at all?

     

    I have been researching and have read the following, so wondered if people could confirm/deny/add further info at all pretty please?

     

    a) The father is not allowed at the birth in Australia at the moment (ie like in the UK x years ago)?

    b) Are all 'normal' pregnancy/birth costs still covered by Medicare? Including stay in hospital whilst actually giving birth etc

    c) How are births in regards to water births/not having epidural etc? Allowed if a 'normal/low risk' pregnany, or not available over there unless you pay for private (or not even then)?

     

    Sorry for all the questions - I am totally ignorant about giving birth full stop tbh, my total experience would be watching one born every minute on tv here, but we are hoping to start a family soonish after getting to Australia (fingers crossed!) and having read up on this from books and internet sites, am confused/bemused etc :chatterbox:

     

    Thank you if you can help :)

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    Father ARE allowed at births, well i certainly was for our one 3 years ago, and i will be for our one due in a couple of months.

     

    All expenses are covered under medicare if public hospital is used, some GAP payments need to be paid for your regular check ups at the doctors.

     

    Rest is as per UK.

     

    Only our experience, maybe someone else can give some different opinions

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    Guest guest3462

    Hi there, I am 36 weeks pregnant and looking forward to having my little one at Flinders in the next few weeks (days would also be good at this stage lol!!)

    Here are some answers to your questions:

     

    1) Fathers and birthing partners are very welcome during the antenatal, labour and birthing process, whether you are low risk, high risk and even c-section!!!!

     

    2) Most costs are covered by medicare in the public sector. I have had to pay only for my initial GP consultation to confirm the pregnancy ($34) and 2 ultrasound scans. One 6 week dating scan and a 12 week scan at a total cost of $178 but we got about $70 back from medicare. All of my blood work was free. You will have your first booking appointment some time after your 12 week scan at the hospital and from then on all care is free including your antenatal, labour and delivery and any postnatal care you and baby needs.

     

    You can opt for private healthcare if you have the cover, (or money to burn) but there is almost always a gap of about $1000 on top of the cover you receive, so we asked ourselves is it worth it? and the answer was no for us. I have a small family already and do not want to "recouperate" in the Hilton hotel for a week after the birth!!!

     

    3) There are birthing centres which encourage all aspects of natural childbirth if that is what you want. You do have to "qualify" for this by being low risk and you have to make yourself heard early on in your pregnancy that you would like to opt for the birth centre rather than hospital care as places are limited. I am classed as high risk for this pregnancy so I have to go to the labour and delivery suite in hospital, but I still intend to go for a natural and drug free labour as best I can. Believe me though i'm no martyr and if I need medicinal help i'll be taking it!! (i've had 2 pregnancies, 1 epidural and one with nothing and preferred the one with nothing, but it was very quick to be honest!)

     

    My antenatal care has been great, due to being high risk though I haven't seen a midwife only medics and due to that I think i have missed out on vital info such as post natal community care - what happens and if there are any mother and baby groups locally to me (stuff that generally drs have no interest or knowledge of, but your midwife would be telling you about from day one. My next appt is friday and im going to collar one of the midwives in the clinic to get her to fill me in!!! Good job I have a big mouth!

     

    Hope this helps a bit, don't worry, medical care in Australia is world class and try to remember that even though we are a country in the back of beyond we are pretty civilised when it comes to medicine!! LOL!

    Julia x

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    Guest drpom

    As an obstetricain working in a public hospital I agree with all above

    There is very little difference from the UK...reassuringly

    Jeremy@drpom.com.au

    http//www.drpom.com.au

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    Guest Weez

    yep i agree with the above. all my costs were covered by medicare (9 scans in total!!) tho i had to pay a $10 gap fee whenever i went to my GP, i had my bub in a midwife run birthing centre at the local hospital, due to being induced i couldnt have exactly the birth i wanted tho it was close to it, the midwives let me do everything i wanted that was possible, i had my eldest 14 years ago in the uk and i was a awful experience this time around it was fantastic, the care was amazing:D

     

    good luck

    xx

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    Having had babies here and there I'd say that at low risk level there are differences between UK and Australia, but it depends what your priorities are. The culture is different - far more obstetrician led here. But you pays your money and takes your choice! There is potentially more choice here (unless you want your baby at home!) so need to make sure you look for what suits you and your priorities. I'd say in general medical practice here is far more anti-homebirth here than the UK which is a shame because it is a valid choice, just not for everyone. But PLEASE let's not debate that.

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    Guest Adelaide_bound

    Wow!!

     

    Thank you all so so much - what lovely friendly helpful people you are.

     

    Am soooooo glad that the info I read about fathers not being welcome was obviously complete tosh, whilst I don't really want Rob at the business end, it would be nice for someone to hold my hand whilst panting lol (Hark at me, not even in Australia yet, let along trying to get pregnant or pregnant itself, but it is part of the moving plan, so important to us to get all the correct info :) )

     

    It all sounds good, and from the other posts about medical things in general, Australia seems to be winning against the UK on that front (don't worry, I know its not perfect and has an aging population, with less people having private insurance and therefore it is due to get worse in the coming years - eyes wide open here! :biglaugh: )

     

    Thanks again all, very reassuring to know :D

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    Guest Taylors08

    Hi, I had my last baby here at Flinders, we moved over when I was 18 weeks pregnant on a perm visa and the only thing we have had to pay for was the first GP appointment as said above ($34). I had high risk pregnancy as with my other 2 i had preaclampsia and I did again this time. And i was induced. That said I found my care with my midwife absolutely second to none! Loved her! Having had 2 babies in the UK and never had a problem always had lovely midwifes. The midwife here just seemed to go that 1 step further making me feel comfortable. Hubby/partner can stay the night with you in Flinders for $10 a night.

    Hope this helps because i know exactly what you mean about the out of date information, i found that 2 years ago when i was researching it.

    Kelly x

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    Guest nirudaka

    Hi Guys,

     

    I'm new to this but I have few questions hope you don't mind. We are expecting our VISA soon, also my wife is expecting our 3rd on Next November. i have few doubts since we are on 475 visa, and we are not eligible for Medicare,

     

    1. What will be the cost for LSCS in Adelaide?

    2. Will it worth to our baby to born in Aus rather than in Sri Lanka?

    3. What are the Pro's and Con's of giving a birth to a child since we are on 475 visa?

     

    Please can someone help me on this...............

     

    Cheers,

     

    Nirudaka

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    Guest Mrs & Mrs T

    If i was to have another (not that iv decided, as i have 2 already), but i had my last one at home and i would choose to do this again, why is it that home birth is discouraged? Is it still a viable option or would i/you be advised against it?

     

    Thanks Sx

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    If i was to have another (not that iv decided, as i have 2 already), but i had my last one at home and i would choose to do this again, why is it that home birth is discouraged? Is it still a viable option or would i/you be advised against it?

     

    Thanks Sx

     

    I had a homebirth with my first here in the UK (it was bril) and plan to another one, all being well for our second.

     

    I was really discouraged when reading about homebirth in Aus and the obstacles in the way for those wanting one. Not to say people can't have them, just its nowhere near as easy as it is in the UK. Our NHS midwives are covered insurance wise, its all taken care of under the NHS umbrella.

     

    The main problem in Aus seems to be the decision (excuse wording here, its late and I can't recall the exact ins and outs) by the medical powers that be, in the public health service (ie not private) to no longer insure midwives to be covered for homebirthing. So any midwife wishing to assist homebirths has to have their own insurance. Or be self employed or some such and again, have their own insurance. And alas, the cost of this is high and many are not able to or not willing to fork out for it.

     

    Therefore it has made it difficult for homebirthing. To say the least. Midwives have to jump through some major hoops to be able to help women give birth at home.

     

    I did some research about homebirthing in SA and in the end felt I would rather remain in the UK to give birth to our second and ensure I could have access to the full homebirth facilities the NHS provide. I was put off considering moving to Aus before we had another child for no end of reasons, all of them outside of hospital care. Sad but true.

     

    Anyways, some links for you :) I've more if you want them but google can turn up loads for you. Its not all doom and gloom and it can be done. Read the stuff in full as there is some really interesting reading in it all.

     

    http://www.homebirthaustralia.org/

     

    http://www.homebirth.net.au/2010/01/sa-homebirth-report.html

     

    http://www.homebirth.net.au/2011/05/acm-homebirth-position-statement.html

     

    http://www.homebirthsa.org.au/HBN-Midwives.htm

     

    http://www.homebirthaustralia.org/keep-private-midwifery-alive

     

    And a Facebook group for homebirthing - http://www.facebook.com/pages/Save-Home-Birth-in-Australia/102957939870

     

    This is from 2007 and not sure if its all still relavent. Check and see if there is a more up to date one somewhere online. - http://www.health.sa.gov.au/ppg/portals/0/planned_home_birth_policy_SA.pdf

     

    Yeah, its a subject close to my heart.

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    Don't be too put off by the homebirth thing here. I have to say I am now at the "business end" of the Group Practice homebirth scheme through Womens and children's. There is a hospital homebirth scheme for pretty much anywhere you live in Adelaide and having used the NHS Community midwifery model for homebirth in UK and the Group Practice here, actually apart from the dreaded protocol (!) I'd say here rivals there.

     

    In fact, I have had a named midwife all the way through.

     

    All of my appointments have been at home. This was never the case with our UK homebirths. (Had 3).

     

    I don't expect to be told when I am in labour that they can't staff it and that we have to go to hospital at a point it's too late (and if I wanted that first off i'd have chosen it...) - happened twice in UK so we had 2 BBAs

     

    My named midwife is on call for me whether she's on duty or not

     

    They have delivered homebirth kit and medical supplies to our house... including oxygen. In the UK they used to go on and on about the fact they don't carry oxygen. Here it's all waiting, including drugs in my fridge, and whilst I hope not to use these things, the midwives are equipped.

     

    So - whilst the protocol and the politics surrounding homebirth here aren't pretty, if you are considered "by them" to be low risk... actually the care is very very good, the service is accessible and I am very pleased with it. The independent midwife is no longer such an option (tho they have a way that they can practice legally without calling themselves midwives) but from what I hear from friends working independently in the UK... it's all going pretty much the same way worldwide.

     

    I'd not (though did consider) base my decision on moving on whether I was having a baby or not. Although I have to say, birth is one of those areas where if you have a good support network for homebirth etc, and you "know who your people are" coming here and having to make new contacts isn't 100% fun. But on the other hand, it's a quick way to find like minded people.

     

    Stick with me snifter, I'll introduce you to some nice people!!!!

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    Stick with me snifter, I'll introduce you to some nice people!!!!

     

    Thanks Sally, though alas I have been put off already. Just the fact its now made so hard, like they have lost faith with midwives and want every woman to deliver in hospital. Also I would probably not be classed as low risk and may well be refused. A chance I am not willing to take.

     

    Here in the UK I was not classed as low risk by the doctors but my homebirth was never refused. Advised against by the docs and consultant but never refused. My midwife discussed my case with the other two midwives in the team and all 3 were happy to support my choice and for me to deliver at home. I was confident, had a husband who also supported homebirth and it was a wonderful experience. I was appalled at the doctors tactics trying to scare and guilt me into delivering in hospital it only strengthend my resolve to try to deliver at home.

     

    I also had total one on one midwife care and she would come out to the house for appointments and also I'd go in to see her. She also went above and beyond the call of duty as I went into labour proper after her on call shift was over by a few hours. But she said I was one of her ladies and to phone her and she was happy to be the first midwife attending and the on call one could then come out and be the second. Which is what happened. She came out at 8pm having gone off duty at 5pm and stayed till 9am the next morning.

     

    My homebirth experience was great. I can't fault them. I had all the medical stuff dropped off at 36 weeks, never a question that there would not be a midwife to attend (we lived very rural and our team of midwives didn't cover from hospital so it was never an issue they would not be able to send one) and I was so much happier and comfortable being at home.

     

    This time round, although we live in a different area, its still covered by a team of community midwives who do not cover hospitals but who do cover homebirths. My two midwives both really support homebirth. Perhaps I've just been lucky both times. My first, in West Somerset, has a much higher homebirth rate than anywhere else in the UK. In double figures per cent wise compared with as low as 2,3 or 4 per cent elsewhere. As high as 17 or 18 per cent in some years they are recorded as.

     

    I also need an operation after next baby is born. And I am not confident I'd be able to access this easily if we moved to Australia and I give birth there. Its a pre exisiting medical condition and one that I can have operated on on the NHS here without worry.

     

    So yes, lots of reasons for us to have our second here before we make the move. Believe me, we've given it a great deal of thought and neither of us are confident we'd get another homebirth over there or my op, and so won't chance it.

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    All you've said Snifter... very wise. CAn't wait to see you when you get here we are most definitely on the same page. And aint that rare!

     

    I was thinking about this and yes if you're not classed as low risk the only choice is an "independent midwife" but now "birth worker". And something about me feels that's not right and I wish it hadn't been shoved underground. I am very sad about the state of midwifery as I perceive / experience it as a "user" here... like any job I am sure midwives vary and there will be those on PIA who feel similar and those who are happier with the more medical approach, I am sure.

     

    I think to be honest the community midwifery where we came from was very poor in terms of staffing so we had nothing like you are describing, and only through good support were able to feel confident to stay at home when ostensibly abandoned by our carers at the 11th hour... but we were already in a place where we knew we needed a doula who by that time was a very good friend and we were not alone. "Freebirthing" is too common here for my liking and not my style at all... though I won't begrudge others the decision to do it, I'd never choose it.

     

    So Snifter... what's your timetable for "baby" and moving? Do you have one?

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    Sally, I had a miscarriage very recently. I was 10 weeks pregnant and had this one lasted we'd have been having a Christmas baby and then planning to move in Sept/Oct 2012. We now have to start trying again sometime in the not too distant future which will then push the move back. But there, it will take as long as it takes, just hopefully not too long. I'm fit and well, don't seem to have problems getting pregnant, even being older, and so we are just keeping our fingers crossed it will happen for us in the next 6 months or so and this one will stick. We then plan to push for my op as soon as possible after so we can then move at the earliest possible date we can manage. If we don't get pregnant within a certain time we will probably rethink our plans about keeping on trying for another.

     

    Cross those bridges and all that. We are keeping optimistic :)

     

    And yes, very much look forward to meeting you once we are over there. It does seem like we have things in common and its always good in my book :D

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    ((((((snifter)))))) really sorry to hear that. Hope you didn't mind my asking but I hope because you posted that it means I didn't ask out of turn. Will be thinking of you. xxxx

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    Not at all Sally. I'm quite open about it. Of course I am upset and everything else that comes with it, but I can't change it and I'd rather not sweep it under the carpet or be afraid to talk about it from time to time. I don't talk about it in such a way as to be offloading all my feelings about it, I just try to be matter of fact and hopefully people won't feel awkward or unsure what to say. I don't tell everyone I see in my day to day life or anything either, but some people do know. We'd told them I was pregnant, so had to tell them the news when I miscarried. Rather that than the never telling about being pregnant and never telling about the miscarriage. That seems more wrong to me.

     

    I'll stop waffling. I'm good, looking to the future and all that.

     

    :)

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    Can confirm following using their services on Sunday afternoon (!) that the Women's and Childrens Group Practice Homebirth programme is FANTASTIC. :)

     

    :cute:

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