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Schools

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    Hi, researching schools can be very time consuming but it is very important to find the right one. There is an expo on in May at the Adelaide Entertainment Centre which can help you and the website has quite a bit of information. I also have have an online school magazine.

    Strangely primary school in Adelaide goes all the way until year 7, whereas in the other states year 7 is in high schools. This is something that may change in the future. There are a lot of education links between the UK and Australia, in fact the new Director of Education (from May 2011) is coming over from England. Right now Adelaide has an oversupply of teachers, there was information about this in the newspaper yesterday that the SA Government has 50 more teachers than it needs!

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    If anyone is interested in home education (either longer term or for a "season" after you get here) and how that works here then I'd be happy to help with introductions, & social group info, registration info, curriculum info etc.

     

    I'm not the only one home educating on PIA and I am sure we can between us help anyone who's half tempted or more serious! The expo as far as I know contains no "alternative" school options so just putting that out here in case that helps anyone. I for one wish we'd had a longer time acclimatising before we sent DS1 to school (he wasn't 6 yet so officially we didn't have to) and for many reasons that was a bad idea. I know it can work for others - partly depends on your child i'm sure.

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    Guest schooled
    If anyone is interested in home education (either longer term or for a "season" after you get here) and how that works here then I'd be happy to help with introductions, & social group info, registration info, curriculum info etc.

     

    I'm not the only one home educating on PIA and I am sure we can between us help anyone who's half tempted or more serious! The expo as far as I know contains no "alternative" school options so just putting that out here in case that helps anyone. I for one wish we'd had a longer time acclimatising before we sent DS1 to school (he wasn't 6 yet so officially we didn't have to) and for many reasons that was a bad idea. I know it can work for others - partly depends on your child i'm sure.

     

    Hi Sally, you are very ] mistaken, the expo has schools from just about every sector and home education plus a whole lot more! Plus a lot of professionals to help with learning difficulties, reading, tutoring, dance, music, visual arts, etc, etc and lots of resources for parents. Looks like you need to visit it.

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    I'm not sure I warrant red writing! And no I don't need to visit, am really happy with my current resources and info pool. There's nothing on the website referring to home education (and there wasn't in the South Kids issue either) but I'm glad to hear that there's home ed info in the expo, if that's the case.

     

    My post was merely a helpful offer on the subject of schools, sorry to have upset you. Not sure if you've joined PIA just for the "one post" or whether you're here to stay -if you're here to stay and get to know us, I look forward to it. :)

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    I'm not sure I warrant red writing! And no I don't need to visit, am really happy with my current resources and info pool. There's nothing on the website referring to home education (and there wasn't in the South Kids issue either) but I'm glad to hear that there's home ed info in the expo, if that's the case.

     

    My post was merely a helpful offer on the subject of schools, sorry to have upset you. Not sure if you've joined PIA just for the "one post" or whether you're here to stay -if you're here to stay and get to know us, I look forward to it. :)

     

    Hi, didn't mean to offend either, I was looking for the Bold, but red came up. It was to highlight the fact that Home Education will be there, and a lot more - a great day out to find all sorts of things to do with school education (whether that's home schooling/education or not), plus seminars for parents from professionals in education. It's publicised in more than South Kids also Aussie Kids and soon you'll see it just about every mainstream media including tv. I've got a lot of information on education to give free and freely, been in this sector for many years and work with many like minded innovative people.:) Always happy to help!

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    I'm not sure I warrant red writing!

     

    :biglaugh::biglaugh::biglaugh:

     

    What's wrong with red writing......I often used to get red writing at school - usually with a few "X's next to them

     

    I had a look at the website too and couldn't see anything about home schooling either but I guess doesn't mean it's not there. In this day people have a lot of options in relation to schooling their children and personally I think that is a good thing.

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    Strangely primary school in Adelaide goes all the way until year 7, whereas in the other states year 7 is in high schools. This is something that may change in the future.

     

    I really hope it doesn't! I think it's one of the best things about the education system here and gives kids a lot longer to be just kids before the pressures of high school. Certainly is a contributing factor to a happy childhood in my opinion!

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    I really hope it doesn't! I think it's one of the best things about the education system here and gives kids a lot longer to be just kids before the pressures of high school. Certainly is a contributing factor to a happy childhood in my opinion!

     

    I'm interested in your opinion. Especially as this is the only state that does this. I've heard students say they don't like it because they don't think they should be in primary at that age and a friend who just returned to the UK (didn't like it here at all - both mum and daughter very unhappy) said other parents she networked with didn't like it either. I know it's on the cards to change.

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    I'm interested in your opinion. Especially as this is the only state that does this. I've heard students say they don't like it because they don't think they should be in primary at that age and a friend who just returned to the UK (didn't like it here at all - both mum and daughter very unhappy) said other parents she networked with didn't like it either. I know it's on the cards to change.

     

    Do you think the change is because of the new NC? Can I ask if you are a teacher?

     

     

    Cooler

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    Well one of the things that struck us when we first came out here was how confident and articulate teenagers are here in Adelaide, compared to those both in the UK and elsewhere in Australia, and I think the school system here can take a lot of credit for that. Year 7 here for kids is a great year - allows them to really enjoy their last year of primary school (I feel high schools are much more pressured) with some extra responsibilities, lots of extra curricular activities - I think it's great and has long-reachng advantages. Certainly worked for my two anyway.

     

    OK Adelaide may be a little bit old fashioned, but to be honest, as someone who grew up in the UK in the 70s and had a very happy childhood, I feel that Adelaide has been able to offer just the same to my kids. Yes, perhaps it's out of date in comparison to many other places, but as a parent considering my childrens' welfare and happiness, "old-fashioned" is a positive for me, not a negative!

     

    Long may it continue! Other states in Australia are no shining example to hold up, so if it's not broke, don't fix it!

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    Interstate too they have a different entry system, with kids starting at the beginning of the year if they are going to turn five before the cut off date. Back when we used to only have three terms in the year the grade 7s were younger, like the grade 6s now as they could just do 1 term in rec and then go up. I think this is where the move the grade 7s up to high school has come from. Some teachers feel they need the bigger environment. A lot of English privates used to only start their senior schools at 13, with the prep schools keeping them til then. People used to have probs when they moved to QLD as school didn't start until 6 and their littlies would find themselves back in kindy. It doesn't really matter which environment your grade 7 is in, as a good teacher should be able to stimulate and excite their brains into retaining a little worldly knowledge and experience. Year 7 in primary though is an excellent year for lengthy discussions and debates as this is the age at which kids really begin to look outside of themselves and their families. This time is lost if crammed with the need for science labs and a more jam packed curriculum.

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    I think that whether primary school finishes at year 7 or at year 6, the final year would be treated much the same - they would still have the activities, graduation etc but then I think it comes down to the individual child.

     

    My kids were both more than ready to take on high school, one for academic reasons and the other because he and his mates were just too 'big' lol. I don't think one year will make them grow up any faster and I don't think that keeping them in primary school necessarily keeps them younger. Certainly watching many of the Year 8s at high school that isn't the case! ( That said there are also some young ladies who look and act like Year 11 when they enter high school!)

     

    I personally love our system pretty much the way it is and it scares me a little to learn our new Director of Education is from the UK. I guess at the end of the day, the kids are in part products of their environment so whether they stay kids or become young adults will, in part be down to a whole heap of influences not just what year they finish primary school.

     

    All just my opinion though :)

    LC

    PS. Every time I see your name Diane, I smile. If it weren't for you, we might never have discovered The Chocolate Bean and Jumpforit.com! Thank you :)

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    I personally love our system pretty much the way it is and it scares me a little to learn our new Director of Education is from the UK.

     

    Hear hear!!

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    Guest Viksta

    Hi all

    you all seem to know alot about the school system over there, so wondering if i can pick your brains!?!

    I'm hoping to come out as a pre-primary/early childhood teacher but cant find anywere on any website what this age range actually is? I currently teacher foundation stage in England (age 4 & 5) but is is right that children don't start school until they are six? Is this a Reception yr or is this straight into yr 1? Do you have a reception yr or is it part of nursery/kindy?

    Also i have a little boy whose birthday is jan, he will be starting nursery here in Sept then reception in Sept 2012 (if we are still here) can you advise on where he would be going if for example we arrived about this time next year?

    Any advise would be warmly recieved!

    Thanks Vikki!

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    A teacher here who has an Early Childhood degree can teach 0-8 ear olds as this is what the course covers. This means childcare, kindy and junior primary levels Rec, yr 1, 2 and 3. In SA most children start soon after they are 5, but legally they don't have to start school until 6th birthday. Children start their first year at school in Rec, then progress to yr 1 etc, even if they start at 6. They have to spen a minimum of three terms in REC. If your son turns 4 in January 2012 then he would do 2012 at kindy here. he would then go into rec in Jan of 2013 when he is 5.

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    Guest Viksta
    A teacher here who has an Early Childhood degree can teach 0-8 ear olds as this is what the course covers. This means childcare, kindy and junior primary levels Rec, yr 1, 2 and 3. In SA most children start soon after they are 5, but legally they don't have to start school until 6th birthday. Children start their first year at school in Rec, then progress to yr 1 etc, even if they start at 6. They have to spen a minimum of three terms in REC. If your son turns 4 in January 2012 then he would do 2012 at kindy here. he would then go into rec in Jan of 2013 when he is 5.

     

     

    Thank you so much for that, that has helped a great deal! I spent hrs last night looking for something, but was probably looking in all the wrong places! Good to know Charlie could start school the year he is 5!

    Thanks again for your help!

    Vikki:)

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    Hear hear!!

     

    Don't worry about the new Director from the UK, we need new leadership, new blood in SA. DECS needs it badly. I have worked with people in the dept and they are in a mess, no leadership and frustrated. There are many very unhappy teachers in Australia (new survey information released this week). They want to leave the profession and start a fresh career. They are not unhappy teaching, or with the children, or with the parents, but they are with the various depts of education and the huge demands they face that are unnecessary and stifling teaching. That's why the education depts want to pay off ($50,000) per head to teachers that are burnt out, tired and had enough for an early retirement sweetener. Just think of what that $50,000 per head could do for the government schools. Sure the BER helped many schools, but there's a whole lot more that money could do which can help students.

    There are many outstanding teachers in both countries in the government sectors, but one wonders how come the private sector is growing so rapidly in Australia - we have over 31% of schools that are non-government now and growing. Whereas in the UK it's something like 2.5%! Most people want the best for their children and they see that there are many affordable non-government schools in Australia (albeit many heavily religious based which doesn't suit all families). There is a lot to consider, but there's plenty of information to help make those decisions, including school education magazines online and expos. As a matter of interest, education links between the two countries have strong ties. The new super schools being built in Adelaide have taken the best of the UK systems.

    Just remember, this is not paradise - the grass is always greener, what is important is making the most of where you choose to live. Personally, I love both countries they both have so much to offer. A good life is not just about sunshine and beaches. The sun doesn't shine here all the time and it does get unbearably hot. Our (adult) daughters chose not to live in Australia they prefer England and Australia for the occasional holiday so we spend time in both countries. :)

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    Not everyone wants their kid in a super school. At the moment they are not full but think of a school which can take three times the amount. Sure they will have great facilities etc, but will they provide a community where no child is just another face. This is already hard enough in a normal large school. These super schools are also in areas where the students may be of great need in engagement and a sense of belonging.

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    I'd heard house prices in places like Walkerville are already suffering as people who can't get their kids into the very popular Adelaide High School are loathe to send their kids to the Super School being built at Gepps Cross. I think - certainly here in Adelaide - the propensity for private schools is helped by the fact that fees are relatively low compared to elsewhere in Australlia (and in the UK).

     

    By the way, for anyone coming over, or at the stage of considering private schools, I'd like to add that my children are non-religious in a religion-based school. Doesn't seem to do them any harm and I hope I have brought them up to make their own choices and judgements. I don't 100% agree with them having to study religion up to Year 12, but they do learn about all religions not just the "main" one at the school, and I don't think the ethos of "doing unto others" etc, is such a bad thing to live by.;)

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    Yep same. My son went to an Anglican school and my daughters attended and attend a uniting church girls school. None of them had to study religion in year 12. The concepts which have been taught through general ethics an religious education about once or twice a week in the first few years of high school are pretty much the same as non religious folks generally live their lives with anyway.

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    Guest Billious
    .

    There are many outstanding teachers in both countries in the government sectors, but one wonders how come the private sector is growing so rapidly in Australia - we have over 31% of schools that are non-government now and growing. Whereas in the UK it's something like 2.5%! Most people want the best for their children and they see that there are many affordable non-government schools in Australia (albeit many heavily religious based which doesn't suit all families). .

     

    I'm not sure to what level non-government schools are funded at in the UK. Federal funding and small amounts of State funding may be the reason non-government schools are growing here in SA.

     

    I'd also suggest that there are outstanding teachers in the government AND the non-government sector. (Having taught in both)

     

    Independant schools will continue to grow as long as people see the need for them.

     

    And breifly on the primary/high school debate: there has been a trend for non-government r-12 schools to develop a 'middle school'. This is essential creating a 3rd sub school and runs from year 6 or 7 up to year 9 or 10. DECS is a long way from being able to move to that model, given the massive infrastructure it would require.

    Primary schools (r-7) pride themselves on being able to prepare students for high school, and I believe they will always have their place.

     

    cheers

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