Tarek

Racism?!

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    Hello there, it's my first post although I have been following up the forums for a long time.

     

    OK, we are moving to Adelaide, and I have some concerns and I was just wondering if Muslims are tolerated there or not.

     

    Unfortunately, some Muslim fanatics give very bad example about the rest of Muslims and in fact, they are not tolerated at all by moderate Muslims giving everyone around the idea that Muslims are terrorists by nature and wearing a TNT belt around their waists, they are closed on themselves, have no appreciation for others and the negative list can go as long as there is a writing space :(

     

    My wife wears a head scarf, and this is the only thing that can tell whether we are Muslims or not, other than this, our lifestyle is the same and anyone else.

     

    We lived in Frankfurt, Germany for some time and to be honest it wasn't a pleasurable experience.

     

    I hope that my family new life in Adelaide will be different, so I'd really appreciate any comments/thoughts about this.

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    Guest Guest5035

    you'll be right here, as you said its the ones that demand this/that etc etc that get the abuse.

     

    stevo

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    Guest Guest5035
    I wouldn't treat you any different if you were my neighbour!!!

     

    even if they supported everton..

     

    stevo

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    There are racists everywhere you go and I think Muslims have gotten a bad rap as you said. My parents came from another country, although I was born here and they were treated differently as if they were the poor relation to Australian people. From my perspective I've seen that change a lot. We've lived in our neighbourhood a long time and we don't think of ourselves any different to our neighbours. In fact we have a few people of different backgrounds in our area. I think Sydney had a a problem in the news a few years ago in Cronulla riots - targetted at people of middle eastern backgrounds. It is there and some areas are problematic but generally people mind their own business and get on with their day to day lives. One of my friends who is from a Chinese background lived in an area in Adelaide where there were particular racist groups and he stuck it out for many years but eventually moved into another neighbourhood which was fine.

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    These are very encouraging replies indeed, when we were making our decision on which state to settle in, we immediately fell in love with Adelaide, I don't know why, but we really made extensive researches on the internet, we viewed houses, parks, schools, everything and we just loved Adelaide.

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    I work in HR/recruitment and I would say from what I have witnessed racism in employment is alive and well!!! I am not sure what sector you will be seeking employment in, but some nationalities do struggle to gain employment, although often this is due to a combination of factors but race does come into it, in my experience.

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    Guest Guest5035
    T I think Sydney had a a problem in the news a few years ago in Cronulla riots - targetted at people of middle eastern backgrounds..

     

    twas the other way round actually.

     

    stevo

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    I've experienced racism on several occasions and i've only been here 3 months...yep been called a pommie bast7rd quite a few times:sad: Once I said...I'm from Wales, does that help? It did'nt...was called a sheepshagger as well:shocked: Now that bit really hurt...but i'm getting over it.

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    twas the other way round actually.

     

    stevo

     

    Yeah, you're right it was the other way around....I just remember it was an awful thing to see. It was the first time I had ever heard of anything so bad in Australia.

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    I work in HR/recruitment and I would say from what I have witnessed racism in employment is alive and well!!! I am not sure what sector you will be seeking employment in, but some nationalities do struggle to gain employment, although often this is due to a combination of factors but race does come into it, in my experience.

     

    That shouldn't be a problem, I'm planning to open my own business and I will not hire based on race preference. We really want to start a new life and we hope that we start it right.

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    I think what helps here in Adelaide is that there are no particular areas that particular races gravitate towards, so you don't get the "mini-ghetto" thing going on that perhaps you might get in other cities: most suburbs seem to be pretty racially mixed, so everyone is used to being very much a part of a multi-racial society. There are a few places where there is a slightly higher level of a particular race or nationality: Athelstone (near us) and some of the eastern suburbs for instance seem to have a slightly higher than normal percentage of Italians, some of the southern suburbs may now have a higher proportion of new Brits, and places like Elizabeth in the north have a higher proportion of "old" Brits (lots of the original "Ten Pound Poms"), a couple of the north western suburbs have highish numbers of Vietnamese and Polish settlers, and there are a few areas that have groups of settlers from Sudan. Not sure about religions, but if your wife wears a head scarf, she definitely won't be alone, as I've seen lots of women in all different suburbs wearing them (probably a very wise thing to do anyway, for sun protection as well as religious reasons, here). You may have to get used to the aussie "bluntness" - for instance, I was quite shocked when I first heard someone of Italian-descent here referred to as a "wog" but I've since learnt that this isn't (usually) meant in a derogatory way, same as the term "pommy bastard" which is often used as a kind of test - if you take offence, you may just have failed the test, whereas if you laugh it off and come back with a laugh and a joke, you pass and will be "one of the gang" from there on in!

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    There's a lovely new mosque just been built down on Marion Road at Ascot Park. Plenty of Muslims around that area, I see women with headscarves in that area most days when I drive to and from work ..... but you see people of all ethnicities everywhere now, and we just all get along with each other. I wouldn't worry to be honest.

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    Guest Squareman

    Best of luck Tarek. I dont think your experiences will surpass the german ones. Im sure you'll be fine

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    Guest Guest5035
    but if your wife wears a head scarf, she definitely won't be alone, as I've seen lots of women in all different suburbs wearing them (probably a very wise thing to do anyway, for sun protection as well as religious reasons, here). !

     

    not only for sun protection and religous reasons, but to hide a bad hair day aswell

     

    stevo

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    Guest Jo&Phil

    While a great many Australians originally come from somewhere else, or Mum/Dad/Grandma did, there can be elements who don't easily accept people who look different to themselves. Certainly the current political/media noise about Islam can exacerbate this. In the main I don't think it is worse than anywhere else and, once Australians get to know you, they are (generally) a very accepting lot. Some people seem to demonstrate a low level inbuilt racism to people of a different colour but this tends to be unstated ... which probably makes it harder to deal with. We have several Muslim colleagues at work (some who cover their hair) and they're all accepted as part of the team. This is in higher education where international students are also commonplace so it may depend on the work sector you are in, where you live, etc

     

    Having said all of that, the absolute majority of people I know are welcoming, normal people who are smart enough to cut through the 'Today Tonight' (dire TV magazine type show) chatter and take people for who they are.

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    I think people have no problem with headscarves as you can still see the face - however there has been some problems ID'ing someone where their face was covered and some people have been pushing for a ban. This has brought into focus the whole ethnicity debate and there seems some lack of integration. Personally, If I cannot see your face then I cannot hear you as I have poor hearing and rely on facial cues. Consequently I avoid eye contact to avoid embarrasment but may be judged to be unwelcoming which I am certainly not!

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    Hi Tarek,

     

    Really I don't feel that racism is an issue here. We have been here for 18 months and I worried about the very same things.

    OH is Turkish Cypriot and I am Mauritian (both of us born in the UK), of course the kids are mixed race. I was scared that the kids would have problems at school, but nothing of the sort. Everyone seems more interested in my English accent, and they love to hear me talk. I went to the Christmas pageant in the city (big thing here) and there was a group of us from school, they were handing out sweets, and I said quiet loudly oh I'd love a sweetie please, everyone turned around and said I was a true pommy though and though, as they call sweets lollies here, I laughed and said it's in me blood nothing that I can do about it. Just go with the flow and you'll be fine. I feel so at ease here that I kinda forget about the colour of my skin. It's very mixed here, lots of Italians, asians, indian's, aussies etc etc...

     

    Wish you all the best if you need any help, just ask away

    Prema x

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    I think people have no problem with headscarves as you can still see the face - however there has been some problems ID'ing someone where their face was covered and some people have been pushing for a ban. This has brought into focus the whole ethnicity debate and there seems some lack of integration. Personally, If I cannot see your face then I cannot hear you as I have poor hearing and rely on facial cues. Consequently I avoid eye contact to avoid embarrasment but may be judged to be unwelcoming which I am certainly not!

     

    I totally agree, while I do respect everyone's freedom in choosing what he or she wears, but covering face means hiding ID, and if someone is hiding his ID then I would feel uneasy.

     

    Actually I worked for sometime in Saudi Arabia where most of Saudi ladies are covered from head to toe (which is more of a habit and does not relate to Islam), but they are the exception. In Egypt where I came from, we don't have such mentality (we only have revolutions :)

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    Hi Tarek,

     

    Really I don't feel that racism is an issue here. We have been here for 18 months and I worried about the very same things.

    OH is Turkish Cypriot and I am Mauritian (both of us born in the UK), of course the kids are mixed race. I was scared that the kids would have problems at school, but nothing of the sort. Everyone seems more interested in my English accent, and they love to hear me talk. I went to the Christmas pageant in the city (big thing here) and there was a group of us from school, they were handing out sweets, and I said quiet loudly oh I'd love a sweetie please, everyone turned around and said I was a true pommy though and though, as they call sweets lollies here, I laughed and said it's in me blood nothing that I can do about it. Just go with the flow and you'll be fine. I feel so at ease here that I kinda forget about the colour of my skin. It's very mixed here, lots of Italians, asians, indian's, aussies etc etc...

     

    Wish you all the best if you need any help, just ask away

    Prema x

     

    You seem to be a very cheerful person :)

     

    Well, racism based on skin color is the worst, because you are being blamed for something that you can do nothing about, and I'm very happy to hear that the community in Adelaide does not have such discrimination.

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    Guest zamunda

    Posted this in another similar thread........

     

    Where ever you go in the world there will be the minority that's prejudicial. Just a minority though!

     

    Don't let it get to you.

     

    Nothing compares to what the old South Africa was like. We never lived there, but (living in a neighbouring country) travelled often to South Africa in the "old days". Prejudice was every where. A system in place. During one visit I was with my cousin (asian) and his British wife. At the border we were told that my cousin's wife could not ride in the same car as us because we were of a different colour. We decided to turn back. Today we still talk about it and have a good laugh
    :)

     

    The important thing is to make sure that you mix with everyone. What many immigrants tend to do is stick to their own kind only. I don't believe in this.

     

    I grew up in a Buddhist family. To this date I am a Buddhist. But when I was a child my parents used to send me to Christian Church and on a few occasions went to Mosque with my muslim friends. My parents always said to us..."we are all humans. making us different was god's way of making us ( as individuals )that much more interesting. Getting along with all these different people is to stand the true test".

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    Tarek, You will be very happy here I'm sure.

     

    There are plenty of ethic places to eat and buy food, especially of you want halal.

    I don't eat beef or pork for religious reasons and it is what it is. Everyone accepts that.

     

    My place of work is so mixed there are Brazilians, Italians, Vietnamese, me of course and my good Egyptian friend.

    He does not drink alcohol, and we have no issues, to be fair, people are mostly interested in the difference and what they can learn. Different foods... etc

     

    I see plenty of ladies with head scarves, Aussies tend to have issues with the whole burka thing and when you see people preaching that their religion is better then all others. Be respectful to everyones believes and you will be fine.

     

    It was divarli for me a few weeks back and I made Indian sweets and took them into work. Everyone came over to ask about the story behind the celebration and tucked into my cakes with coffee.

     

    Seriously you will be fine, you may come across someone who doesn't feel the same, but it is what it is, you move on, no different from the UK.

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