Tamara (Homes Down Under)

Todays News: Migrants need deodorant!

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    [h=1]Can you believe this?

     

     

     

    Teach migrants about deodorant, queues: MP[/h] AAP Updated January 10, 2012, 6:22 am

     

     

     

     

    Migrants should be taught about the importance of wearing deodorant and waiting in queues without pushing in, the federal opposition says.

    Cultural awareness training should also be given by employers bringing skilled migrants into Australia under the 457 visa program, the coalition's citizenship spokeswoman Teresa Gambaro told The Australian.

    In an interview with the newspaper, Ms Gambaro said she was concerned about new migrants on work visas not integrating into the community because Australia had failed to teach them about cultural issues related to health, hygiene and lifestyle.

    "Without trying to be offensive, we are talking about hygiene and what is an acceptable norm in this country when you are working closely with other co-workers," she said.

    Wearing deodorant and waiting in line politely were about "teaching what are norms in Australia".

    Ms Gambaro admitted her comments may be viewed as controversial.

    She added that Australians were sometimes guilty of not wearing deodorant on public transport.

    "We all need to be mindful of our fellow traveller," Ms Gambaro said.

    The MP for Brisbane said while her comments may upset people, migrants also needed to be educated about their rights and how to improve their chances of getting work.

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    Guest cazzie

    I agree too. Everyone - regardless of nationality, should smell clean - there is no excuse for BO these days and passing people in the supermarket who clearly don't know what deodorants are for, is really horrible and it happens quite often.

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    Thats what taxes are for though, politicians are paid to speak up for the silent masses, its all to do with political correctness. If you have person in a que in front of you and they stink and happen to be foreign, you say something, you'll get arrested for racism or somthing, so good on her lol:notworthy:

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    Wow... two thoughts - there are no Australians guilty of this?

    Mainly though - my taxes help fund this woman's job?!

     

    Agree with you Soo.

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    Yep - just find it interesting that there's an assumption that 'foreigners stink' (god I hate the term foreigners) and every single person who is a Native of Australia (an interesting term in itself for a country so recently populated by migrants from Europe) smells of roses?!

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    Guest Roo1

    ..........and what about our dear elderly people? I'm forever being queue jumped by them (but its OK as mostly they smell fine) :wink::biglaugh:

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    Guest ladyarkles

    As someone who spent a lot of time in Singapore and Taiwan, I always found it interesting that Westerners were considered to smell bad.

    Apparently, as we have a diet high in dairy products, we smell of sour milk to people who don't eat the same things as us.

     

    I guess it is all relative.

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    [quote name=Tamara (Homes Down Under)Ms Gambaro said she was concerned about new migrants on work visas not integrating into the community because Australia had failed to teach them about cultural issues related to health, hygiene and lifestyle.

     

    She added that Australians were sometimes guilty of not wearing deodorant on public transport.[/quote]

    I think this is a classic example of the media focussing on the seemingly silly BO issue and playing down the rest of it.

     

    That said, everyone knows how body odour can affect the way people are perceived. People who are not fresh-smelling (lol) are surely less likely to be employed, make friends etc which will make integration harder and perhaps lead to feelings of isolation. I wouldn't dog a friend just because they had body odour but the fact is, I would be less likely to get as far as friendship as I wouldn't want to be too near them for too long - not condusive to making friends.

     

    I actually think it is ridiculous that this hasn't been addressed before. One of our mates takes new arrivals through basic training certificates and has shared some alarming tales which highlight a very real need for migrants to have laws and cultural norms explained when they first arrive. That really is just common sense because not all countries have the same laws or consider the same things acceptable/unacceptable.

     

    As for all Australians having perfect hygiene etc, Ms Gambaro does actually mention that isn't the case in the quoted article.

     

    It seems to me that some people are being a bit too critical and PC. I see this as an attempt to ease new arrivals seamlessly into their new lives. Where they can assimilate and not be singled out for not knowing what is socially, culturally or legally accepted in their new home. Because we all know that if someone with a dinky-di accent smells or does something unacceptable to the rest of society, they will be criticised as a person but if a migrant does the same thing, they are more likely to be criticised as an example of their country of origin.

     

    IMHO, of course, lol!

    LC

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