Guest Squareman

Culture

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    Guest Squareman

    I have seen a number of posts recently from people who claim to long for more 'culture' in their lives and how they miss trudging around medeival villages (in the pouring rain) in Blighty.

     

    Now, Aussie is a new, diverse country as we all know. So, I was wondering what kind of cultural experiences you may have enjoyed here, and what you do to get your cultural 'fix'. I haven't really looked at the whole Aboriginal genre as yet, but its something I wouldnt mind doing, for instance.....

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    To get my cultural fix? Go on the Internet!! Lol

     

    Seriously, you can get it by visiting towns out of the city, but it's quite hard seeing as Australia was only discovered a few years ago.

     

    The issue is, every suburb and town are exactly the same. So it's pretty tough.

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    Guest James

    It really is not possible to find much like that and you cannot realise that until you are here. Of course Sydney and Melbourne have more older stuff, some really beautiful and when you go around North Adealide and the Botanics area there are some fabulous buildings, hate to say it though but planning wise it was all down hill after the Australians became independent. Central Adealide has been ruined by speculation and skyscrapers. They just do not seem to care about proportion and architecture or building for the next generation like in Europe. As for the suburbs with overhead electricity and the chepa buildings with tin roofs!

     

    Arts culture and theatre are here however. So depends what you wish

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    I haven't really looked at the whole Aboriginal genre as yet, but its something I wouldnt mind doing, for instance.....

     

    I remember seeing a big display of Aboriginal art one time when we were over for a visit. I spent ages soaking up the intricate artwork and was in awe at the detail and the time that must have gone in to it all. Not just small pieces either, but covering entire walls. I remember doing some reading on the history of the Aboriginal people after the colonisation. Didn't make for easy reading often but it was well worth it to gather some insight into what has gone on.

     

    And funny, but the whole culture thing, we are still in the UK and have lived in some stunning rural places or near places of great interest to people and tbh you don't go out into it on a daily basis as a rule anyways. Its just there, you might make a day trip of it or a holiday down to Cornwall or go see a castle, but for us, 95% of the year its normal day to day living.

     

    Of course, in Aus we hope to explore some more there, hubby wants to go into the Flinders again, do some cycling and other things. So it'll be different scenery out there to what we are used to here. I've found it beautiful in the past, even if bleak or unrelenting, it has a beauty of its own. But then I am the person who would rather hike over Dartmoor in the wind and rain than go see it on a sunny day where you can see for miles. Hubby is looking forward to rediscovering things over again also :)

     

    Yes the cities tend to blend in to each other. Its so different to what we are used to in the UK, I can imagine its a real shock to some when they arrive. Its one of the reasons we hope to be in an older suburb nearer the centre if we can manage it. I am living in suburbia here and tbh, the view out of every window is the same, next doors house, the street or back garden and other houses. You get that anywhere you live in a town or city, its the norm for most people. The only times we've not had that is when we've been living rural and our view has been fields, hills and no near neighbours. As lovely as it is, that isn't for everyone and many don't cope with being stuck out in the sticks and would rather be in towns or cities. Perhaps having spent time in the US also, where row upon row of new built suburbia sprawls on for miles has helped me adjust to what I'll see in Adelaide.

     

    I found some lovely parts of the city and don't mind the old with the new. I only have to look at Bristol city centre with its hideous concrete block stores built after the war to know we didn't get it right all the time when building or rebuilding. But go round a corner and an old gem is still standing. I don't know, I think the older buildings in Adelaide, be they business or homes can be lovely, at least to look at. Like any old place can be though, cold and nippy in the winter probably (says she who lived in a house here in the UK with records dating back to 1606 or so that was cold as in winter).

     

    Ramble ended :P

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    There are some great little gems here in Adelaide and the towns in SA, it's bursting full of social history. Some are off the main streets, for example the old stock exchange. I have spent many a road trip following the old railway lines through country SA and you really get to see the place through different eyes. You can just stop and admire the colours of the land which are warm and rich and the backdrop of the Flinders or other ranges in the distance. It may seem harsh at first but there is so much in the landscape, which you slowly appreciate. The cliffs along the Murray are beautiful in their stillness. There are old silver mines you can explore in the hills face not far from the start of the freeway. I think you have to get out and about, there used to be a great series of books which were about each suburb and what to look for when you went for walks through, giving the history. For example Nailsworth, a small suburb , many of the houses were built in the 20s by returned soldiers who were craftsmen. Prospect has no pubs because it was founded by Methodists. The women from Hahndorf used to walk overnight bringing their produce to Adelaide to sell in the morning markets and then walk all the way back. There is tons of history here, you just have to research and you will find. Of course there are no castles...... but really seen one castle you've seen them all...... plus there are some really nice churches. St Peter's Cathedral for example is Anglican, but all the other faiths lutheran, catholic, methodists donated money for it to be built.

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    I remember going to York Peninsula and there being an old school house there when I was kid - my mind just went into their world and Mum (god bless her) had to drag me out as I was just thinking of how school life would have been.

     

    Australia has the oldest race on Earth it's just a shame that the POM invasion decimated a lot of it!!.....................Controversial hey

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    Guest Guest75

    Meeting Aussies from the country will give you a different perspective and a bit of local culture.It's all recent history I know but the tales the country folk tell!!

    Going for a drive next week in a piece of history.......... a 1929 Chevvy!!

    As said,get out into the country towns - we do.

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    Guest James

    Agreed there are historic bits of architecture but in terms of architecture it cannot compare to Europe, the frightening things is the way what is good is destroyed ie proposals for Adelaide Oval massive development next to the beautifuil Cathedral setting . Moving the hospital next to the gardens where patients can go to a contaminated railway site. Too much here is driven by cash considerations not enough thought to pride in the place and leaving a legacy. Adelaide does have some gems but it is/has been ruined by spec buildings It could be a great city with its parks but there is no drive to do that politically, sad and wasted possibility. Note how Melbourne kept its trams while Adelaide ripped up most. It is dominated a car mind set too which is crazy because it is so flat it could be great for alternative trasnport but no one will invest in that.

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    When we need a bit of culture we watch The Castle. ;)

     

    Nah, seriously, I like Rachiegarlo's post, there's a lot to see, a lot to do, it's just not as "old". I like hanging around places like Hahndorf every once in a while, and also my parents loved Yorke P. when they were visiting my inlaws before we moved here. They still talk about it, and how much it reminded them of Cornwall.

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    UK now thats a country driven by cash, you cant leave the house without spending money in my opinion. Its £9 each to look round York minster then you can have a glass of wine in one of the oldest churches in York they turned into a wine bar after you've paid £15 to park.

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    Guest James

    Of course the other thing to think about is how much the old stiff matters to you, I think the poms who talk about it and I am one are very interested in history and architecture, lots of people are not and then it is not an issue to you, so know what you are like and if it will bother you. I did not think about it before I came A friend of mine who has just come back from Italy who has lived here 40 years found it really hard to settle back as he said he just loved all the history in Italy for instance. Other people are more sports orientated and then it does not bother you.

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    Guest James

    Should have said historically probably North Adealide, North Terrace and Botanics and Eastern Parklands for architecture are best, otherwise Port Elliot has some older buidings, Norwood and enviro is one of the better preserved suburbs, other suburbs to teh West are much more speculative, with less green space and old cottages

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    Guest Ric & Paula

    We observed the local tradition of thong throwing on semaphore foreshore last year...Dad in Law was most excited till he realised they were flip-flops:biglaugh:

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    Guest James

    it does have plenty of history but not of a Western civilzation type, how can it, which is why you need to know what matters in your own head. If historic buildings are your thing Adelaide is not best spot on Earth for you, if it is indigenous you like you will be fine, though I do not find that is celebrated much, but then if we think about that too much we get to the thorny issue of should us Europeans be here? Have we a right to the land? Anyway like i say many people are not that bothered by their own cultural history ie Roman Empire and Church for Europe in which case you will not be bothered if you are here, for me walking in a village where you know teh buildings are 500 years old and the Church older is something precious, others could not be bothered by that. We are all individual

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