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Guest teamV

Torrens Title

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    Guest teamV

    What doe's this mean on a house for sale advert,

     

    It is a Torrens Title - that's a normal house title, so you can have a cat or a dog and there are no meetings, levies or approvals to worry about.

     

    What would you do if the house hadn't got a Torrens Title,

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Kev

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    Guest teamV

    Thanks Stevo,it looks fairly complicated I've just seen it on a few houses for sale so thought I'd ask,

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Kev.

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    What doe's this mean on a house for sale advert,

    Nothing much most if not all properties have now been changed over from a Crown Title to a Torrens Title. All homes over 100 years old should be on Torrens Title Deeds. The only other old title is a Moyse Title but I believe there are not many of those left now.

     

    It is a Torrens Title - that's a normal house title, so you can have a cat or a dog and there are no meetings, levies or approvals to worry about.

    Yes it is a normal house title/deed. The title has nothing to do with usage permissions.

    What would you do if the house hadn't got a Torrens Title,

    I would not buy it and a real estate agent would not sell it as all property must have a title deed. Your conveyancer will check these details on the purchase of the property for your security.

     

    The Torrens Title was developed in South Australia way back when to give more security over land ownership and has since been introduced into the US and UK.

     

    Torrens Title System The system employed in all Australian jurisdictions under which title to land is conferred by the official registration of a dealing in that land. The fundamental principles of the system are:

    that it is the act of the Registrar-General in registering a dealing which passes the legal title to land or creates legal interests therein;

    that registration confers indefeasibility of title;

    that it is not necessary for a person intending to deal with the land to investigate the history of a registered proprietor's title; and that the title is guaranteed by the government, such that should a person be deprived of an interest in land, he or she will be paid monetary compensation.

    The system is named after its creator, Robert Torrens, who introduced it in South Australia in 1858.

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