kizzy

last remaining relative visa - advice please

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    My 23 year old son is just coming to the end of his first year's working holiday visa and about to apply for this second year. I've just spoken to the migration agent about how he could stay in Australia permanently thinking we could apply for the last remaining relative visa as he has no siblings or parents in the UK & have been informed that he wont be able to stay. The last remaining relative visa takes >10 years & they no longer do a bridging visa so he would have to go back to the UK & wait for his visa or apply for a skilled visa himself & although he did his apprenticeship in bricklaying he has only ever worked as a labourer. The only option he has is to do a degree which is not going to happen as he is not in the least bit interested in studying. He only has his friends in the UK as he's not close to any other relatives so not sure where he's going to have to go back to.

    :arghh:

     

    If anyone knows of any other options please advise.

     

    Thank you

     

    Tracey

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    Although he is not interested in doing a degree it is a way of him staying so could be kept open as an option. I feel for people in your situation as we want to do the best for our children no matter there age. I hope you find a way around it.

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    Hi

     

    He's never been an academic person & didn't enjoy school, he's more of a hands on person so don't think he'd be able to do a degree.

     

    Think I need to start advertising for a wife for him - maybe PIA should set up its own dating agency lol.

     

    Tracey

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    Now that's another option but not necessarily the best one.

     

    What about the Aussie army/air force/ navy ect. Im sure there will be options open to stay if he was willing to join up for a few years and would leave with citizenship.

     

    I know when I was in the British Army we had many of Aussies doing it the other way around.

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    Now that's another option but not necessarily the best one.

     

    What about the Aussie army/air force/ navy ect. Im sure there will be options open to stay if he was willing to join up for a few years and would leave with citizenship.

     

    I know when I was in the British Army we had many of Aussies doing it the other way around.

     

    To join the ADF you must:

    • be an Australian citizen or a permanent resident eligible for Australian citizenship;
    • be aged from 17 - 55 years (specific age requirements are available on each job information page);
    • Pass specific medical and physical standards; and
    • Meet the minimum educational standards for your chosen job.

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    I would go and ask though. It says the same for the British forces but if you are part of the commonwealth they make exceptions and you leave with citizenship. Im not saying im right n=but it might be an option worth looking into.

     

    Also on the degree side there are some less academic options.

     

    The bottom line will be unless he can get maried in the next 12 months he has to look at other options and if it was me i would try anything if my heart was set on staying.

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    My 23 year old son is just coming to the end of his first year's working holiday visa and about to apply for this second year. I've just spoken to the migration agent about how he could stay in Australia permanently thinking we could apply for the last remaining relative visa as he has no siblings or parents in the UK & have been informed that he wont be able to stay. The last remaining relative visa takes >10 years & they no longer do a bridging visa so he would have to go back to the UK & wait for his visa or apply for a skilled visa himself & although he did his apprenticeship in bricklaying he has only ever worked as a labourer. The only option he has is to do a degree which is not going to happen as he is not in the least bit interested in studying. He only has his friends in the UK as he's not close to any other relatives so not sure where he's going to have to go back to.

    :arghh:

     

    If anyone knows of any other options please advise.

     

    Thank you

     

    Tracey

     

    Hi Tracey

     

    In the last resort, your son could always become an International Student and study Bricklaying in Oz for a couple of years. There is no reason why he should need to do a degree instead. I'm not convinced that it is possible to do a Bricklaying course in Adelaide. There is one privately-owned college but the course-duration is peculiar, it seems from the CRICOS register, so one would need some specialist advice about that.

     

    http://cricos.deewr.gov.au/Course/CourseDetails.aspx?CourseID=72806

     

    The college in Adelaide is called Salford College.

     

    However, it is definitely possible to do a "suitable" course (one that ticks all the Government's boxes) at Silver Trowel in Perth.

     

    http://silvertrowel.com.au/international-courses

     

    So let us say that your son studies Bricklaying at Silver Trowel for 2 years. He may be able to get employer-sponsorship as soon as he finishes the course but if not, he would be able to get a sc 485 visa insted. The 485 would give him a further 18 months in Oz in order to get some relevant work experience and find an employer who is willing to offer him a job and sponsor him for one or more further visas.

     

    http://www.immi.gov.au/skilled/general-skilled-migration/485/

     

    So that is one possibility, hon.

     

    The other is the question of a possible Remaining Relative visa:

     

    http://www.immi.gov.au/migrants/family/835/

     

    The subclass 835 is the onshore version of this visa. The only thing that might prevent an application for the onshore version is if DIAC have imposed Condition 8503 on any visa that your son might hold immediately before the Rem Relly application is made:

     

    http://www.immi.gov.au/media/fact-sheets/52bWaiving_Condition8503.htm

     

    It would be unusual to attract Condition 8503 on a Working Holiday visa so I don't understand the pessimism of the migration agent whom you consulted. Also, I've heard that Rem Relly visas are taking about 6 years to process. I might be wrong but I don't think it is much as a decade.

     

    In your shoes, I would contact Go Matilda in Melbourne and ask them because whatever they tell you can be trusted to be reliable, up-to-date and accurate:

     

    http://www.gomatilda.com/contact.cfm

     

    Cheers

     

    Gill

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    Guest bigal

    We arrived in 1997,our 19 year old daughter who had a great job and a fantastic social life in the UK had been to Aus a few times staying with her sister, their was no way she was prepared to give up her life to emmigrate with us at that time she thought Adelaide had nothing to offer a night clubbing teenager,thank God she stayed,she owns her own house,car,and is manageress of two branches of Lloyds Bank in problem areas of the West Midlands,now at the age of 34 she wants to sell up and come here to live, trying my hardest not to be negative I have tried to talk her out of it I feel the only place she'll do well is Melbourne or Sydney if she can get a job.

    Anyway last year she applied.............. 10 and a half year waiting list,of course we were shocked I would be 70 when she arrives how could I possibly promise to support a 44 year old woman if I'm struggling on a pension myself, and at 44 is she going to get a job.

    Anyway not all negative she was appointed a case officer, with people dropping off the list for one reason or another her waiting time is down to 5 years,anything could happen in that time,she wanted to come over again in September and has to ask for permission because her application is in.

    Personally I think she should keep her home in England, I guess as a parent i just worry about my kids,I want us to be united,but I want her to be successful and happy.

    For her to come out their is no room for a husband or boyfriend if immigration even think she was trying to get a partner in at a later date her application would be in jepoardy.

    Why do we bring this heartache on ourselves and our loved ones.

    [sorry, the following section is not true I misunderstood my daughter it's just a maybe].

    "[with people dropping off the list for one reason or another her waiting time is down to 5 years]" 2 years have now passed and her remaining waiting time is 8.5 years

    Edited by bigal
    wrong detail

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    If he wants to stay he may have to do some study or course to help him be able to do that. Its not a bad thing if it gets him what he wants at the end of it. Gollywobbler gave some great advice about the bricklaying options. In the grand scale of things learning a trade for a couple of years that will help him stay in Aus surely has to be a good thing for him if he wants to be in Aus long term?

     

    Or he could return to the UK, finish his training and get some work experience there and then return to Aus on his own merits if bricklaying is on the list.

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    We arrived in 1997,our 19 year old daughter who had a great job and a fantastic social life in the UK had been to Aus a few times staying with her sister, their was no way she was prepared to give up her life to emmigrate with us at that time she thought Adelaide had nothing to offer a night clubbing teenager,thank God she stayed,she owns her own house,car,and is manageress of two branches of Lloyds Bank in problem areas of the West Midlands,now at the age of 34 she wants to sell up and come here to live, trying my hardest not to be negative I have tried to talk her out of it I feel the only place she'll do well is Melbourne or Sydney if she can get a job.

    Anyway last year she applied.............. 10 and a half year waiting list,of course we were shocked I would be 70 when she arrives how could I possibly promise to support a 44 year old woman if I'm struggling on a pension myself, and at 44 is she going to get a job.

    Anyway not all negative she was appointed a case officer and with people dropping off the list for one reason or another her waiting time is down to 5 years,anything could happen in that time,she wanted to come over again in September and has to ask for permission because her application is in.

    Personally I think she should keep her home in England, I guess as a parent i just worry about my kids,I want us to be united,but I want her to be successful and happy.

    For her to come out their is no room for a husband or boyfriend if immigration even think she was trying to get a partner in at a later date her application would be in jepoardy.

    Why do we bring this heartache on ourselves and our loved ones.

     

    Hi Bigal

     

    I suspect that my mother feels much the same way as you do. My sister moved to Oz over 30 years ago when she was just 21. She married and Aussie and has stayed in Oz ever since.

     

    Then my father died in 1991, after which Australia became the best place for Mum, so she now has PR in Australia as well.

     

    I opted to stay in the UK. Like your British daughter, I felt that I've always had more going for me in the UK than I would have had if I had followed my sister to Perth. Career-wise, I'd have needed to move to Sydney and I couldn't see the point of moving to Oz at all if I wasn't going to be near my sister. If you have to go trekking around on a plane you might as well fly from the UK, I felt.

     

    I was unexpectedly widowed a few years ago and I have no children. However I do have a half-sister in the UK, so I am not eligible for a Remaining Relative visa.

     

    If I could afford it, would I choose the sc 405 Investor Retirement visa instead? Personally, I wouldn't. In that scenario, I would get an MM2H visa and settle in Malaysia instead, where I was born and brought up.

     

    There's nowt so awkward as Families, it seems to me!

     

    Cheers

     

    Gill

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    If he wants to stay he may have to do some study or course to help him be able to do that. Its not a bad thing if it gets him what he wants at the end of it. Gollywobbler gave some great advice about the bricklaying options. In the grand scale of things learning a trade for a couple of years that will help him stay in Aus surely has to be a good thing for him if he wants to be in Aus long term?

     

    Or he could return to the UK, finish his training and get some work experience there and then return to Aus on his own merits if bricklaying is on the list.

     

    Hi Snifter

     

    I definitely agree that Tracey's son should get some proper trade qualifications.

     

    However, I would NOT encourage him to return to the UK in the foreseeable future. The construction industry is on its knees in the UK. The British Government keeps making Big (but very vague) Promises about how they are "going to" kick-start the construction industry but that is not actually happening so far.

     

    Also, even if the British construction industry does suddenly start to boom, all that will happen is that the UK will become a magnet for all the construction industry workers from the recession-hit countries of the EU, eg Greece.

     

    A few months ago, the British Housing Minister - a guy called Grant Schapps, who is notorious for opening his mouth before he's put his brain into gear - came up with a theory that the many thousands of homeless people in the UK could all live on houseboats on the inland waterways. I've always been involved with sea-sailing but I've never been involved with the inland waterways except as a spectator, so I joined a canal forum in order to discover more about whether Schapps' idea was realistic. Predictably, it wasn't even remotely realistic.

     

    A lady on the canal forum told me that she lives on a canal boat somewhere around Enfield Lock in North London. She said that her area is absolutely FULL of construction industry workers who came from EU countries, believing that they would be able to find loads of construction work in the UK. They got here and soon found that UK Plc has closed down as far as the construction industry is concerned, so there is no work for the existing people from the EU and the dole doesn't pay enough to enable them to afford to go back to their EU countries of origin, either. Apparently they are miserable in in North London because they feel trapped.

     

    So in the (possibly unlikely) event of Cameron actually keeping his promise to kick-start the construction industry, it sounds as if half the workforce for it is already in the UK, with loads more to follow from the EU, no doubt.

     

    Australia is not so daft as to have an open-door immigration policy that just says, "Roll up! Roll up!" in the way that the British Government has been doing for the last decade. There are pretty reliable figures that show WA is going to need an influx of about 40,000 new workers within the next 5-10 years. All these new workers will need homes in WA and they will also need schools, hospitals, shopping malls etc.

     

    So if I were Tracey's son, I'd give serious thought to studying Bricklaying at Silver Trowel in Perth. The elder of my two Aussie nephews has just turned 18 and they live in Perth. Peter has just started at a college in Perth (and it sounds as if he also has an apprenticeship) to enable Peter to become an Electrician. He'll put himself into a position to be able to clean up financially once the Building Bonanza begins over in WA, for sure.

     

    I would recommend the same strategy for Tracey's son. Peter is an Australian Citizen by birth so the training for him will be cheaper than for Tracey's son but for both young men, I reckon that the future lies in Construction and that it lies in WA.

     

    Cheers

     

    Gill

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    Hi

     

    I'm still waiting for Go Matilda to get back to me.

     

    It's definitely not worth him going back to the UK to get another bricklaying qualification, he already has done his 2 years apprenticeship and because the construction industry is on its knees he has always had to work as a labourer. Prior to us moving out here in 2010 my husband who has over 25 years experience as a bricklayer was struggling to keep himself going & had several weeks out of work which he had never in his entire working life done before so for newly qualified bricklayers there is not much hope for them getting the experience.

     

    Thank you for all your advice.

     

    Tracey

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    Gawd love yer, Gollywobbler!! You give so much of your time helping other people, I wonder you find time to live your own life! Unless you're the fastest touch-typist on the planet and have ready solutions for everyone's problems at the touch of a switch, you sure as eggs don't seem to have much me-time for a bit of pampering or even a slow-roast home-cooked meal!! Do you exist on toast or summat? I hope there's someone in your life to catch you if you falter, G. You're definitely a one-off, and I'm certain I'm not alone when I say 'Thank you for caring so much.' I truly don't know how you do it, but I'm glad you do. x

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    My 23 year old son is just coming to the end of his first year's working holiday visa and about to apply for this second year. I've just spoken to the migration agent about how he could stay in Australia permanently thinking we could apply for the last remaining relative visa as he has no siblings or parents in the UK & have been informed that he wont be able to stay. The last remaining relative visa takes >10 years & they no longer do a bridging visa so he would have to go back to the UK & wait for his visa or apply for a skilled visa himself & although he did his apprenticeship in bricklaying he has only ever worked as a labourer. The only option he has is to do a degree which is not going to happen as he is not in the least bit interested in studying. He only has his friends in the UK as he's not close to any other relatives so not sure where he's going to have to go back to.

     

    :arghh:

     

    If anyone knows of any other options please advise.

     

    Thank you

     

    Tracey

     

    Hi

     

    Just to update you on the above post. I took Gollywobbler's advise and spoke with Go Matilda and was advised that we could apply for a last remaining relative visa and that my son should be allocated a bridging visa until they process the visa which has a wait time of 14 plus years. The migration agents who had given me the incorrect advice were the ones we used to process our application (which they did an excellent job & I myself have recommended them after finding them from this website) but unfortunately they then gave incorrect advice re the bridging visa.

     

    We applied for the visa in January and have been granted a bridging visa so that when his working holiday visa runs out he can stay in oz on his bridging visa until they process the application :) such a relief after all the stress.

     

    Tracey

     

    PS: a big thank you to everyone for all your advice :smile:

    Edited by kizzy

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    Hi

     

    Just to update you on the above post. I took Gollywobbler's advise and spoke with Go Matilda and was advised that we could apply for a last remaining relative visa and that my son should be allocated a bridging visa until they process the visa which has a wait time of 14 plus years. The migration agents who had given me the incorrect advice were the ones we used to process our application (which they did an excellent job & I myself have recommended them after finding them from this website) but unfortunately they then gave incorrect advice re the bridging visa.

     

    We applied for the visa in January and have been granted a bridging visa so that when his working holiday visa runs out he can stay in oz on his bridging visa until they process the application :) such a relief after all the stress.

     

    Tracey

     

    That's fantastic news :) So pleased you've been able to work things out and that Go Matilda were able to get you on the right road.

     

    Its a long wait time but at least he'll be able to work and settle into life :)

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    It's so nice when people come back to post with an update, and I'm thrilled that it's good news in this case. Thank you Kizzy for brightening up my Saturday morning :wubclub:

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    Guest simpsona

    Hi, I am new to this Forum and just wondered what else is known about the bridging visas? Fab your son has got one for as long as it takes! x

     

    Basically, we are a family of 5 trying to emigrate to Adelaide, Myself & Hubby & 3 children aged 14,12 & 7. Our problem is that my Mother in Law would be totally alone if we can't get her out there with us as my hubby is an only child and his Father passed away 18 months back. The Parent Visa app would take too long as she is 65 now, we could not afford the other faster Parent Visa, so we are really stumped is there any other way to get her out there and get a bridging Visa to fill in the gap? She would be incredibly vulnerable if we left her behind and could not make the journey alone to visit us either (she is a little bit ditsy bless her and would end up on a wrong plane lol!)

     

    We have always planned to make the move and would be gutted if this hindered our plans. :sad:

     

    May start a new thread with this also actually.

     

    Sharon. x

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    Hi, I am new to this Forum and just wondered what else is known about the bridging visas? Fab your son has got one for as long as it takes! x

     

    Basically, we are a family of 5 trying to emigrate to Adelaide, Myself & Hubby & 3 children aged 14,12 & 7. Our problem is that my Mother in Law would be totally alone if we can't get her out there with us as my hubby is an only child and his Father passed away 18 months back. The Parent Visa app would take too long as she is 65 now, we could not afford the other faster Parent Visa, so we are really stumped is there any other way to get her out there and get a bridging Visa to fill in the gap? She would be incredibly vulnerable if we left her behind and could not make the journey alone to visit us either (she is a little bit ditsy bless her and would end up on a wrong plane lol!)

     

    We have always planned to make the move and would be gutted if this hindered our plans. :sad:

     

    May start a new thread with this also actually.

     

    Sharon. x

     

    Hello and welcome to the forum. I see you've posted a new thread asking about this so hopefully you'll get replies there.

     

    Perhaps chat with a reputable migration agent and see what your options are? Perhaps LRR is an option like happened in this thread.

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    Guest simpsona
    Hello and welcome to the forum. I see you've posted a new thread asking about this so hopefully you'll get replies there.

     

    Perhaps chat with a reputable migration agent and see what your options are? Perhaps LRR is an option like happened in this thread.

     

    Hi Snifter and thanks for the welcome! Really hope there is a way around this, I know many families must be in the same position and everyone's case so important to them but just could not imagine leaving her alone in UK! :sad: If we could apply onshore for a parent visa as has been suggested with a bridging visa to cover the gap that would be amazing! Was trying not to use an agent but to be honest I think our case is too complicated not too.

     

    Sharon. x

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