Rachiegarlo

Egads D:

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    Daughter in the UK is being deprived of Pumpkin soup of any type. She says she has looked in every soupermarket :biglaugh: to no avail.... A little research into Sainsbury's etc tells me it goes by the name of butternut squash..... Hmm hmm everybody butternut squash is PUMPKIN :biglaugh: and is very good roasted if you don't know already.

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    Lol they are different things over here. But Aus English 'pumpkin' is uk butternut squash.

     

    Complicated :P

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    Ah but so many varieties here... Kent, Queensland blue, and taken seriously enough to be made into scones :P too as well as roasted, mashed and souped. Squash are those little yellow things that look like UFOs and taste like nothing with a slimy texture. :biglaugh: Pumpkin is also good once cooked sliced up in various salads and also on pizzas.

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    Butternut squash is the same as Butternut pumpkin in Australia, and can generally be bought all year round in the UK, being sourced from places like Greece or South America.

     

    Big round orange pumpkins are only really sold in the supermarkets in the UK at Halloween time as I remember.

     

    Loads of vegetables are called squash in America, it is in fact a Native American word askutasquash (a green thing eaten raw).

     

    Pumpkin are a type of squash, as are courgettes (zucchini).

     

    Wikipedia says...

    Squashes generally refer to four species of the genus Cucurbita, also called marrows depending on variety or the nationality of the speaker. These species include C. maxima (hubbard squash, buttercup squash, some varieties of prize pumpkins, such as Big Max), C. mixta (cushaw squash), C. moschata (butternut squash), and C. pepo (most pumpkins, acorn squash, summer squash, zucchini).[1] In North America, squash is loosely grouped into summer squash or winter squash, depending on whether they are harvested as immature fruit (summer squash) or mature fruit (autumn squash or winter squash). Gourds are from the same family as squashes. Well known types of squash include the pumpkin and zucchini. Giant squash are derived from Cucurbita maxima and are routinely grown to weights nearing those of giant pumpkins.

     

    In Australian English, the name 'pumpkin' generally refers to the broader category called winter squash in North America.

    Edited by Anne B

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    My favourite salad has pumpkin in - you roast bits of pumpkin in olive oil in the oven, meantime you caramelise red onions in balsamic vinegar in a frying pan. When done, mix pumpkin with onion, including all the cooking juices, and spread liberally over a bowl of mixed lettuce. The balsamic and olive oil combine to make a dressing, the pumpkin is crispy on the outside and smooth on the inside, and the sweetness of the onions and pumpkin combine really well.

     

    You used to be only able to buy the big round pumpkins in the UK around Halloween time, and the flesh is very watery compared to what we can get here. But butternut squash was widely available (they're the ones that are the rude shape, aren't they?)

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