bruce n sheila

Giving Blood

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    I saw an advert at my place of work today wanting people to give blood. I thought I may as well. I did until I took the on line questionnaire. Apparently if you lived in the UK for more than 6 months between 1980 and 1996 you cannot. Strange considering we all went through test to get here and now they are saying our blood isn't good enough!!! Anyone know why this is the case, surely us all having the various tests make us less of a risk than some as we have had a decent medical recently?

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    Mad cow disease.

     

    It's fine, they won't take our blood but they'll give us the ozzies. So it's up to them. I'd like to give blood too, but no go.

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    Yeh likewise! It makes me very cross I must admit - when there are countless other countries that also had/have BSE and just didn't admit it, and even places in the Far East that imported British Beef almost exclusively, yet residents of those places are allowed to donate freely! Whenever I hear the appeals on the radio for blood donors, I shout at the radio it makes my (mad cow infected obviously) blood boil!!

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    Yes - after being here a couple of weeks we went into register and were turned away for having lived in the UK for more than 6 months!!! What really hurt was that my husband has one of the rarer blood types (7% of the world population, I think) and in the UK was specifically invited to come and give blood when supplies were low.

     

    Also rules out all the Aussies that have travelled and resided in the UK of course.

     

    Sarah

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    Guest Helchops

    Gosh, the other half will be gutted - she goes all the time to give blood...although I think she's after the free biscuits to be fair. That is madness though - surely if there are no symptoms since 1996, we're pretty safe no?

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    Guest Helchops

    Apparently, America does the same:

     

    On May 28, 2002, the United States Food and Drug Administration instituted a policy that excludes from donation anyone who spent at least six months in certain European countries, (or three months in the United Kingdom), from 1980 to 1996. Given the large number of U.S. military personnel and their dependents residing in Europe, it was expected that over 7% of donors would be deferred due to the policy. Later changes to this policy have relaxed the restriction to a cumulative total of five years or more of civilian travel in European countries (six months or more if military). The three-month restriction on travel to the UK, however, has not been changed.

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    The human variant of BSE - vCJD - can take many years to show up and there are no blood tests to detect it while it's dormant. That's why they won't take the risk.

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    I was told when I last gave blood in the UK that almost no developed countries will take blood from people who spent time in the UK during this time. It is frustrating but I suppose they have to protect those who get the blood.

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    I was told when I last gave blood in the UK that almost no developed countries will take blood from people who spent time in the UK during this time. It is frustrating but I suppose they have to protect those who get the blood.

     

    You're right - it's not just Aus.

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    The human variant of BSE - vCJD - can take many years to show up and there are no blood tests to detect it while it's dormant. That's why they won't take the risk.

     

    I still don't see why Britain is singled out though - I can't remember offhand if it's Singapore or Hong Kong that imported huge amounts of British beef during the 'danger period' and people who have lived there can still give blood freely! And don't get me started on France and several other European countries who were too cowardly to admit they had detected it in just as large amounts as in Britain....

     

    If they've decided everyone who lived in Britain for the qualifying period during that time must already have it in their blood, perhaps they should have a separate blood bank for all the poms here!!

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    Guest Guest75

    No go as others have said. I was a regular donor of red and white blood ( O neg) in the UK but banned here.

    My drivers license says I can donate organs - so they must be able to flush them???

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    I still don't see why Britain is singled out though - I can't remember offhand if it's Singapore or Hong Kong that imported huge amounts of British beef during the 'danger period' and people who have lived there can still give blood freely! And don't get me started on France and several other European countries who were too cowardly to admit they had detected it in just as large amounts as in Britain....

     

    It isn't so much about mad cow disease being prevalent, it's about the likelihood of the human form of it being in donors in those countries. There hasn't been a reported human death from the disease in Singapore or Hong Kong. Britain had more deaths in one year from vCJD than France has had in its entire history - the vast majority of vCJD deaths in the world have occurred in Britain. In fact, for more than a decade Britain hasn't used plasma from British donors (it imports it from overseas) and all white blood cells are removed from British donors to reduce any risk.

     

    Having said that, NZ doesn't allow migrants from France to give blood (if they were there in certain years) and America has barred pretty much all of Europe, so people from those countries probably have more right to feel aggrieved!

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    Guest ladyarkles

    I must admit, I was pretty disappointed when I found this out, too.

    I was a donor in the UK and hoped to carry on when I got here.

     

    Oh well, guess I'll just have to leave my bits to science.

     

    ~ Rach xx

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