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If anyone is looking for a mortgage broker or financial advisor, we can highly recommend Andy & Stacey at Vista Financial Services, in O'Halloran Hill (www.vistafs.com.au). We recently purchased a house in the Blackwood area, and we used Vista Finance for our mortgage, following a recommendation from a friend. Andy & Stacey were fantastic - so helpful, professional, proactive and responsive - but also very approachable and very easy to work with. They kept a watchful eye on every step in the process and were able to answer all our questions - making the home-buying process much less scary than it could have been.

 

Our situation was complicated due to several factors, and therefore we may not have been eligible for a home loan! But Stacey did an amazing job of putting together a good case for us, which was enough to convince the lender to give us a home loan! Thank you Stacey! We are forever grateful!!

 

Highly Recommended!!

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I'd like to add my praises too, just bought our second home here in Adelaide and can't thank Stacey and Andy enough for all their help, it's not easy buying a house here but to know that Stacey was on the end of the line to answer any concerns we had was great. Would highly recommend them!

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Guest Helchops

I shall be looking up your details when we arrive, find jobs etc. Have you got a website or online business card I could save for when I need it?

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I shall be looking up your details when we arrive, find jobs etc. Have you got a website or online business card I could save for when I need it?

 

 

Hi Helchops

 

We most certainly have, our website is http://www.vistafs.com.au/main/page_home_loan.html, we will be happy to meet when you are ready.

 

If you do wish to contact me our contact details are on the website alternatively feel free to PM.

 

Regards

 

Andy

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