Josie

Good healthcare in South Australia? Especially cardiology?

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    Hello,

    we have had some shocking news in the past week that will mean that we will need to be in touch with the healthcare system over in SA more than we wouldve liked. It's made us question whether we should leave the UK but we know that one bit of bad news is enough so we'd like to stick to our original plans.

    PLEASE can someone explain the Medicare system to me. We have PR visas but we will need to visit the gp and get a referral to a cardiologist over there for MRI scans etc and will also need regular heart medication. Is this going to cost us a small fortune? Also, has anyone had anything to do with cardiology over there- is it well established and as good as the London hospitals? Please help me out with this one as I'm fretting over it quite badly. As if emigrating isn't stressful enough!! Thank you in advance for your help. X

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    Hi there, our son was born with a complex Congenital Heart Defect and we are looked after for many years by the Evelina Childrens Hospital in London where he underwent 4 open hear surgeries. We had our visa for many years before I built up the courage to leave the comfort of his Doctors in the UK and come to Australia. We had a referral from our cardiologist at the Evelina and were lucky enough to be able to see the Consultant our cardiologist referred us to, despite not having insurance when we got here. We see the cardiologist here on an annual basis, our son is now 13 and doing really well. We have been really impressed with the standard of care here and the wonderful support of his cardiologist. I can't comment on the cardiology system for adults but for Children it is fantastic, very thorough - my son has had to be referred to other consultants here and his cardiologist has always been really helpful in steering us through the system.

     

    Hope this helps.

     

    M

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    Guest andylynnchriskirst

    I am worried about a similar issue. Had a cancer scare before leaving uk in June. I will need 6 monthly check ups by acancer specialist but haven'tbeen to a doctor yet. Also onlevothyroxine and have been told prescriptions cost about $35 each time!!!!!! Didn't have to pay anything in uk!! Any advice??

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    I am worried about a similar issue. Had a cancer scare before leaving uk in June. I will need 6 monthly check ups by acancer specialist but haven'tbeen to a doctor yet. Also onlevothyroxine and have been told prescriptions cost about $35 each time!!!!!! Didn't have to pay anything in uk!! Any advice??

     

    Hi, I also take thyroxine and although the prescriptions do cost about that much, each presciption is for 200 days supply of tablets (ie. more than 6 months) as opposed to just one month, so it's not too bad. You have to pay the gap when you see the doctor but I've never had to pay for blood tests. The doctors here seem to have a lot more time for you so the quality of care is very good.

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    You have to pay for most scripts here, eg, last week, 2 of my kids sick, needed different antibiotics for each, cost about $40.

     

    There are often cheaper, generic brands of medication available as an alternative to the brand name on your script and most pharmacists will ask which you want.

    Haven't seen a cardio consultant, but other consultants - if you go through the public system, there is no charge.

    You may find a doctors that will bulk bill you (ie no gap to pay) if they see you regularly, or you may have to pay the gap each time (around $20) depends on your own doctor.

     

    You may also want to note that Medicare has a safety net system, whereby, if you exceed a certain amount in a year, you don't pay anymore. Not sure of the limits or what counts towards taking you up to that limit, but I'm sure if you google medicare safety net you should find that.

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    Our youngest son had a problem with one of his kidneys when we lived in the UK. He had an operation there, but had to have check ups once we moved here. We registered with a doctor here as soon as we arrived, who sent a referral off to the Womens and Childrens Hospital. They were absolutely fantastic, and we didn't have a long wait for an appointment. We didn't pay anything, just used Medicare, which is great.

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    Hi, I also take thyroxine and although the prescriptions do cost about that much, each presciption is for 200 days supply of tablets (ie. more than 6 months) as opposed to just one month, so it's not too bad. You have to pay the gap when you see the doctor but I've never had to pay for blood tests. The doctors here seem to have a lot more time for you so the quality of care is very good.

     

    I took take Thyroxine and my doctor will only give me a month by month supply (5 x repeats but can only be filled a month at a time) which means that I have to pay $35 each month. I have asked for a larger number of tablets in a prescription but she says this is how it is done. I have to see her in a couple of weeks so will mention it again.

     

    Any advise on this would be great.

     

    Thanks,

    M

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    Guest wijaya
    I took take Thyroxine and my doctor will only give me a month by month supply (5 x repeats but can only be filled a month at a time) which means that I have to pay $35 each month. I have asked for a larger number of tablets in a prescription but she says this is how it is done. I have to see her in a couple of weeks so will mention it again.

     

    Any advise on this would be great.

     

     

    My wife is also taking thyroxine. Definetely you should ask your doctor again to give you 6 months supply. If not, find a doctor that would you give one. We are given 6-12 months supply in one prescriptions, without any problems, even without ask asking. I think this is a common policy here. Also, when you are abroad next time, like in Singapore and Malaysia, go the chemist and ask to for Thyroxine. Say you ran out of the medicine while on holiday or whatever. It was cheap there, only cost you a few dollars, probably the same as in Australia or less.

     

    regards

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    I took take Thyroxine and my doctor will only give me a month by month supply (5 x repeats but can only be filled a month at a time) which means that I have to pay $35 each month. I have asked for a larger number of tablets in a prescription but she says this is how it is done. I have to see her in a couple of weeks so will mention it again.

     

    Any advise on this would be great.

    Thanks,

    M

     

     

    I agree with wijaya, maybe you should seek out a different doctor. Even in the UK I had a doctor who would give me 6 months prescription but after we moved the new surgery would only prescribe 1 month at a time (no issue on cost but it was a hassle). When I was pregnant the specialist I saw at the hospital said it was silly to only prescribe a month at a time because thyroxine is a really cheap drug (certainly not worth paying $35 a month for!). You do have to be careful though and keep the tablets in the fridge at all times.

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    When my father in law was visiting from the UK back in 2011, he started to suffer badly from angina. He had previously had two heart bypass operations in the UK and a couple of stents, and he was taken into Flinders Hospital as an emergency while he was here, and ended up having another stent inserted while he was there. The surgeon working on him turned out to be on an exchange programme from the UK, and in fact knew my father in law's usual consultant at Papworth, so I can happily say that the care he recieved here was excellent and on a par with the best in the UK. He had nothing but praise for the way everything was handled here, and didn't have to pay a penny - or a cent I should say (reciprocal agreement with the UK). The specialists here liased throughout with his specialists in the UK, and got notes etc faxed over. Don't know if that helps at all, but just to let you know the cardiac people here are pretty fantastic, just as they are in the UK!

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