Guest deborah

Annual leave and public holidays

    Recommended Posts

    Guest deborah

    Hi,

     

    Am I right in thinking that the average entitlement to A/L is approx 4 weeks?

    I guess it depends where you work. I currently work in the NHS and get 33 days inc the 8 B/H so pretty good.

    I read that you don't need as many holidays as the pace of life is more relaxed.

    Do you have the problem of holidays being more expensive in school holidays (would holiday in oz as weather not an issue)

     

    Debs

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest Libby1971

    Flights between various states in Aus is more expensive than I imagined but that is down to Adelaide being relatively small. Costs during hols are lower I think as going out is cheaper here or free.

     

    Pace of life is slower and quality higher IMO so you may find that not having as much hols okay.

     

    Libby

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Hi Debs

     

    My partner and I were both used to getting 6 weeks leave in the UK so it is a bit of a shock to go back to 4 weeks especially as we love going on holiday.

     

    It is rare to find a job advertised offering anymore than 4 weeks leave and this amount does not increase with service, apart from when you are entitled to long service leave when you usually have to be with an employer for around 10 years.

     

    Where my partner works he has a system where you can take up to an additional 2 weeks leave a year unpaid and they take the money out of his pay each fortnight (people generally get paid fortnightly here).

     

    We are returning to the UK in Sept/Oct to attend my brothers wedding and I have requested extended leave which has been approved but I will have to take 2 to 3 weeks unpaid leave.

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest Rob and Clare

    4 weeks a year for Annual Leave is hard, we have a shut down for Christmas so generally only get 2 more weeks for the rest of the year, it really leaves no flexibility for much holidays throughout the year, we love to travel so find it quite restricting. Just can't wait for the long service to arrive, only 9 years to go... Woo hoo....

     

    Holidays here are generally more expensive, those package tours to the Caribbean or Europe will feel like a distant memory, but saying that, i think to appreciate South Australia or even the whole of Australia then camping is the way to go, after all it's mainly the scenery that's out there to be enjoyed, not all inclusive hotels and theme parks. One of my favourite places so far is Merimbumla (i think that's how you spell it) on the southern new south wales coast, the place is gorgeous.

     

     

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Nurses who work on a rotating 7 day type roster get 6 weeks annual leave. If a public holiday falls into your leave then an extra day is tacked on the end.

     

    The Overland train to Melbourne is cheap, $55 one way and it is now a day service. It takes 10 hours but you see the countryside and you don't have to drive.

    Rachel

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest deborah
    Hi Debs

     

    My partner and I were both used to getting 6 weeks leave in the UK so it is a bit of a shock to go back to 4 weeks especially as we love going on holiday.

     

    It is rare to find a job advertised offering anymore than 4 weeks leave and this amount does not increase with service, apart from when you are entitled to long service leave when you usually have to be with an employer for around 10 years.

     

    Where my partner works he has a system where you can take up to an additional 2 weeks leave a year unpaid and they take the money out of his pay each fortnight (people generally get paid fortnightly here).

     

    We are returning to the UK in Sept/Oct to attend my brothers wedding and I have requested extended leave which has been approved but I will have to take 2 to 3 weeks unpaid leave.

     

     

    Hi Jessica,

     

    Does that include the bank holidays or are they extra?

    My A/L is currently worked out in hours, I am part time and to make B/H fairer they are pro rata so all calculate in together so all in all I get 33 days pro rata. you have to use A/L if they fall on a day that you normally work.

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest graandjac

    One of my favourite places so far is Merimbumla (i think that's how you spell it) on the southern new south wales coast, the place is gorgeous.

     

    A friend of our's (from the uk) has a place in Merimbumla, about 5 mins walk from the inland lagoon, your right it does look fab:). Cheers Graham

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Most jobs only give 4 weeks annual leave plus the public holidays. Also read the small print of your employment contract because it might even say that you need to work there for a year before taking leave!

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest Rob and Clare
    One of my favourite places so far is Merimbumla (i think that's how you spell it) on the southern new south wales coast, the place is gorgeous.

     

    A friend of our's (from the uk) has a place in Merimbumla, about 5 mins walk from the inland lagoon, your right it does look fab:). Cheers Graham

    Are you going to go over there for a visit after settling ?

     

    There is a RSL club with a large decked patio area, overlooking the bay, child friendly and it was the first place i had wedges with sweet chilly sauce....

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest Bex & Nick

    http://www.safework.sa.gov.au/show_page.jsp?id=2483

     

    I get 20 days, which is less than in the UK, and technically I am not allowed to take it until after my first 12 months. However, my office is a bit more flexible than our Melbourne Head Office so I can take time off (as long as I have accrued it). In 9 months, I have taken two days A/L. All I can say is that in the UK I would be climbing the walls without a proper holiday. Here, I am far more relaxed and we can go to the beach at the weekend, and in this hot weather we've been going down after work for a dip too!

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Hi Jessica,

     

    Does that include the bank holidays or are they extra?

    My A/L is currently worked out in hours, I am part time and to make B/H fairer they are pro rata so all calculate in together so all in all I get 33 days pro rata. you have to use A/L if they fall on a day that you normally work.

     

     

    It is 4 weeks plus Bank Holidays or Public Holidays as they call them here.

     

    I used to be a Personnel Officer in the UK and in my opinion generally workplace terms and conditions are a lot better in the UK. However one advantage Australia has over the UK is that legally (over certain earnings) the employer has to pay 9% of your salary into a super (pension) fund and you contribute nothing, so that has to be taken into account when you look at your salary.

     

    Also sick pay is a lot less. I get 10 paid days sick a year, the legal minimum and offered by a lot of employers but you have to accrue the sick days in the same way you have to accrue annual leave, so for example after 6 months of service I would be entitled to 5 days paid sick.

     

    As for maternity pay, if anyone wants a baby and you have time and need the money, have one in the UK. Where I work you receive no maternity pay at all which again is quite common and even the most generous of employers like the universities often only offer 16 weeks pay. You do get a one off payment though when the baby is born.

     

    Also depending on what job you do, part-time, job sharing etc are not advertised very often unless you work in teaching, nursing or manage to get a job in the Government or Councils.

     

    The trouble is that we have got used to living in the UK which is a nanny state, but Australia is very much a country where if you want something you are expected to pay for it yourself which I think is good because that is part of the problem of the decline in the UK where too many people are taking from the system instead of contributing to the country.

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Create an account or sign in to comment

    You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

    Create an account

    Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

    Register a new account

    Sign in

    Already have an account? Sign in here.

    Sign In Now