natasha2106

Getting worried!!!

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    Hi All,

     

    As some of you may already know, we have had a visas granted and we fly out in April 2013. We have our leaving party booked for March and have 3 nights in Hong Kong before arriving in Adelaide. I have our short term rental booked for 4 weeks when we arrive which I am hoping will allow us enough time to visit some areas we like the look of and visit some schools and to find a more permanent rental.

     

    I know I am not the only one - but - I am really starting to feel apprenhensive about the move, I am happy that we have made the right decision to move and that it will be the best option for me, hubby and two girls.

     

    BUT

    My main concern is I am really worried that my husband won't find a job, he is a cnc setter/programmer here and everywhere I keep looking it is showing that there doesn't seem to be much work for him at the moment in oz. My husband is the main earner and will be when we arrive, I will go into work once I have got my children settled into school, (office admin) but I am just really starting to get worried that it may all fall apart with work.

    We live a comfortable livestyle here in the UK we both work very hard and long hours, and the whole move is so we can have more family time with the children, and I know we are moving for all the right reasons.

     

    I think I am just having last minute wobbles :)

     

    Maybe just that it is all finalising, the business has sold and is completing the sale on 4th January, our house has sold and also this completes around 14 - 15th January and the shipping company are coming out end of first week of january. Probably just with everything going through and being completed just making it all a bit more real.

     

    Once my husband has secured work I will definately be more happy - he will start looking and applying for work in February time so that we can get a better look at the job front.

     

    If there are any CNC Programmers/Setters on here who can offer any advice I would be eternally gratefull!!!!

     

    Thank you

     

    Natasha:unsure:

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    Awww, the wobbles seem to happen to just about everyone migrating as the time to depart draws closer. I know I've seen countless times people posting with similar feelings. And replies letting them know it was perfectly normal to think you were bonkers and wonder what on earth were you thinking :)

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    Guest guest8040

    Take comfort in the fact you have evrything tied up in the UK, we fly the same time as you with two kids, no jobs and huge problems with our house/future mortgages here but we are determined to go somehow. As for work I think you have to accept you may have to do something totally out of your comfort zone and on a lower wage to get started. We're prepared to do that but the thing we have in common is that I am TERRIFIED too :)

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    Guest moonraker1959

    Hi,what you are experiencing is all completely normal.Everyone pretty much feels the same,and its the fear of the unknown!People live in their own comfort zones and when you think about being out of that?It can seem quite overwhelming.You mentioned your OH's work?Is your OH concerned about not being able to find a job in his profession?I think you need to have a certain amount of flexibility,especially when you first start out.Perhaps you could be the main breadwinner for a while?No one can predict what your future will hold but you need to move with good faith that all will be as well as it possibly can be,and to a certain extent you have to go with the flow.Harder said than done,but worrying about stuff will not change the outcome.best of luck and hope it all works out for you.

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    Hello we go in January ,

     

    still have no where to live in Adelaide ( have a relocation agent on it)

    not found schools.

    no jobs.

    not sold property here.

    and no money to go with.

     

    benn told it is like gold dust to find a job before arriving there. People want you there.

    so I have accepted my husband probably will not get a job before going,

    He has said he will do anything he has to if he cannot find anything in IT.

     

    so really we are crazy. But, it will all work out- somehow- hopefully!!!!!

     

    Good luck

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    Nearly everyone suffers the jitters before making the move, so nothing unusual there. All I would add is that jobs are thin on the ground here; some people find them easily enough, sure, but many others are struggling at the moment. If you don't need much to live on at first and have enough savings to be able to take 'any' job, then obviously that helps, but once a mortgage is in place etc and a fairly good income is required, then it wouldn't be nice to find yourself out of work in the current climate.

     

    Regarding migrating in order to spend more time together as a family, there have been plenty of discussions about moving across the world to achieve that, including in a thread I started earlier this year, where I mentioned how at one time people chose SA because of the promise of living 'debt free' (when it was cheap!), and how this seems to have been replaced by spending more time with the family:

     

    http://www.pomsinadelaide.com/forum/barbie/30103-quality-life-what-does-mean-you.html

     

    "Living debt free in the short/medium term seems to have been replaced as an aspiration for many Brit migrants to SA by an intention not to 'live to work, but work to live'. Perhaps because they see this as pivotal many set their stalls out accordingly and achieve this, but how much of this achievement is down to being in Australia, and how much is down to simply deciding to live a different way at the same time as making the move? If you're changing jobs, moving house, living somewhere different etc, then it's the ideal time to also introduce some new rules about how you'll live and the hours you're prepared to work. These rules aren't necessarily features of the place you've gone to or of its broader population, but they get associated with it by migrants because they form part of the package of moving there.

    "Put another way, if migrants from the UK work fewer hours here than they used to back in the UK (and not all do, just that many state this as part of their QoL formula) and this is integral to living in Australia rather than coincidental, it should follow that Aussies generally work fewer hours than other nationalities. This, though, simply isn't backed up by any independent measure. International studies repeatedly show that Aussies work some of the longest hours in any developed nation, and take less annual leave because of work pressure."

    If you're determined enough, though, I'm sure it will all work out for you.

     

    Jim

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    Guest Sachertorte

    Agree with Jim.

    Living mortgage free here is pretty much a pie in the sky for most (and if that looks doable once in Australia, then it might well be possible already in the UK with lifestyle arrangements)

    I ALWAYS feel like spending a word of caution for families with pre-school children coming here on 457 or 475 visas- childcare vouchers are not available as a norm here and childcare rebate is only for permanent residents. With no family support (unless of course you are joining other family members living here) this can be a huge issue.

    Also agree with Moonraker- come here with a very flexible mindset- money will "hemorrage" at the rate of knots here and the most sensible thing is to have one of the 2 in employment asap to counterbalance that.

     

    On another note- there is a very American mentality towards work here... The Always On Mentality... we work here far longer hours than we did back in the UK (and need to be available to discuss work ANY time until 11 pm sometimes) and long for the breaks in Europe.

     

    Atypically, we made a point to head to Brighton for a meal the other day and my husband commented afterwards "We live so much for the daily grind that I even forget we have this place down the road"

     

    Moral to the story: It's beautiful here but it ain't the land of milk 'n' honey folks!!

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    Guest Sachertorte

    Wanted to add that I didn't mean to rain on the OP's parade- quality of life CAN be achieved IF financial comfort is de-prioritised and time off work is the highest priority. Many people here have 2 or 3 small jobs or are self-employed to achieve that. The flip side is that you sacrifice your pension and your ability to have disposable income to travel.

     

    Many people on here might agree that they are happier with this deal.

     

    OK- enough air time for me :cute:

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    Guest Helchops

    I couldn't disagree more! I think it all comes down to a bit of luck, what career you're in etc.

    Our experience has been great. I found work prior to coming (had to take a step down career wise - but that's very typical and what I wanted to 'learn the ropes'). My partner has just got full time after five months.

    Income wise, we're much better off than in the UK, we work fewer hours and we really do go to the beach after work and marvel at where we live.

    Paradise is almost always not achievable unless you're going to make a career sailing big boats off the Greek islands; but to us, this is as close as we're going to get whilst having great career prospects and earning good money.

    I can understand that moving isn't for everyone. I think we've been 'lucky' but id like to think the right attitude and real energy has contributed too!

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    Guest Chris_J

    I earn more here and still work 37.5 hours, but also commute more too now so work life balance isn't as good and I'm the only one earning, so loads worse off than 5 years ago. It only took me 3 weeks to get work doing what I want and the weather makes family time better quality being able to go to the beach with a crazy 2 year old :-)

     

    People are saying things will pick up again here, this time of year is slow anyway.

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    Guest Sachertorte

    Yes, Helchops. You are pretty lucky. I am sure you have the right attitude but please allow me to elaborate.

     

    Employability vastly depends on one's line of work and not just on one's luck or "attitude". In some professions board examinations prevent stepping into equivalent careers. I understand you disagree with my post from your perspective, but in general newspaper columns, employment forums, blogs, Forbes, Financial Times etc pretty much agree on what I described (eg it's not just a random statement)

    Ask the teachers, nurses and even doctors. An Australian friend of mine did only her registrar training period in the UK when I met her.. she later returned to Qld. Well, guess what. She could not apply for consultant roles here afterwards and despite being trained in Aus as a consultant GP, she had to resit all the exams as a registrar. It took 2 years and ....a lot of the right attitude and energy to keep sane.

     

    Most importantly the OP: Best of luck!!

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    Guest Helchops

    I can assure you that myself and my partner have both had to sit exams to 'qualify' here in Australia. My partner is a teacher for example - but that's still besides the point! I decided to be proactive, so did all my Australian exams before we'd even got a visa grant - my partner contacted hundreds of schools, physically showed up at loads and offered volunteer work. I was prepared to go into three different career avenues...if needs be.

    I really think the biggest stumbling block to success is that people think they can carry on with their careers where they left off. Some can, but for me and for most, it's just not that simple. Retrain, do something new, work at Kmart if needs be. The right attitude works in this country.

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    Unfortunately nobody has a crystal ball and can predict the future and how things will go for you. In general the Australian economy is slowing down, but that doesn't mean things will necessarily be bad. Unemployment is still relatively low compared to the rest of the western world, but the number of full-time jobs is falling (whereas part-time ones are increasing). The construction sector is going through a bad time. I can't help with any info on jobs in your husbands line of work, but at least you will be arriving after the Christmas/summer slowdown. If you are eligible, get yourself signed up with Centrelink as soon as you can, so that if it takes a while to find work you will at least have some extra money coming in so that you don't spend all your savings.

     

    Be flexible. You could maybe do some temping with an agency until your husband gets a job. The Adelaide job market isn't like the UK so read up on all the past posts on this site to get some tips and pointers. Be prepared for job applications to go totally unacknowledged. Also, with rentals, expect to view some absolute dross that you wouldn't want your worst enemy to have to live in! Enjoy the good things about Adelaide but be prepared to be well outside of your comfort zone at times. This can be exciting (if things go well) or scary (if they don't go well). Emigrating is a huge leap of faith - some lucky ones land on their feet and don't look back, others have a harder time of it, but most of us manage to muddle through. Good luck!

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    Thank you for all your replies.

     

    I appreciate all the comments left. We do have the attitude that we are willing to work doing anything just to start to bring money into the household. I am concerned that we only have a small amount of savings and once this is gone it is gone and I'm worried that we will be left with no money and our dreams in shatters! And we are not expecting to earn loads and work less, we do know that the hourly rate compared to the UK for my husband is much higher in Oz but this is only if he can secure a job in the engineering world. We do also know that he will have to start at the bottom and prove himself and that he won't be able to just walk into a job paying higher than UK straight away.

    My husband has also said that he will work anywhere just to bring money into the pot. We will not be able to buy a house without having a mortgage, but we will only rent for the first couple of years until we find our feet and permanent jobs by then hopefully.

     

    I just feel that the greatest worry is that we will spend our life savings (little that they are) as we are only in our early 30's and end up with no money and no house!

     

    Sorry to keep harping on and I know that many or all of you have probably felt this way at some point during the move, just looking for some reassurance I suppose.

     

    xx

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    Guest Sachertorte

    HI Natasha- it's only natural to look for reassurance. A positive way to look at it is that being in the early 30s is a good time to take a step like this.

     

    It might just allow you time to adjust the course (financially) should any hiccup happen... it's probably worse to lose one's savings later in life!

     

    As far as I am concerned, please feel free to vent your worries :)

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    Guest Chris_J

    My wife and I are in our early....almost mid 30s :-) and we are in a similar situation, a child too so just 1 income and yeah it hurts looking at the figures and we have no life savings just what we have from the sale of the house, while not shabby is not too bad, but that's to use as a deposit when we buy.

     

    my advice is don't worry and concentrate on what you need to do with regards to packing, cleaning and selling and enjoy Christmas with your families. If it was easy everyone would do it, but its not and you are doing it. You may struggle at first but hopefully not for long. It's annoying getting the knock backs but you need to roll with it, and as someone said to me on here need to toughen up, and its true. I took that advice with me. Be persistent and don't be put off by knock backs or unacknowledged applications and find some good agencies, someone on here can surely recommend some in Engineering.

     

    You need to get the can do attitude they like out here and it's all "no worries" ;-) it is hard at first and there's a lot to do but in the long run you will be fine, if your husband is good at what he does someone will take him on

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    Guest gormusoglu

    Hi, I don't know much about anything, and only just starting to try to emigrate to Australia. However, I Have moved from abroad before so I know it is a bit daunting. Also, a friend of mine has just been granted her PR residence for australia and I have just had tea at her house and she is saying the same things. They don't have any assets and are in debt up to their eye balls so trying desperately to pay it all off by the her deadline in September 2013. However, her husband wants to go earlier as if he finds a job it will be better paid then here, and because they do have centrelink so they can claim on arrival. I do think there is quite a good support network out there for low income earners, so don't dispair too much. If you take any old job to see you through for a bit, you should get your income topped up. You can check how much you would be entitled to on the centrelink now before you go. I think it's just getting close and it is a massive move but should be a good one.

     

    With regard to jobs, my immigration agent said something about it being slow over there at the moment because of the elections or something, I might be wrong. However, jobs will pick up in March. Also, someone has already said, face to face you will have a greater chance to find work, it's very hard from here to apply even with a PR.

     

    It's true about hours too. Why people think they will work less over there than here is beyond me. Unless you are down grading your job from manager to white collar or company owner with stress to employed worker with security, I think it is more or less the same. My husband is a carpenter and yes, all the full time jobs that have been advertised have been for 40 hours, as my husband can work 45 on a contract, so thats a bit better. But, by all accounts the Australians work really hard and expect all their workforce to do the same. I simply believe that the weather makes it easier and nicer to spend more quality time together in such beautiful surroundings.

     

    Anyway, I just wanted to say, dig deep, find all the reasons that you are going, and take one big leap! Im sure it will be all fine when you get there and can I just say how very jealous I am and wish you all the very best. Be brave!

     

    My wife and I are in our early....almost mid 30s :-) and we are in a similar situation, a child too so just 1 income and yeah it hurts looking at the figures and we have no life savings just what we have from the sale of the house, while not shabby is not too bad, but that's to use as a deposit when we buy.

     

    my advice is don't worry and concentrate on what you need to do with regards to packing, cleaning and selling and enjoy Christmas with your families. If it was easy everyone would do it, but its not and you are doing it. You may struggle at first but hopefully not for long. It's annoying getting the knock backs but you need to roll with it, and as someone said to me on here need to toughen up, and its true. I took that advice with me. Be persistent and don't be put off by knock backs or unacknowledged applications and find some good agencies, someone on here can surely recommend some in Engineering.

     

    You need to get the can do attitude they like out here and it's all "no worries" ;-) it is hard at first and there's a lot to do but in the long run you will be fine, if your husband is good at what he does someone will take him on

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    Guest gormusoglu

    Forgot to say, which was my main point for posting was try southern cross personnel. They are the only agency that I have come across that deal with overseas recruitment and the only ones that have actually replied to me with some decent advice.

     

    Good luck xx

     

    Hi, I don't know much about anything, and only just starting to try to emigrate to Australia. However, I Have moved from abroad before so I know it is a bit daunting. Also, a friend of mine has just been granted her PR residence for australia and I have just had tea at her house and she is saying the same things. They don't have any assets and are in debt up to their eye balls so trying desperately to pay it all off by the her deadline in September 2013. However, her husband wants to go earlier as if he finds a job it will be better paid then here, and because they do have centrelink so they can claim on arrival. I do think there is quite a good support network out there for low income earners, so don't dispair too much. If you take any old job to see you through for a bit, you should get your income topped up. You can check how much you would be entitled to on the centrelink now before you go. I think it's just getting close and it is a massive move but should be a good one.

     

    With regard to jobs, my immigration agent said something about it being slow over there at the moment because of the elections or something, I might be wrong. However, jobs will pick up in March. Also, someone has already said, face to face you will have a greater chance to find work, it's very hard from here to apply even with a PR.

     

    It's true about hours too. Why people think they will work less over there than here is beyond me. Unless you are down grading your job from manager to white collar or company owner with stress to employed worker with security, I think it is more or less the same. My husband is a carpenter and yes, all the full time jobs that have been advertised have been for 40 hours, as my husband can work 45 on a contract, so thats a bit better. But, by all accounts the Australians work really hard and expect all their workforce to do the same. I simply believe that the weather makes it easier and nicer to spend more quality time together in such beautiful surroundings.

     

    Anyway, I just wanted to say, dig deep, find all the reasons that you are going, and take one big leap! Im sure it will be all fine when you get there and can I just say how very jealous I am and wish you all the very best. Be brave!

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    I sometimes look back at things I worried about about and think what a waste of time! Sleepless nights worrying about what may or may not happen isn't going to make any difference to the outcome, just stress you out. However, don't see it as worrying but planning! Try to think through different future scenarios (what ifs) and plan what you would do in each given situation. Then you will better prepared for all eventualities. My husband is a typical Aussie with a 'she'll be right' attitude and it can be infuriating at times. I'm always saying to him 'didn't you realise that might happen?' Not everything can be anticipated though, we didn't forsee the GFC and the collapse of the $-£ exchange rate happening just at the wrong time for our move back to Adelaide. Who knows what 2013 will bring? Plan as well as you can but don't worry, because it won't help or change the future.

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    Guest jonny no cash

    Hi Natasha,There are jobs out there and your OH should find something keep checking out seek.com especially in the months after Christmas,however I have to agree with Sachertorte long hours are the norm out here in most industries and the laid back barbie on the beach every night lifestyle that some TV programmes portray is out of reach for most people apart from lottery winners,but stay positive it is worth all the stress in the end

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    Guest Chris_J

    Too flipping right it won't change the future, but it may help influence it that's all. You'll realise why you're here when you're here and don't forget there is a great support network in PIA. People are usually willing to meet for coffee etc, especially the ladies here. I think it's like a problem shared is a problem halved etc.

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    Guest adlyn2012

    QUote its about the journey not just the destination! Thats what makes it all worth while, take the good with the bad, what makes us appreciate the good times!

     

    Good luck X

     

     

     

     

    Too flipping right it won't change the future, but it may help influence it that's all. You'll realise why you're here when you're here and don't forget there is a great support network in PIA. People are usually willing to meet for coffee etc, especially the ladies here. I think it's like a problem shared is a problem halved etc.

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