Growler

crime rates in suburbs South Australia

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    Hi everyone, can anyone please tell me where i can find the best place for results for crime rates in adelaide. I have had a look honestly and some of them date back a few years. We will be working at mawson lakes and we have looked at living in modbury and hope valley, highbury etc. Someone has advised us to be careful as to where we live up north and to do our research which is what we are doing now.....

     

    many Thanks!

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    Guest Guest75

    I think you can call the co shops in those areas and they will help you out - Ratters on here posted something about this.

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    Without starting any trouble, when they say UP North its further North than the places you mention.

     

    And Up North is the same as Down South - however many on this forum are from South so won't admit to the same social issues near them.

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    None of those places are what people mean by "north" - these are among what are known as North East suburbs. Crime rates won't tell you anything anyway - some of the most upmarket suburbs may have high crime rates, as after all if you were a thief, would you rather rob a house with lots of good stuff in it, or a place where out of work people lived and were (a) likely to be around much more and (b) likely to have less stuff worth stealing?

     

    What you actually want I suspect is some information on socio-economic groups in various suburbs! Generally look at the selling price of houses in the suburbs you are considering - if a particular suburb looks particularly cheap, there is usually a reason for it. All of those places you have mentioned are fine, as is Mawson Lakes. Wait till you get here and have a look around as it really depends on the type of property you are looking for, your budget, and your requirements in terms of public transport, schools etc.

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    All I can tell you that there have been 18 separate shootings since the start of the year so not a very good start to this year.

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    All I can tell you that there have been 18 separate shootings since the start of the year so not a very good start to this year.

     

    In Modbury, Hope Valley, Highbury and Mawson Lakes?? Gosh, I'm obviously not reading my Messenger thoroughly enough!

     

    Also, very few of those are not bikey-related, so unless you are into organised crime you should be ok

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    Guest Barney Rubble
    None of those places are what people mean by "north" - these are among what are known as North East suburbs. Crime rates won't tell you anything anyway - some of the most upmarket suburbs may have high crime rates, as after all if you were a thief, would you rather rob a house with lots of good stuff in it, or a place where out of work people lived and were (a) likely to be around much more and (b) likely to have less stuff worth stealing?

     

    What you actually want I suspect is some information on socio-economic groups in various suburbs! Generally look at the selling price of houses in the suburbs you are considering - if a particular suburb looks particularly cheap, there is usually a reason for it. All of those places you have mentioned are fine, as is Mawson Lakes. Wait till you get here and have a look around as it really depends on the type of property you are looking for, your budget, and your requirements in terms of public transport, schools etc.

     

    and all the posts below Dianes. . . . . .

     

    in the UK a man bashed his wife to death with a hammer and it made a 2 inch short paragraph in the Farnborough News on page 5, that was 500m from where we lived - i felt safe/rather naieve- here a man/youth killed his mum and step dad the same way and it was front page (15 years ago) there is your perspective, Diane's hit the nail on the proverbial head.

     

    PS

     

    Sorry i didn't get to say g'day at Mandy's do but your kids did you proud :wink:

    Edited by Barney Rubble
    punctuation, sorry cannot help myself

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    and all the posts below Dianes. . . . . .

     

    in the UK a man bashed his wife to death with a hammer and it made a 2 inch short paragraph in the Farnborough News on page 5, that was 500m from where we lived - i felt safe/rather naieve- here a man/youth killed his mum and step dad the same way and it was front page (15 years ago) there is your perspective, Diane's hit the nail on the proverbial head.

     

     

    Wait to see whats in the papers here tomorrow a guy was hitting his mother his father stepped in to stop him and he ended up cutting his head off sound as if it was bad as they are sending all emergancy services for counciling. At least it was not Adelaide it happened

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    I know that when planning a move it's natural to look at all kinds of things, and crime levels are one of these. The reality is, you can be affected by crime anywhere but if you're moving to an economically stable country crime rates are quite low. Adelaide has similar crime rates to the rest of Australia, and Australia has crime rates similar to much of Europe, Canada, NZ etc.

    As a quick read of this thread and others like it shows, what tends to resonate are anecdotes of crime and highly publicised acts, meaning that people's perception of crime in their area is often very different from reality. It's also a subject that raises an emotive response ...

     

    It's actually quite hard to compare crime rates because a) different jurisdictions define and categorise crimes in different ways, b) methods of prevention, reporting and handling vary massively (e.g. in some places, things like assault simply don't get reported), and c) it's hard to find truly comparable places – going off population or GDP alone misses so many other important factors.

     

    In short, for most of the time, crime doesn't touch most of us. When it does, it could happen anywhere! Obviously this is not the case in some developing countries and in more troubled parts of the world where crime is a far more likely event.

     

    In 2010, the Australian Federal Gov started producing an annual state-by-state comparison of a range of things – economic indicators, population, crime, health, education etc – called the State of Australian Cities. All of this can be found in census and ABS stats etc, but this document pulls a lot of stuff together into one place. The 2012 edition has recently been produced and this is from the section on crime:

     

    "Are Australian cities safe compared to other cities around the world? Measuring safety is very difficult and only broad observations are possible. There are a number of ways to compare crime rates between countries. One way is by comparing rates of a signature crime like homicide, which in Australia are the lowest they have been for a century (ABS 1997, Dearden and Jones 2009). On this measure, Australia sits in the middle of the band of countries in northern Europe. There is a similar pattern for both property and violent crime more generally, suggesting that rates in Australian cites, taken as a whole, are about the level of most cities in northern Europe and much safer than many cities around the world (UNODC 2012)."

     

    The full document is an interesting read and can be found here:

     

    http://www.infrastructure.gov.au/infrastructure/mcu/soac/index.aspx

    For an international context, the UN produces a survey of crime trends, comparing 30+ countries in various categories. I've just tried inputting the graphs but they aren't showing. I'll see later if I can add them separately. The general picture they show is that Australia simply doesn't have lower crime than many other places, despite what some migrants might believe. Finally, in answering the OP's original question, SAPOL produces crime stats for the state and in each area:

     

    http://www.police.sa.gov.au/sapol/about_us/statistics/crime_statistics.jsp

     

    Jim

    Edited by jim and adel

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    if you were a thief, would you rather rob a house with lots of good stuff in it, or a place where out of work people lived and were (a) likely to be around much more and (b) likely to have less stuff worth stealing?

     

    I agree with everything you've said (pretty much as usual lol - and I still smile at your emphatic bagging of those ridiculous stick families found on car rear windows:notworthy: !) however, I would add that there is a fair bit of casual, often unreported crime, where kids who want easy money steal from their own neighbourhood.

     

    When we were thinking of buying, we went to our prospective neighbours and asked them. Obviously you will get their personal view and this might include gossip and things way in the past but a) you get to suss out your maybe neighbours and b) you might get some valuable info.

     

    If you imagine coming to South Australia will mean you will be safe and your kids will be able to frolic unsupervised on the beaches, parks and ovals, I think you might be disappointed. Actual life here is pretty much the same as anywhere else...kids get approached, teens get beaten up, people steal stuff, cars get stolen and sometimes even torched, and some people litter, graf and fail to pick their dog's poo up! But I still wouldn't live anywhere else!

     

    LC

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    I don't agree with the view that some criminals are only shooting each other and as long as you're not involved in organised crime you'll be unaffected. Even if I agreed with it, anyone so willing to shoot a rival or anyone they've fallen out with isn't the sort of person you'd want to accidentally shoulder bump in a pub or for your inexperienced P plate son to cut up on the freeway. It's not good that they're walking around amongst us whether or not they 'only' shoot each other.

     

    When there was the shoot-out in the cafe in North Adelaide, someone I know was in there. He said it was bad enough that someone should walk in and begin firing, but he really didn't expect another customer to pull out a gun and start shooting back!

     

    As I say, though, I don't accept that only those involved in organised crime are affected. What these gangs are involved in inevitably affects the community:

     

    – they control the supply of drugs, and drugs habits get funded by break-ins, prostitution etc. It's a trade lucrative enough for people to shoot their way into getting a slice of it and it's paid for ultimately by the community;

     

    – police in Sydney have today stated that teenage boys have been targeted and threatened with violence if they refuse to become involved in trafficking drugs on the gangs' behalf. It's believed that some parents have paid protection money so their kids will be left alone (http://news.ninemsn.com.au/national/2013/02/22/07/00/bikie-crime-up-in-family-friendly-hills);

     

    – the cost of policing the antics of these thugs is enormous, with dedicated teams set up to monitor their activities, special legislation written in an attempt to curb their power, and any number of court cases costing tens of thousands of dollars each (often frustrated by witnesses suddenly failing to appear after being 'persuaded' otherwise).

     

    Who do you think pays for this?

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    Guest Paula H
    I don't agree with the view that some criminals are only shooting each other and as long as you're not involved in organised crime you'll be unaffected. Even if I agreed with it, anyone so willing to shoot a rival or anyone they've fallen out with isn't the sort of person you'd want to accidentally shoulder bump in a pub or for your inexperienced P plate son to cut up on the freeway. It's not good that they're walking around amongst us whether or not they 'only' shoot each other.

     

    When there was the shoot-out in the cafe in North Adelaide, someone I know was in there. He said it was bad enough that someone should walk in and begin firing, but he really didn't expect another customer to pull out a gun and start shooting back!

     

    As I say, though, I don't accept that only those involved in organised crime are affected. What these gangs are involved in inevitably affects the community:

     

    – they control the supply of drugs, and drugs habits get funded by break-ins, prostitution etc. It's a trade lucrative enough for people to shoot their way into getting a slice of it and it's paid for ultimately by the community;

     

    – police in Sydney have today stated that teenage boys have been targeted and threatened with violence if they refuse to become involved in trafficking drugs on the gangs' behalf. It's believed that some parents have paid protection money so their kids will be left alone (http://news.ninemsn.com.au/national/2013/02/22/07/00/bikie-crime-up-in-family-friendly-hills);

     

    – the cost of policing the antics of these thugs is enormous, with dedicated teams set up to monitor their activities, special legislation written in an attempt to curb their power, and any number of court cases costing tens of thousands of dollars each (often frustrated by witnesses suddenly failing to appear after being 'persuaded' otherwise).

     

    Who do you think pays for this?

     

    thats real scary :(

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