Admin

South Australia Population Snapshot

    Recommended Posts

    The Department of Immigration and Citizenship released it's latest 'Migration to Australia's states and territories' report a few days ago. The summary of the report is reproduced first, followed by South Australia specific info.

     

    Information reproduced under Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Australia licence

     

    Immigration to the states and territories

    State and territory distribution of population

    Based on the 2011 Census, more than three-quarters of Australia’s population of 21.5 million people lived in the three largest states—New South Wales (32.2 per cent), Victoria (24.9 per cent) and Queensland (20.1 per cent). The remainder lived in Western Australia (10.4 per cent), South Australia (7.4 per cent), Tasmania (2.3 per cent), the Australian Capital Territory (1.7 per cent) and the Northern Territory (1.0 per cent).

     

    Similarly, more than three-quarters of Australia’s total overseas-born population resided in the three largest states—New South Wales (33.6 per cent), Victoria (26.5 per cent) and Queensland (16.8 per cent).

     

    As shown in Table 1, the proportion of overseas-born was highest for Western Australia (32.8 per cent) followed by Victoria (27.7 per cent) and New South Wales (27.3 per cent). The Northern Territory (18.2 per cent) and Tasmania (12.2 per cent) had the smallest proportions of overseas-born.

     

    Table 1: Composition of state and territory populations by birthplace1

     

    table1.png

     

    Source data: ABS 2011 Census of Population and Housing 1. Excludes country of birth ‘not stated’—total includes ‘other territories’.

    Note: data based on the estimated residential population by country of birth is not available at the stateterritory level.

     

    Due to its long history of migration to Australia, the United Kingdom remained the largest migrant group overall with 20.8 per cent of all overseas-born—a share that is slowly decreasing. The United Kingdom was also the largest migrant group in each state and territory, ranging from 15.2 per cent of all overseas-born in Victoria to 40.4 per cent in Tasmania.

     

    Queensland, the Northern Territory and Western Australia also had high proportions of people born in New Zealand (21.6, 11.3 and 10.3 per cent of overseas-born respectively). Above average proportions of China-born were recorded for New South Wales (8.8 per cent) and the Australian Capital Territory (7.6 per cent), whilst relatively high proportions of settlers from the Philippines (10.2 per cent) lived in the Northern Territory. Of the overseas-born in South Australia, the largest group following those born in the United Kingdom came from Italy (5.9 per cent).

     

    State and territory population growth

     

    All states and territories grew in population in 2011–12.

     

    Western Australia had the highest growth rate of 3.3 per cent, followed by Queensland with 1.9 per cent growth and the Australian Capital Territory with a growth rate just below that, also at 1.9 per cent. Tasmania recorded the lowest growth rate for 2011–12 with 0.2 per cent (Figure 1).

     

    For the seventh year in a row, net overseas migration was the main component of population growth, contributing an additional 208 300 people to Australia’s total population in 2011–12. This was well in excess of the 151 300 people added through natural increase.

     

    Figure 1: Population growth rates—components by state and territory, 2011–12

     

    figure1.png

     

    Source data: ABS Demographic Statistics (3101.0)

    Geographic distribution of recent migrants

     

    Since the 2006 Census over 1 million (1 012 066) new migrants have arrived in Australia.

    Approximately three-quarters have settled in the eastern states of New South Wales (28.5 per cent), Victoria (26.6 per cent) and Queensland (19.4 per cent) while a relatively large number have also settled in Western Australia (15.4 per cent).

     

    Figure 2: Distribution of recent migrants by state and territory

     

    figure2.png

     

    Source data: ABS 2011 Census of Population and Housing

     

    Capital cities have attracted the lion’s share of these migrants (83.9 per cent). Sydney and Melbourne have been the most popular (25.1 per cent and 24.7 per cent, respectively), followed by Perth (13.4 per cent), Brisbane (11.8 per cent) and Adelaide (6.0 per cent). Relatively smaller numbers have settled in Canberra (1.7 per cent), Darwin (0.7 per cent) and Hobart (0.5 per cent).

     

    Recent migrants living outside the capital cities represent 15.7 per cent of the total. Around half these migrants have settled in regional Queensland (7.5 per cent) while a significant proportion have also settled in regional New South Wales (3.3 per cent). Western Australia and Victoria’s regional areas have also proved attractive with equal shares of 1.9 per cent each.

     

    Geographic representations

     

    Compared with the existing population, recent migrants represent 4.7 per cent of the Australian total, 6.0 per cent of those living in capital cities and 2.2 per cent of people living in regional areas.

     

    As Figure 3 shows, Western Australia has a significantly higher proportion of recent migrants (7.0 per cent) than other states and territories, while Tasmania has a considerably lower proportion (1.8 per cent).

     

    Figure 3: Representation of recent migrants by state and territory

     

    figure3.png

     

    Source data: ABS 2011 Census of Population and Housing

     

    Across the capital cities, the largest proportions of recent migrants are in Perth (7.9 per cent) and Melbourne (6.2 per cent). Brisbane and Sydney have the third highest shares with 5.8 per cent each, followed by Darwin (5.7 per cent), Adelaide (5.0 per cent), Canberra (4.8 per cent) and Hobart (2.4 per cent).

     

    In the regional areas, Western Australia again has the highest proportion of recent migrants (3.8 per cent). There are also significant proportions in Queensland (3.4 per cent) and the Northern Territory (3.0 per cent). For the other states and territories the proportions are similar and in the order of 1.3 per cent (South Australia, Tasmania and New South Wales) to 1.4 per cent (Victoria).

     

    State or territory of intended residence

     

    Permanent additions in 2011–12 were at the highest level ever with 245 270 people—31 861 more than in the previous year, and an increase of 9.2 per cent on the previous peak in 2008–09. The increase in 2011–12 was primarily driven by a 24.7 per cent increase in offshore settler arrivals (158 936 people), with both offshore and onshore numbers at record levels. This growth was mostly a result of a larger Migration Program with considerable growth in offshore arrivals in the Skill Stream, which increased by 20 894 people on the previous year. Significant to this growth was the contribution of the Skilled Sponsored, Employer Sponsored and Skilled Independent visa categories. Growth in the Skilled Sponsored category accounted for 55.7 per cent of the total offshore increase in the Migration Program.

     

    For the first time since 2008–09, permanent additions in 2011–12 grew across each state and territory (Table 3). Numerically, the largest increases were in Western Australia (up 8678), Victoria (up 7508), Queensland (up 5694) and New South Wales (up 4290).

     

    Table 3: Number of permanent additions by state and territory, 2008–09 to 2011–12

     

    table3.png

    Source data: Permanent additions, DIAC 1. Includes ‘not stated’ and ‘other territories’.

     

    As shown in Table 4, New South Wales, in 2011–12, has maintained its position as the most popular destination for new migrants with a share of 28.9 per cent, a share that has been gradually declining since 2006–07. The next most popular destinations were Victoria (25.1 per cent) and Queensland (18.4 per cent). However, it is Western Australia that has in recent years grown significantly, increasing from a 13.2 per cent share in 2006–07 to a 17.7 per cent share in 2011–12.

     

    Table 4: Proportion of permanent additions by state and territory, 2006–07 to 2011–12

     

    table4.png

     

    Source data: Permanent additions, DIAC 1.

    Excludes ‘not stated’ and ‘other territories’.

    Permanent additions by category

     

    As shown in Figure 4, the composition of permanent additions varied by jurisdiction.

     

    In 2011–12, the proportion of Family migrants was greatest in New South Wales (33.9 per cent of all its permanent additions). In contrast, Queensland and Western Australia had the lowest proportions of Family Stream migrants (19.0 per cent and 15.6 per cent respectively).

     

    The Australian Capital Territory (64.8 per cent) pipped South Australia (62.8 per cent) to have the greatest proportion of Skilled Stream migrants. For most other jurisdictions, the skilled migrant share was between 42.2 per cent and 59.6 per cent. Queensland had the lowest share with 39.3 per cent.

     

    Tasmania received the highest proportion of Humanitarian Program entrants—27.5 per cent of its migrants for 2011–12 compared with between 4.6 and 10.9 per cent for other jurisdictions.

     

    It is also notable that more than one-third of permanent additions to Queensland were New Zealand citizens—between two and seven times greater than the proportions for other states and territories.

    Figure 4: Permanent additions by category to the states and territories, 2011–12

     

    figure4.png

     

    Source data: Permanent additions, DIAC

    1. Includes ‘not stated’ and ‘other territories’.

     

    Source countries

    In 2010–11, the People’s Republic of China overtook the United Kingdom to be the main source country of permanent additions. This meant, for the first time since 2002–03, the United Kingdom was not the main source country of new migrants to Australia.

    In 2011–12, there were further shifts. New Zealand (30 102) became the main source country, followed by India (28 310), the People’s Republic of China (26 744) and the United Kingdom (26 161). Table 5 shows the top three source countries of permanent additions in 2011–12 for each state and territory.

     

    Table 5: Permanent additions by top three countries of birth for each state and territory of intended residence, 2011–12

     

    table5.png

     

    Source data: Permanent additions, DIAC

    1. People’s Republic of China

     

     

     

    Population Snapshot - South Australia

     

     

    table25.png

     

    Source data: ABS—Demographic Statistics (3101.0), The 2011 Census of Population and Housing; DIAC—Permanent additions, OAD Statistics and The Stock of Temporary Entrants

     

    Population size and change

     

    At the time of the 2011 Census:

     

    • 7.4 per cent of Australia’s population lived in South Australia
    • 6.7 per cent of Australia’s overseas-born population lived in South Australia
    • 23.2 per cent of South Australia’s population was born overseas (compared to the national average of 26.1 per cent)
    • people born in the United Kingdom (34.6 per cent) and Italy (5.9 per cent) were the two largest overseas birthplace groups in South Australia (Table 26)
    • other major countries of birth for South Australia were India, the People’s Republic of China and New Zealand.

    Table 26: Change in overseas-born population by major countries of birth—SA, 2006 and 2011 Census

     

    table26.png

     

    Source data: ABS 2006 and 2011 Census of Population and Housing

     

    In 2011–12, the population of South Australia was estimated to have increased by 16 546 people (Figure 27), a 1.0 per cent growth rate—slightly below the national growth rate of 1.6 per cent. The state was estimated to have gained 7629 people through natural increase and 11 274 people through net overseas migration. There was an estimated loss of 2357 people from net interstate migration.

    Figure 27: Components of population change—SA, 2002–03 to 2011–12

     

    table27.png

    Source data: ABS Demographic Statistics (3101.0)

     

     

    Geographic distribution of recent migrants

     

    A total of 66 164 migrants have recently settled in South Australia. This represents 6.5 per cent of all permanent migrants who arrived in Australia between January 2007 and the night of the 2011 Census. These recent migrants account for 4.1 per cent of South Australia’s total population, below the national average of 4.7 per cent.

     

    Adelaide has attracted the vast majority of South Australia’s recent migrants – 61 007 people or 92.2 per cent of the South Australian total. Compared with the total population of Adelaide, this represents 5.0 per cent, below the average of 6.0 per cent for all capital cities. As Figure 28 shows, the areas within Adelaide which have attracted large proportions relative to their existing population include Adelaide City (21.1 per cent), Port Adelaide East (9.4 per cent) and West Torrens (8.6 per cent).

     

    The number of recent migrants living outside the Greater Adelaide area was 4932. This represents 8.1 per cent of the total for South Australia and 0.5 per cent of all recent migrants living outside Australia’s capital cities. Regional areas of the State which have attracted the largest numbers relative to their existing population are the Outback – North and East (2.0 per cent), Murray and Mallee (1.9 per cent) and the Eyre Peninsula and South West (1.3 per cent).

    Figure 28: The population distribution of recent migrants, SA and Greater Adelaide

     

    table28.png

     

    Source data: ABS 2011 Census of Population and Housing

     

    Permanent additions to South Australia

     

    In 2011–12, there were 14 570 permanent additions to the South Australian population (Table 27). The main birthplaces of these new migrants were the United Kingdom, India, the People’s Republic of China, the Philippines and New Zealand.

    Table 27: Top 10 source countries—SA, 2011–12

     

    table27a.png

     

    Source data: Permanent additions, DIAC 1. Includes country of birth 'not stated'.

     

    The Skill Stream accounted for almost two-thirds (62.8 per cent) of South Australia’s permanent additions in 2011–12 (9151 people). A further 2899 people were from the Family Stream, 1581 from the Humanitarian Program and 906 from Non-Program migration—mostly New Zealand citizens (833 people).

     

    South Australia recorded a 24.3 per cent increase in permanent additions in 2011–12—the second largest number since the peak of 15 241 permanent additions in 2009–10. As Figure 29 shows, up until 2010–11, South Australia saw a decade of growth in permanent additions, rising from just over 4000 in the early part of the decade, increasing rapidly in the middle of the decade and eventually peaking in 2009–10. The decrease in 2010–11 of 23.1 per cent was the largest decrease both in percentage and absolute terms across all jurisdictions.

    Figure 29: Permanent additions by category—SA, 2002–03 to 2011–12

     

    table29.png

     

    Source data: Permanent additions, DIAC

    Family Stream permanent additions

     

    The 2899 Family Stream permanent additions for 2011–12 were 12.3 per cent more than the 2581 recorded in 2010–11.

     

    The People’s Republic of China accounted for 447 (15.4 per cent) of these permanent additions. Other major source countries were the United Kingdom (10.0 per cent), India (9.9 per cent), the Philippines (9.2 per cent) and Vietnam (6.4 per cent).

     

    More than four-fifths (80.6 per cent) of Family Stream permanent additions in 2011–12 entered Australia under a Partner visa category. Parents accounted for a further 11.5 per cent of these new migrants and the remaining 7.9 per cent was made up of other family categories—such as Carers, Unaccompanied Minors and Aged Dependent Relatives.

    Humanitarian permanent additions

     

    In 2011–12, South Australia received 1581 permanent additions under the Humanitarian Program (Figure 30). Of these, 985 were accepted under the offshore protection component, either as refugees (863 people) or under the Special Humanitarian Program (122 people). A further 596 people were granted visas onshore.

     

    Of those settling in South Australia, 17.2 per cent were born in Iran, 17.1 per cent in Afghanistan, and 11.0 per cent in Myanmar.

    Figure 30: Humanitarian permanent additions by category—SA, 2007–08 to 2011–12

     

    table30.png

     

    Source data: Permanent additions, DIAC

    Skill Stream permanent additions

     

    South Australia received 9151 Skill Stream permanent additions in 2011–12, up 28.6 per cent on 2010–11 (Table 28). About one-third of these (33.2 per cent) entered under the Skilled Sponsored visa category. Other major skilled categories were Employer Sponsored (27.1 per cent) and State/Territory Sponsored (19.3 per cent).

     

    Most Skill Stream permanent additions to South Australia were born in one of five countries: the United Kingdom (22.9 per cent), India (18.6 per cent), the People’s Republic of China (9.9 per cent), Sri Lanka (5.2 per cent) and the Philippines (5.1 per cent).

    Table 28: Skill Stream permanent additions by category—SA, 2009–10 to 2011–12

     

    table28b.png

     

    Source data: Permanent additions, DIAC

     

    Temporary movements

     

    Overseas visitor arrivals

     

    In 2011–12, South Australia attracted over 100 000 visitors, a 2.7 per cent share of all Australian visitors (3.7 million) for the year (Figure 31). This represented a 3.2 per cent increase on 2010–11, which was above the national increase of 0.5 per cent.

    Figure 31: Overseas visitor arrivals—SA, 2002–03 to 2011–12

     

    table31.png

     

    Source data: OAD Statistics, DIAC

     

    International students

     

    The number of international students in South Australia at 30 June 2012 was 18 830, down 6.6 per cent on the end of June the previous year (Figure 32). On the basis of citizenship, most students came from the People’s Republic of China (5960), India (2570) and Malaysia (1600).

    Figure 32: Stock of students—SA, at 30 June, 2004 to 2012

     

    table32.png

    Source data: Stock of Temporary Entrants, DIAC

     

    Temporary Business (Long Stay) residents

     

    There were 3580 people (1810 Primary Applicants and 1770 Dependents) granted Temporary Business (Long Stay) visas in South Australia in 2011–12. This represented a 2.9 per cent share of the national total and, compared with the previous year, was an increase of 5.6 per cent (Figure 33). This rise in grants was not, however, as pronounced as the national increase of 38.8 per cent.

     

    Figure 33: Business (Long Stay) program grants and stock (at 30 June)—SA, 2004 to 2012

     

    table33.png

     

    Source data: IMIRS and the Stock of Temporary Entrants, DIAC

     

    The number of Temporary Business (Long Stay) visa holders present in South Australia at 30 June 2012 was 5100. Most were citizens of the United Kingdom (1200 visa holders), India (620 visa holders), the Philippines (510 visa holders) or the People’s Republic of China (420 visa holders).

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Create an account or sign in to comment

    You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

    Create an account

    Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

    Register a new account

    Sign in

    Already have an account? Sign in here.

    Sign In Now