kildorragh

The other side of the coin

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    Good morning,

     

    Just want to dispel a few concerns that new arrivals may have in relation to the job market. The majority of references to new jobs appear to default to 'It's who you know - not what you know'. Yes that does occur, but it's the same in London, Manchester or Perth.

     

    I applied for two govt jobs and purposely didn't ask any locals to review the cv or 'put a good word in'. Got accepted for both.

     

    The good wife did the hard yards one week and handed in copies of her cv to a number of local hotels (accommodation) - none of which were advertising. She got a call the next week and ended up running the place. She's now working at a 5 star hotel in the hills - another job snagged with no 'local' involvement.

     

    If you put yourself about, have the confidence in your ability, you will find work.

     

    Good luck.

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    Guest Guest75

    Too true!!

    You cannot rely on anyone or a "system" here.

    Be self confident and rely upon yourself a little.

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    Well done.

     

    Every job I have had in the 6 years I have been here (and I have had a few as I do a lot of contract/project work) has been on my own merit and without anyone putting in a good word for me. I have also gained jobs that I have never worked in before and had no experience in the industry in, my resume got me an interview, but my personality got me the jobs. So as you say, it can be done.

     

    I think a lot of it depends on the industry you work in and what demand there is for those roles. If you work as a mechanic, cook, hairdresser, in aged care, IT (depending what your specialism is) you should be able to pick work up fairly easy.

     

    My partner works in IT and I have mentioned on this forum previously that if he were to lose his job tomorrow I am confident he would gain work easily. His skill set is in demand. However I have been working with a recent migrant who has an IT background but their skill set is very specialised and it has taken 3 months for the person to secure work, but I was always confident they would secure work as they have a great attitude and approach - this goes a long way.

     

    I often read posts on this forum where people are struggling for work and just from the posts I can tell that perhaps they don't have the best attitude/approach and this will come across in an interview and put a recruiter/interviewer off. I often sit and think if only they would do this or apply to this organisation etc they would be ok, but people have to be open to honest feedback and some people don't want to hear it.

     

    I often mention in my posts, that gaining a job in Adelaide can also be down to being in the right place at the right time, there are no hard and fast rules.

     

    When we emigrated I had lived over here before, but my partner hadn't. The one piece of advice I gave him was "get in a job and show them what you can do and you will go far". That has certainly been the case in his experience and he has a good job that he enjoys and earns good money, he would not have had the opportunities he has had if we had stayed living in the UK.

    Edited by Jessica Berry

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    There really are plenty of positive stories like this. Spent a lot of time lurking on this site over the past right years and repeatedly read about the doom and gloom of the job market. Me and the missus are not special - but we are proof that the right attitude eventually wins.

     

    If you are a good nurse, butcher, cleaner or whatever - you will find work. Just don't expect it to be handed to you on a plate. You can't be head-hunted if no-one is aware your head exists. Go for any job in your chosen field, get the job and let nature take it's course. The one saying that does apply is that it's easier to get a job when you have a job. Take anything in your field to bring in the money and then pick and choose. Prove your worth through actions.

     

    Sermon over. I promise.

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    I'm confused!lol Its great things have worked out for you,but I have just read another thread thats saying jobs are becoming harder to come by,and unemployment figures are rising?:err:

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    I agree that attitude is everything. When we moved here, over 9 years ago now, my dad's biggest concern was the fact that neither of us had jobs - Roy said to him "I'll cut grass with a pair of scissors if that's what it takes to feed the family" and I seriously believe he would have. He got the first job he applied for and is still there. He started as casual on 20 hours per week and worked his way up to permanent full time and ultimately to leading hand. And all this was based on his willingness to do what it took to keep the money coming in. He knew no one when he applied and has worked to where he is now thru sheer determination.

     

    As for there being no jobs - I agree that it's is probably not as easy as it was 9 or 10 years ago but if you are prepared to do anything, to start with at least, there are jobs to be had - Roy works for IGA in their warehouse and they are employing all the time - admittedly most of the roles are casual but if you are any good they will move you to full time eventually. Again this is down to attitude and quite often being prepared to start at the bottom like Roy did and working your way up.

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    I agree that attitude is everything. When we moved here, over 9 years ago now, my dad's biggest concern was the fact that neither of us had jobs - Roy said to him "I'll cut grass with a pair of scissors if that's what it takes to feed the family" and I seriously believe he would have. He got the first job he applied for and is still there. He started as casual on 20 hours per week and worked his way up to permanent full time and ultimately to leading hand. And all this was based on his willingness to do what it took to keep the money coming in. He knew no one when he applied and has worked to where he is now thru sheer determination.

     

    As for there being no jobs - I agree that it's is probably not as easy as it was 9 or 10 years ago but if you are prepared to do anything, to start with at least, there are jobs to be had - Roy works for IGA in their warehouse and they are employing all the time - admittedly most of the roles are casual but if you are any good they will move you to full time eventually. Again this is down to attitude and quite often being prepared to start at the bottom like Roy did and working your way up.

     

    I respect that attitude and reckon that if someone is willing to do 'anything', there are certainly jobs still to be had.

     

    We're all different, though, and for me, I wouldn't have come here to do 'anything'; I came here on a skilled visa based on my occupation where there was apparently a skills shortage (senior manager in HR), and that's what I expected to do. The trade-off for me is that unlike many on here I'll not match my earning here to what I was on in the UK (and nowhere near what I could have potentially earned in the future). This might be different in Sydney or Melb, but we chose Adelaide knowing and accepting the trade-off. I also geared myself up to work at a lower level - which is just as well because I am! - but still in my profession.

     

    We like it here (don't 'love' it and might not be here long term), but the deal for us isn't and never was that we'd do 'anything' to be here - we don't like it that much! We had good jobs and lifestyle in the UK and came for the experience of living in a different place, not because we hated where we were or were struggling.

     

    Jobs are certainly thinner on the ground here than they were when we arrived, with more skilled people chasing fewer positions and moving outside their chosen profession. If that suits them, if that's their trade-off to be here, great. Even better if that's what they expect before they make the move, because then they won't feel cheated about the 'shortage' they were expecting.

     

    Jim

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    Agree with you Jim - life's a continual trade off. Made the move over here to give the kids a better future. We're worse off financially as the pension I could have taken next year can no longer be touched for 13 years. Job - another trade off. Enjoying what I do but lost 25 years of reputation. Friends - another trade off - everyone over here only knows about my life over the past 7 yrs.

     

    BUT

     

    The kids are thriving big time. Me and the lady will continue to trade off with a smile on our faces.

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    Good morning,

     

    Just want to dispel a few concerns that new arrivals may have in relation to the job market. The majority of references to new jobs appear to default to 'It's who you know - not what you know'. Yes that does occur, but it's the same in London, Manchester or Perth.

     

    I applied for two govt jobs and purposely didn't ask any locals to review the cv or 'put a good word in'. Got accepted for both.

     

    The good wife did the hard yards one week and handed in copies of her cv to a number of local hotels (accommodation) - none of which were advertising. She got a call the next week and ended up running the place. She's now working at a 5 star hotel in the hills - another job snagged with no 'local' involvement.

     

    If you put yourself about, have the confidence in your ability, you will find work.

     

    Good luck.

     

     

    I initially thought when I read this post you were a recent arrival but after reading your further posts I think you have been here a few years, am I correct? Are you talking about the jobs you secured 7 years ago when you first came?

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    I'm confused!lol Its great things have worked out for you,but I have just read another thread thats saying jobs are becoming harder to come by,and unemployment figures are rising?:err:

    Hahaha! That's very true lol!

     

    I think unemployment figures can be a glass full / empty kind of thing.

     

    Realistically, higher figures mean more competition ( and possibly for fewer hours, worse pay etc) but for every 27% of kids who are unemployed there must be around 73% that are lucky enough to have jobs*.

     

    I am sure kildorragh's attitude made a difference. However, I don't think they were playng on the same playing field as people today. Jessica Berry, who is in a good position to judge, repeatedly states attitude is important but in a time of fiercer competition for fewer jobs surely it is only one part of what will get you the job?

     

    I personally think kildorragh's message really is that, even in conditions of higher unemployment, it is possible to find work so don't give up your dreams.

     

    But be prepared. The employment market is not what is was 7 years ago, or five or four or even two years ago. Good luck.

     

    LC

     

    * I realise that assumes all kids are looking/in employment so please don't be too pedantic, hopefully you get the point I am trying to make lol

    Edited by Lazy Cow
    Argh! What keeps happening to my font etc? I blame the stupid iPad!

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    Jessica Berry, who is in a good position to judge, repeatedly states attitude is important but in a time of fiercer competition for fewer jobs surely it is only one part of what will get you the job?

     

    But be prepared. The employment market is not what is was 7 years ago, or five or four or even two years ago.

     

    You are absolutely right. You can have the right attitude (which is important) but if your resume is rubbish you won't even get a look in.

     

    Again, I agree about the job market. The employment situation is very different now to say 12 months ago and like you say certainly different to a few years ago.

     

    On the subject of youth unemployment, I used to work as a Recruitment Coordinator at a training provider and we used to be inundated with jobs for the students (these were genuine, good jobs at reputable companies), but very few were interested in the jobs, I used to have to ring the employers back and say no one was interested. There are two sides to every story.

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    Jessica, arrived seven years ago but the Commonwealth jobs were in 2011 and 2012 - separate agencies. The wife started work in 2009 but got her current job towards the end of last year.

     

    The thrust of the message was to not believe that all migrants are way down the pecking order when the Job Fairy sprinkles her dust although LC does have a point when referring to attitude.

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    Guest HRMC

    As a rule of thumb, the idea that jobs are unavailable or available depends on your industry of choice and varies throughout various months of the year.

     

    Stay positive, seek assistance where you can and be as prepared as you need to be to ensure you achieve employment success.

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    Realistically, higher figures mean more competition ( and possibly for fewer hours, worse pay etc) but for every 27% of kids who are unemployed there must be around 73% that are lucky enough to have jobs*.

    I know I run the risk of being one of those pedants your asterisk was meant to deter, but if it was a percentage point or two I wouldn't respond. The fact is, less than 65% of young people currently participate in the workforce, so they're the only ones being measured; therefore, it's 73% of that 65% that have jobs, meaning there are a lot more young people without work than the unemployment figures by themselves would suggest!

     

    Pedantry over! Jim

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    To claim being successful in Adelaide only with the right attitude is not only rubbish but dangerous! Sorry, but I completely disagree with that opinion.

    I know many people with the right attitude and not having a (good) job! Of course, part-time or production work or refilling shelves in supermarkets. But a lot of these employees are highly educated and really have a excellent skill set but in Adelaide to make ends meet many people do any job they could get (last year when we came is was even impossible to get a job at IGA/Foodland or so, they prefer students because students earn much more less than an adult).

    Don't get me wrong, my husband and me have well paid jobs but we know that this is not true for everyone. It is true finding a job, but neither staying in in a casual position (which is unsecure work) nor finding more suitable, superior jobs due to lack of jobs in Adelaide and the mentioned competition. Many professionals do 'odd jobs' in order to survive.

    Hubby, for example, found a job in his occupation only 3 weeks after we arrived last year. Than he lost his job due to restructuring measures in the automotive industry but quickly found another one. Even with our very positive approach (I'm a successful community support worker and earn above the rate since I upgraded my skills) our future in Adelaide is strongly depending on Holden's decision in September. And the future of Adelaide's automotive industry will not be decided in Australia, the fate of Adelaide's North and therefore 1000's of families lies in the hands of Holden managers in Detroit/US. See and read it in the Advertiser from last Saturday. The newspaper even admitted that SA is in a recession.

    Comparing a few years ago and even with last year the labour market here in Adelaide is nearly dead, it's far too quite in the new financial year which normally is very busy.

    So please don't give new arrivals false hope.

    Last year we already thought it was very quiet on the job market but now the whole job market is fallen asleep, besides aged care, car mechanics and other jobs 'in high demand'.

    Everyone can check on seek.com.au and compare jobs advertised in Melbourne, Sydney, Perth. I promise everyone here you will find dozens of opportunities compared to Adelaide. Okay, in the metropolitan areas are living more competitors but people have much more opportunities as well.

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    I have seen families struggle to get in to the job market, one very high up member even applied for jobs stacking shelves and didn't get an interview, another applied for McDonalds and didn't get through. I think it is a case of what your occupation is and being in the right place at the right time. Oh and not forgetting the its not what you know but who you know.

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    Australia 7 years ago, especially SA, is not the same nowadays.

    A 'right attitude/approach' nowadays is having persistence, consistency and before I forget the most important thing having financial capacity, otherwise people will crash-land. I started from scratch, even with my positive attitude no one here was interested in my skill set when I arrived here. Of course nobody was due to lack of jobs and moreover I had no MYOB/Payroll experience (but every employer want admin officers to have that, hundreds of applicants to choose from) and too many competitors. My survival strategy was starting something new, a job in 'high demand' which was related to the aged care sector, a job not for everyone. But in order to make a living migrants have to compromise, that was true hundreds of years ago for migrants and still is (when you ask skilled migrants who came over 40,50 years ago).

    The success story of the topic starter is really nice but doesn't sound realistic for many new arrivals.

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    Not got a wide circle of friends over here but know of eight other poms that have been as lucky as me. Guess we all got sprinkled by the fairy.

     

    I apologise for leading you up the garden path - we all took the last remaining jobs in SA.

     

    All the best,

     

    Yosser

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    I know I run the risk of being one of those pedants your asterisk was meant to deter, but if it was a percentage point or two I wouldn't respond. The fact is, less than 65% of young people currently participate in the workforce, so they're the only ones being measured; therefore, it's 73% of that 65% that have jobs, meaning there are a lot more young people without work than the unemployment figures by themselves would suggest!

     

    Pedantry over! Jim

     

     

    You had to do it, didn't you?!:confused::biglaugh:

     

    (although it was certainly a scarily interesting fact, so thank you ...but still very grr baby!)

     

    :smile: LC

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