Rabeah

SA Immigration lowers requirements for State Sponsorship

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    Recently I surfed the Internet and found out that SA Immigration had already lowered the conditions in order that new migrants can obtain State Sponsorship more easily (Cit.: We've made significant changes to our applications).

    But it was not what I would have been expected. Not established in a logical sense or looking for high qualified specialists, no, no reversed, more a flip-flopping back to a English requirement (IELTS) of a 6 only and work experience of 1 year only.

    I cannot tell you all how shocked I was!!! We came here as non native English speakers with a 6.5 (spouse) and 7 and found it hard at the beginning. With a 6 only I reckon it would not be easier for new arrivals!!!

    And the most ridiculous fact is that they reduced the work experience requirement. It is even hard to get work in SA with heaps of work experience when you are from overseas. However, everyone knows how difficult it is for people with no or little local work experience to secure work.

    Of course, this government only wants to lure new migrants to come here and take them to the cleaners.

    I've come to the conclusion that they only want their cash and assets, they know better that we've a recession and no jobs and now they lure semi-skilled and semi-English speaking people to migrate.

    Edited by Rabeah

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    But.... To pass the skills assessment most people need more than one years work experience. The only people who this is likely to help is people who have studied in Australia who often have a slightly different skills assessment (less work needed).

    For most people this won't make much difference at all.

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    Guest Rachael M Bowen

    I don't feel that the Government is wanting to fleece money out of migrants I actually think that they want to ensure that people coming into Australia are able to sufficiently fund themselves which takes it away form their purse strings, which to be honest I can't blame them.

     

    Coming from the UK and being an English native speaker I too had to achieve 7's for 190 or 8's 189 in the IELTS and prove between 8-10 years working experience within my profession in order the attain the 60+ points for the EOI. Also July this year the visa fees changed, which now you have to pay so much for each person going on the visa application. I would therefore guess that those who are wanting to migrate will also have to be financially able to do so. I would then presume that these people would have skilled/ professional backgrounds to earn enough to be able to afford all the fees.

     

    As for the employment status in SA, I have subscribed to SA health, careerone and seek, my profession appears to have ample of working opportunities so I don't feel I am being lured in by false pretences'. From the outside looking in I would say that SA are trying to ensure that those coming in to the state are able to enrich their economy. But hey, you as residents may know otherwise and I am wearing rose tinted spectacles.!!!!!

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    The only people who this is likely to help is people who have studied in Australia...

    Sure? It's quite hard to study in Australia (where, AFAIK, English is the language used at school) and can't get at least a 7 at IELTS.

    I don't comply at all with the line choosen by the SA immigration department. I think that migrants must have a good property of language and strong skills in order to represent an added value to the Australian resident workforce.

    Edited by Petrus

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    Sure? It's quite hard to study in Australia (where, AFAIK, English is the language used at school) and can't get at least a 7 at IELTS.

    I don't comply at all with the line choosen by the SA immigration department. I think that migrants must have a good property of language and strong skills in order to represent an added value to the Australian resident workforce.

    You would think wouldn't you. To get onto my course they needed 5 in IELTS. I ran into an Indian lad the other week who I studied with and was telling him how good him english is now. He was telling me that for the first six months he hardly understood a word. Some people's English hardly improved the whole course. They found people from their own country and just chatted with them. Lots of my course was practical, course work or any tests they could retake until they passed. The Indian people on my course though found it easier to just cheat rather than retake. To the point that I made an official written complain to Tafe that they were letting it happen, and my qualification would have no value when employers realised other people on the course didn't know a thing.

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    To get onto my course they needed 5 in IELTS. I ran into an Indian lad the other week who I studied with and was telling him how good him english is now. He was telling me that for the first six months he hardly understood a word. Some people's English hardly improved the whole course.

    This shouldn't be allowed, especially if the course is a fast lane to get a PR visa! And I'm a non native speaker, mine is absolutely a non-racist opinion.

     

    ...my qualification would have no value when employers realised other people on the course didn't know a thing.

    I perfectly agree with you, it will happen and that's exactly why I blame the SA immigration for its new policy on state sponsorship: the easier is to get a visa (or a TAFE certification) the less it will be considered, and this will damage all migrants.

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    I agree it shouldn't be allowed. They actually dumbed down some of my course as they said the non native speakers wouldn't understand it! There were only two non English speakers with good English on my course. One Chinese and one Indian. The rest would all nod their heads and either do the opposite of what they were told or start asking their mates what had been said. It was hugely frustrating at the time, for us as well as the lecturers. The IELTS should have been higher in the first place for students.

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    IELTS is important and shouldn't be lowered again, I've seen also at a training provider with many Iranians like Blossom mentioned, they only talk in their mother tongue. I and other migrants who only spoke English felt nearly offended because they had an English only policy in place which nobody of this group took any notice of and moreover their English hardly to understand (of course, they never speak, listen or watch English). So these people gathering together in their socio-ethical group are probably at risk finding a good job and complaining about not being and not feeling included in Australian society later.

    Since we arrived we only read and listen to English TV programs/newspapers/movies and sometimes my spouse and I talk English with each other (actually we started to mix our 'old' language with English) in order to improve and also speak to our own people from our socio-ethical group in English (often when other ethnics are around) because this a sign of courtesy, inclusiveness and respect.

    I will never understand why people are coming to an English speaking country and don't adapt which makes life so much easier.

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