srg73

What is the best age to make the move?

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    Still being in the UK and having valid 189 visa, I wake up each morning with slightly different thoughts about the move. These vary from where are the cases and let's go this minute to would I be better to stay!

     

    The whole reason for our move would simply be to experience one of life's little adventures like friends and members of my family have done. One big consideration is age. Being 40 I have lived a full life in UK, experiencing most of what UK has to offer, nice holidays good friends etc. However I'm keen this continue and the move to Australia is a great opportunity to do this. Each time we visit it feels right, it's just being brave (or stupid) and taking the plunge.

     

    40 though! Yes I've done a lot and would leave with few regrets although parents are getting older, my levels of energy is good but starting over again even though we have a good amount of equity?

     

    What age did you set sail and what advantages are there to being 40 with no kids?

     

    S........Mr mid life crisis about 10 years too early!

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    Still being in the UK and having valid 189 visa, I wake up each morning with slightly different thoughts about the move. These vary from where are the cases and let's go this minute to would I be better to stay!

     

    The whole reason for our move would simply be to experience one of life's little adventures like friends and members of my family have done. One big consideration is age. Being 40 I have lived a full life in UK, experiencing most of what UK has to offer, nice holidays good friends etc. However I'm keen this continue and the move to Australia is a great opportunity to do this. Each time we visit it feels right, it's just being brave (or stupid) and taking the plunge.

     

    40 though! Yes I've done a lot and would leave with few regrets although parents are getting older, my levels of energy is good but starting over again even though we have a good amount of equity?

     

    What age did you set sail and what advantages are there to being 40 with no kids?

     

    S........Mr mid life crisis about 10 years too early!

     

    Hello SRG73,

     

    I read your post as I was 40 in May and my husband is 39 in January ...... and just wanted to say we can't wait to make the move!! If anything we feel if we didn't do it soon, it would get toughter to make the move in year's to come. We've also got the PR visas (will be 2 years in March since they were issued!). Feel just like you in terms of our life up until now in the UK, but we believe Oz has more to offer us in the future than the UK (we have researched and had a reccie over to Adelaide last August), and are both ready for a change. It's a big old world! Also, having both lost our fathers in the last few years, it makes you realise how short life is, and we feel very lucky to have this opportunity. If we didn't make the move now, we'd always regret it and wonder what if?

     

    If anything we wish we'd perhaps been just a few years younger, but then again on the career front, reckon we both have a strong level of professional experience to offer now which will hopefully make it a bit easier to secure decent jobs in our respective fields. We're also now due to have our first baby in February, so it just feels like a natural next step for us now for our little family. Even if we didn't have the baby on the way now, we would still be making the move.

     

    Hope that helps, emigrating is a complex process full of emotions and doubts, but i guess you just have to consider them all, be honest with yourself and go with your gut instinct.

     

    Petal :wink:

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    Guest cazzie

    I came out at 51 on a spouse visa. I don't think age matters, but maybe attitude/positivity does. You have to give it time - I hated the first year but now i love it here. Mind you, I do ping pong back to the UK every six months for 6 months! Good luck and don't worry - everyone gets nervous about making the big move but most of us settle eventually and it is a great lifestyle :)

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    I moved at 43 but with kids although they weren't the reason for moving - adventure was. We had never considered moving here until my wife was approached by a university and a job offered so it wasn't a life long dream. I enjoy it. Financially it may take a couple more years to catch up to where I was in the UK but who cares? Generally the good outweighs the bad. Yes I have some guilt about leaving aged parents but thats not a situation that can be compromised and there is a distinct lack of culture but I wouldn't move back, or not to the UK anyway.

     

    I came with the view that is everything went tits up and it really was Hillbilliesville then I'd just get a flight and live somewhere else. I'd loose money on the whole deal but I'm not an accountant so I wouldn't loose sleep over it.

     

    The constant underlying theme on many postings is whether moving here is a good idea. Only the poster can answer that but if it turns out to be a bad idea then just return to the UK after a month, year or decade. Failing is just not having the balls or motivation to do something rather than making a (retrospectively) bad choice. ............this reads a bit like I'm getting at people - I'm not, I'm just saying moving here was not a major decision. Having kids, splitting from previous lovers, being freelance - they were major decisions. Moving somewhere thats a flight away rather than a drive away wasn't major at all.

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    I moved at 43 but with kids although they weren't the reason for moving - adventure was. We had never considered moving here until my wife was approached by a university and a job offered so it wasn't a life long dream. I enjoy it. Financially it may take a couple more years to catch up to where I was in the UK but who cares? Generally the good outweighs the bad. Yes I have some guilt about leaving aged parents but thats not a situation that can be compromised and there is a distinct lack of culture but I wouldn't move back, or not to the UK anyway.

     

    I came with the view that is everything went tits up and it really was Hillbilliesville then I'd just get a flight and live somewhere else. I'd loose money on the whole deal but I'm not an accountant so I wouldn't loose sleep over it.

     

    The constant underlying theme on many postings is whether moving here is a good idea. Only the poster can answer that but if it turns out to be a bad idea then just return to the UK after a month, year or decade. Failing is just not having the balls or motivation to do something rather than making a (retrospectively) bad choice. ............this reads a bit like I'm getting at people - I'm not, I'm just saying moving here was not a major decision. Having kids, splitting from previous lovers, being freelance - they were major decisions. Moving somewhere thats a flight away rather than a drive away wasn't major at all.

     

    Well said spanners :notworthy: I was 44 when we 1st arrived with 2 children of working age, we did not arrive with any thinking of going back, just knew we could if we wanted to, no guilt trips or emotional blackmail with family, 2 of our children decided to come with us (the 3rd was already had his own family life) their life, their choice, like it was with me and my good lady. If we decide ever to go back then we go, and start our life again, you can move around in England and not settle and want to move back, the only difference is, like spanners says, the cost which in reality is not a big deal unless you want to make it so.

    We enjoy life here in OZ there are many differences to the UK, if we dwell on those differences instead of embracing them then yes you could say it was a bad choice in life, but not a life ending one, surely!

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    Very interesting post/thread and I agree heartily with spanners.

    We are 39 and 40 with no kids and none planned. We instructed our migration agents last week and hope to be granted a 190 visa based on my fiancées occupation. The decision not to have children was made on the condition that we would fill that gap with something that was just as meaningful for us, and that was travel. We are realistic though, Australia isn't the be all and end all, nor is it the promised land....we aren't the type of people who's heads are full of the idealistic view that everything is going to be so much better than the UK, that we can get a speedboat, huge house and walk to work!!! BUT, it is a lovely place to explore and find out more about has some amazing wildlife and great geography and it will not be a hardship for us to spend time there and explore. Who knows, if we don't like it, we will come back to the UK and start again, knowing we gave it a shot. It's better to have done something in life and regretted it, rather than not done it at all. Life is supposed to be an adventure, I'd rather leave this mortal coil with experiences and memories rather than a pocketful of cash!!

    as for your question about the advantages of being 40 with no kids, well I won't fill up the page here (!), but I will say that I seriously doubt we would be able to be so laissez faire about the whole thing if we had them. The decision not to has meant we are able to concentrate solely on us and what makes us happy, without having little people to worry about, and for us, that's enough to make the move....

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    I'm 42, my wife 40, and our daughter is 20 and married so we're virtually with no kids.

    I think that this is a great condition to make the move,.

    At fourty you are experienced about life, more than when you were thirty, and you are healty more than when you'll be fifty.

    You know all the details of living in Europe, you exactly know what it means to go on your way, so if you decide to change your life you can do it with no regrets, because you're not missing new experiences here, you're simply catching new ones on the other side of the planet.

    I think that, since we have a one way ticket on this world, we should do our best to live it all.

    In fourty years we had a loooong time to read the "Europe" chapter of the book named Earth, and it's a good moment to turn the page and start reading another page.

    I'm flying to Australia in fiftyfive days and I'm really looking forward to start this new experience, I wish all the best for me and for everyone who is doing the same in this moment of life, OP included.

    See ya downunder!!! :biggrin:

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    40!! that's no age I'm 49 and my partner is 42 and will be making the jump in Feb 14 with 2 kids one of 3 and the other only due next week, we also have nice life in uk with large house and good jobs both earning over 50k each but as the saying goes "life is to short and your a long time dead", i'm looking forwards to enjoying the rest of my life in Oz and giving our children the all year round outdoor lifestyle, what's the worst thing that can happen, you don't like it and you come home having had a long holiday, as someone once said to me its better to have tried it and failed than to fail to try, don't find yourself too old and wishing you had done it, because I can promise you if you don't do it you will regret it.

     

    Go for it

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    It can be easier when you are young as you tend to have less ties and be more open to new experiences.

    It can be harder when you are young as you are less mature, and may miss home more, especially if it is the first time you have left the comfort of home and family.

    It can be harder with kids as you have to consider them as well as you - schools, childcare, babysitting, friendships - everything is much more complicated.

    It can be easier with kids as you make friends through them, schools are a central point of the community and a good way to meet people and get involved.

    It can be harder when you are older as you may have become more resistant to change over the years and less willing to compromise.

    It can be easier when you are older as you have more money and know better what you want out of life.

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    It can be harder when you are older as you may have become more resistant to change over the years and less willing to compromise.

    It can be easier when you are older as you have more money and know better what you want out of life.

     

    Yep, that's me! both case's, I am a grumpy git with a bit of spare change in his pocket:confused:

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    Hi all,

     

    We're about to put our application for a 489 visa in and one day I want to the next all I can think is why am I moving things aren't too bad here. Although I would love to give it a try I'm afraid of making a big mistake what if we don't settle or don't like it. The one positive thing is there are a lot more opportunities for me and the kids as there are very few here in Ireland and this recession seems to have no end in sight. I know that we should go it just having the balls and going for it.

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    I'm 42 (43 on Friday!) and Sharon is 39 and we depart our comfy, (relatively) successful life in England on 28th Dec for one simple reason - to go on an adventure. The job I have is for 3 years and we'll see how things pan out regarding if we stay but as mentioned by a couple of others, you can never regret giving it a go and for us we think at our time of life and with no kids to disrupt then now is the perfect time. We had a meal with the in-laws the other week and my father in law was telling me that he always has a regret that he never took up a job offer in South Africa 'cos of the age of his kids and not wanting to unsettle them - his words to me was now, I will never have that regret.

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    Thanks for the replies especially from all of you of a similar age and mindset. I feel that now is likely to be our last chance and just want to make sure that it is the correct choice as we will be investing a lot of emotions and hope into this. We are about to break the news to family and hope for a positive response especially considering everybody is well at the moment. We are a little concerned about giving up good jobs (40% tax payers although not saying much given continued dropping of threshold) but we work long hours with high levels of pressure and little time for life.

     

    My biggest doubt is work but hey I will go and work in Burger King rather than stay at home and being 40 we have earned a good level of equity so should have firm financial foundations when we move. On that subject, anybody live in Unley and if so, would you recommend it as seemed about right for us.

     

    Thanks and now for work!

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    We had a meal with the in-laws the other week and my father in law was telling me that he always has a regret that he never took up a job offer in South Africa 'cos of the age of his kids and not wanting to unsettle them - his words to me was now, I will never have that regret.

     

    My parents next door neighbours got the opportunity many many years ago to move to Canada as the husband was offered a job there. His wife would not go because she didn't want to leave her mother. I always got the impression that both of them ended up regretting that decision and they never stopped moaning and complaining about the UK until the day they died. One of their sons ended up migrating to America and has lived there for years, he probably grew up knowing of his parents regrets and didn't want the same regrets.

    Edited by Jessica Berry

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    We set sail aged 28 and 33. We had to wait until my OH had 6 years work experience in his role to meet the visa conditions to apply. As soon as he had the 6 years we applied and as soon as the visa came through we got the wheels in motion to go. Our property settled on the Friday lunchtime and we left the UK on the Monday! We were keen to get over here and start building a new life. To me you either want to go or you don't, everyone is usually in the same position we all give up jobs, homes, cars, friends, families and a life that is comfortable and familiar and take a leap of faith coming over here. We sold our property just at the right time and despite a friend in the UK predicting that property prices were going to double in the next 5 years (I think they must have been living in a different place to the one I was living in!!!) and people saying "are you going to rent your property out just in case you don't like it", we sold up lock, stock and barrel, selling most of our furniture to the lady that bought the property and we took the equity and ran! The property market crashed not long after we left and has continued to struggle. Nearly 7 years later, we could go back and buy our UK property for a third less than we sold it for. Thank goodness we didn't hang around.

     

    Everyone is different and I am not saying it is the case with everyone, but some observations I have made is the older someone is the more 'successful' they might be in their career. This translates to a higher salary, perhaps a company car and the lifestyle that goes with the higher salary. Some people (not all) then find it harder to come over here and start again and they may have to take a step back in their careers. People often say they are prepared to do anything, but the reality is often not the case and it can be very demotivating for people. If you come when you are younger and perhaps not so further along in your career it can be an easier transition as there are more jobs at this level than at management level. On the flipside I have met people that were working at a higher level in the UK and genuinely have no desire to work at that level over here and have had career changes and are very happy.

    Edited by Jessica Berry

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    We are only just starting the ball rolling, applying for a 190 visa (with Kirsty, my wife's job and experience) We are 36 and 33, feel like we are wading through proverbial treacle in England. We came to Adelaide on a recce last month and just about all boxes were ticked. I have a fair bit of experience travelling in Australia and know the country and its customs well.

     

    To answer the thread, obviously any age is a good age, but there is probably no doubt that under 40 is a better time to do it all the same. But, everyone and their circumstances are different.

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    We are only just starting the ball rolling, applying for a 190 visa (with Kirsty, my wife's job and experience) We are 36 and 33, feel like we are wading through proverbial treacle in England. We came to Adelaide on a recce last month and just about all boxes were ticked. I have a fair bit of experience travelling in Australia and know the country and its customs well.

     

    To answer the thread, obviously any age is a good age, but there is probably no doubt that under 40 is a better time to do it all the same. But, everyone and their circumstances are different.

     

    Welcome to the forum.

    Edited by Jessica Berry

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    Guest hmz_d

    I am 30 and my wife too. I think golden age to immigrate is under 30 because people could change yet and reform in new society. Just homsick bothers a little bit specially missing close family.:sad:

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    "It can be harder when you are older as you may have become more resistant to change over the years and less willing to compromise.

    It can be easier when you are older as you have more money and know better what you want out of life".

     

    Age doesn't matter - positive attitude and determination to make it work have been the key for us. We were in our 60s when we arrived.

    We are NOT resistant to change and have embraced a whole new and exciting life here. Most of our new friends are Aussies but we do meet up with other Poms too. We have also met many other migrants - some of them really doing it tough (boat people) and we are grateful to be permanent residents with a safe and secure future unlike others who face uncertainties and real persecution if they have to return to their old countries.

     

    Yes, we know what we want out of life and every day in this great country is a bonus. Sadly, we do not have much more money. We used our life savings to pay for the Visas ($30,000 each plus a $10,000 returnable bond) and we arrived when the exchange rate was crap. But, as I keep saying I'd rather be poor, happy and near the family then poor and miserable back in the UK!

    Edited by jtct

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