TonyD

from -4 to +40

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    I have had a few emails and seen a few comments on here warning to "be ready for the heat". Whilst the obvious (and manageable with common sense) like sun burn/sun stroke/dehydration can be prepared for, there must be several issues for the body going from extreme cold to extreme heat.

     

    With several P.i.A posters due out in the next few weeks and some with young families I think any advice from the guys who have been through the experience would be appreciated.

     

    Tony

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    Guest Claire-n-tel

    Hi Tony!

     

    Medically there is no issue for a healthy person going from cold to hot temperatures, your body will remain within a degree or two.

     

    I think the problems could be down to people arriving here and really not appriciating / believing about the strength of the sun. During the ashes a couple of weeks ago there were many overseas lobsters walking around!

     

    You really will burn here, even if you have never burnt before, that pesky hole in the ozone will get you every time!

     

    We recently had some friends who had family over from the uk, thier 15 year old daughters went off to the beach with their factor 10, dispite being warned and supplied with factor 30, declaring that they usually "use factor 4 in spain" They spent the next 2 weeks nursing their blisters and feeling sorry for them selves.

     

    Whatever you think do not go off to the beach or park in the middle of the day and always use at least factor 30 (you will still get a tan using it)

     

    Oh......Remember to drink lots, pref water not coffee tea coke etc

     

    Claire

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    To be honest, it's not a huge issue unless you have a job where you have to work outside. Generally you go from an air-conditioned house, to an air-conditioned car, to an air-conditioned office.. so it's only a short while between that you really get hit with the heat! If you are not working, you can go to an air conditioned shopping mall or cinema on the worst days, but we don't ever get more than a few days in a row over 40.

     

    We have never, ever had our air conditioning on overnight since we've been here. We are lucky in that we get gully breezes in the evening so when the air con is on during the day we keep all the windows and doors shut, and occasionally the curtains too n the rooms we're not in, then at night we turn it off, and open all the windows to get a breeze through. If you are really hot at night you can try the old trick of wetting a sheet to sleep under - done that a few times (it's your own personal evaporative cooling system) and we always keep cold water in the fridge (it's a really dry heat here - or wine...wine works too for some of us!)

     

    Plenty of sun cream, good sunglasses (boy, it's bright sometimes), a hat (a must for the kids - many schools have summer 'no hat no play' rules) and lots of loose light cotton clothes with long sleeves - I did sit next to a lovely English lady at the Ashes who had a vest-style top on, and shorts - so much skin exposed: I ended up lending her a spare shirt to put over her legs as I could almst see them getting redder and redder...

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    It depends on how used to the sun your skin is as to if you burn. I work outdoors, and after winter will indeed burn.

    By now though I had factor 30 on my face from straight off today (I only started wearing it on my face last week), on my arms from about 10am, and none on my legs at all with short shorts on. No burn. I don't wear hats.

     

    I came from winter in the UK to a 40c heat wave and I do remember thinking 'what have I done? How on earth am I going to work outside in this?'. Physically I was fine, but it was certainly a shock. I felt far worse for my dog who had her coat left long as she had a couple of days in the kennel before the flight (and hates cold) and then had a month of 40c type temps. Every time we phoned they said she was hardly eating anything. Not surprising really.

     

    Ice blocks help SO much with coping with the heat.

     

    The only thing bothering me now is the ducted air con in my new house keeps tripping! Phone call to agent tomorrow. :-/

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    With working in construction I will be out in the heat but being office based I can always come back in the office if I'm struggling. With regards to looking like a lobster, been there and my wife will not buy anything other than factor 30 for me since the since I won the "reddest lobster in Malaysia" title!

     

    Sleeping under a wet sheet sounds wierd but im sure its not if you're so warm!

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    Sleeping under a wet sheet sounds wierd but im sure its not if you're so warm!

     

    You kind of wring it out so it's just damp ... or moist... rather than dripping wet:wink:

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    We invested in a decent high UV rated rash vest and bathers for our son. A set with the legionnaires style hat. Plus we have a few kiddy sun hats and small spare sun cream tubes stashed in the car, my handbag and so on. Top up if we are out then.

     

    Also we all wear sunglasses pretty much all the time in the sun. And I invested in a UV rated hat. Love wearing it.

     

    Agree with the others about how hot the sun is. That hole in the ozone above Aus makes it much harsher than we are used to coming from the NH.

     

    Get used to doing the Australian salute to keep brushing the flies off ;)

     

    I also tend to get up earlier when it's hotter and eat a bigger breakfast than I usually do as have no real appetite in the day when it's this hot. I also like to keep things like watermelon in the fridge for snacks. Cold and refreshing. Son loves the stuff.

     

    I've found it manageable so far. We don't have air con here in our house, so it's defo warmer than places with it. I don't relish these higher temps but we are careful re sunscreen, covering up, drinking water and so on. It's more things like remembering to put the screen in the windscreen so the steering wheel doesn't burn my hands when I get back to the car, those little things I am getting used to.

     

    You'll maybe feel like you are melting if it's this hot when you arrive and walk out the cooled airport. It's like a wall of heat hitting you I think.

     

    Defo don't hit the beach in the middle of the day. We go earlier in the morning or evening after 6pm. We are making use of the outdoor pools around and about, they have good shading over the kiddy pools and also Tusmore park as it has a covered paddling pool (it's a big one) so kids can be in it and shielded from the sun.

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    Talking to remembering things... I drive a golf cart at work and today jumped onto the brown vinyl seat at full pelt in short shorts! Ouch!!! Remember to sit in the shade! And I burnt my legs a couple of times on metal which had got mega hot in the sun.

     

    I don't seem to suffer much with flies though.

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    Also remember that you never go from 4 to 40 anyway.

     

    You go from 4 degrees outside Heathrow, to 18 degrees inside Heathrow, to 18 degrees on a plane, to 18 degrees in your stopover airport, to 18 degrees on your next plane, to 18 degrees in Adelaide Airport, to 40 degrees outside Adelaide Airport.

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    Guest Guest12727

    Outside workers generally down tools when it exceeds about 35 degrees.

     

    Having a cold water shower (water will be warm!) just before bed and not drying yourself is another trick. Ceiling fans in bedrooms are a must, they make a huge difference, especially on those hot, still nights. I think we had one of those last night!!

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    Guest Guest75

    Yep, ceiling fans are the way to go for nights, cheap as chips to run.

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    I'm currently running 3 ceiling fans in the entertainment area to keep mother Blackbird cool. I even spray her with water occasionally.

    Wonder if she appreciates it.

     

    037-Xmas lights.jpg

     

    Merry Christmas everyone.

    Edited by DougM

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    that pesky hole in the ozone will get you every time!

     

    Claire

     

    Not sure the hole in the Ozone is the issue, in 2012 it was at it's smallest recording for 20 years, so it is getting better.

     

    The earth though does have an elliptical orbit, which means that during the southern hemisphere summers we are millions of miles nearer the sun. Whether this causes the sun to be stronger I didn't read any further, I was amazed we didn't all fry that as we were that much closer.

     

    800px-Seasons1.svg.png

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    Not sure the hole in the Ozone is the issue, in 2012 it was at it's smallest recording for 20 years, so it is getting better.

     

    The earth though does have an elliptical orbit, which means that during the southern hemisphere summers we are millions of miles nearer the sun. Whether this causes the sun to be stronger I didn't read any further, I was amazed we didn't all fry that as we were that much closer.

     

    800px-Seasons1.svg.png

     

    Slightly misleading diagram there. It looks on the diagram like the earth is twice as close to the sun in southern summer than southern winter, but if you look at the distances it's actually only 5million km (just over 3 million miles) closer, so if drawn to scale you wouldn't really notice much difference at all. Still an interesting fact though.

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    Not sure the hole in the Ozone is the issue, in 2012 it was at it's smallest recording for 20 years, so it is getting better.

     

    The earth though does have an elliptical orbit, which means that during the southern hemisphere summers we are millions of miles nearer the sun. Whether this causes the sun to be stronger I didn't read any further, I was amazed we didn't all fry that as we were that much closer.

     

    800px-Seasons1.svg.png

     

    Southern hemisphere summers are cooler than northern (taking the same lines of latitude) because of the amount of ocean there is in the south. The perihelion effect means about 5-6% more heat at that time of year but this is offset because of the cooling effect of all that water.

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    Some great tips there, if you see a red-in-the-face bloke with milky white legs walking around Adelaide on 29th Dec it'll be me so come say hello!

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