Guest The Pottertons

Cotton Wool Kids

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    Guest The Pottertons

    Hi there all, As with a lot of you parents i imagine the prospect of a better childhood for our kids is a big motivating factor to migrating- So how does the cotton wool kid generation of the U.K compare with the typical childhood in Oz. Do you feel safe enough to let your kids go out to play, walk or cycle to school etc. Im really keen for my children to have a childhood like mine where we could go out and play and not be stuck in front of the tv or computer! Any thoughts would be gratefully appreciated, Thanks

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    Guest Libby1971

    I nearly had a heart attack wandering around the school that my kids went to. One PE class was doing a team building exercise - they had to get their group from one side of the field to the other walking across chairs etc, we all did it as kids I expect, but it got banned in the UK as being a Health and Safety risk.:err:

     

    My daughters friend rode her the other day after school - she lives in another suburb. It must be a good ten mins bike ride and her mum didn't think anything of it.

     

    My two girls walk to and from school. Or they did till hubbie resigned and now he will take them to and from which is nicer in the cold/ wet weather.

     

    I hope this helps answer your question. :jiggy:

     

    Libby

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    Guest Django

    This is one of the main reasons we wish to bring up our children in Oz. Children here aren't allowed to be kids. They can't go off and explore with their mates and do stuff like we used to.

     

    Pete

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    Well not every one lets their kids out by themselves. In the last twenty yrs there have been some nasty incidences with child abduction. It just depends on the parents. My kids started catching public transport without me to school when my eldest was about 10, and I let them stay home by themselves from about that age too. You do see kids walking to school though and riding their bikes places. Kids usually play at each others houses rather than gathering in the street. When they are older they get dropped off in town or at the cinemas or shopping malls.But there are some kids who don't know how to get around this city by public transport when they are 15! Depends on the parents.

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    Guest philnjulie

    hi, as you said one of the reaons we moved over here was for the kids we have 5 the elder 2 ride their bikes to school or walk, they cycle to the newsagent or subway for lunch and play in the local parks its all a bit different to being in the uk, and believe me its takes a bit of getting used to would hate to rein them in now.

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    Hi Mark, Yvonne & Family,

     

    We too came here for the want of a better life for our kids, in the UK I was terrified to let them out of my sight, I have a 10 and 6 year old, but feel I need to loosen the reigns in order for them to develop and learn. So I have started letting my son walk home from school most of the way, he gets his sister from her class and crosses a couple of roads with her (hand usually grabbing the back of her jacket most of the way!) I think he is experiencing the cautious side that parents have!

     

    There is a main road that I feel is just a bit out of their depth at the moment, so I meet them there and within a minute we are home. All in all the walk takes around 5-8 minutes, it's gut wrenching to be clock watching, but they have to learn somehow.

     

    I know what you mean with wanting them to experience what we did as kids, as much as I would love for that to happen, I think we are too protective for that, but every little step that they take and us will help them and us along the way. After all it's all a learning experience for us too!

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    Guest paul_smart
    Hi there all, As with a lot of you parents i imagine the prospect of a better childhood for our kids is a big motivating factor to migrating- So how does the cotton wool kid generation of the U.K compare with the typical childhood in Oz. Do you feel safe enough to let your kids go out to play, walk or cycle to school etc. Im really keen for my children to have a childhood like mine where we could go out and play and not be stuck in front of the tv or computer! Any thoughts would be gratefully appreciated, Thanks

     

     

    Hi,

    I'm child free at the moment, but looking to emmigrate to give any future kids a better start, I was in Adelaide 2003 the same time a friend of mine emmigrated to Adelaide, he was from Chelmsford in Essex, and had to be present all the time when going to the park etc etc, I went to visit him one day and asked where the kids were his reply was " well they're either at the shops, round a friends, at the pool or in the back garden"

    the kids were were 10 and 13 and he was quite happy to let them roam free such was the difference, the neighbours had all said if the kids ever get into trouble of any kind tell them to knock on the door and the neighbours would ring him, it was just something that the community did to look after each other, he had most of the locals numbers in a few weeks of moving in and has never had any problems, and the kids had a proper childhood -well the last part of it at least. one other comment is that when I was out there a 19 year old was still generally considered a child, they still were concentrating on having fun is the sense I mean it in, at 19 I was in full time employment and looking to move out, you are in no hurry to grow up in Oz, the pressures are different..

     

    Paul:)

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    Guest Roo1
    Hi,

    I'm child free at the moment, but looking to emmigrate to give any future kids a better start, I was in Adelaide 2003 the same time a friend of mine emmigrated to Adelaide, he was from Chelmsford in Essex, and had to be present all the time when going to the park etc etc, I went to visit him one day and asked where the kids were his reply was " well they're either at the shops, round a friends, at the pool or in the back garden"

    the kids were were 10 and 13 and he was quite happy to let them roam free such was the difference, the neighbours had all said if the kids ever get into trouble of any kind tell them to knock on the door and the neighbours would ring him, it was just something that the community did to look after each other, he had most of the locals numbers in a few weeks of moving in and has never had any problems, and the kids had a proper childhood -well the last part of it at least. one other comment is that when I was out there a 19 year old was still generally considered a child, they still were concentrating on having fun is the sense I mean it in, at 19 I was in full time employment and looking to move out, you are in no hurry to grow up in Oz, the pressures are different..

     

    Paul:)

     

    What a lovely post Paul!

    From what I've heard, older British Kids that have joined schools here in Aus, at a much later age, are having problems understanding what it is to be a kid. In a certain school here in HC there's been problems with bullies and guess what, the "gang" is made up of British kids!

    The Aussie kids are not used to this "toughness" and attitude that the Brit Kids are displaying. Is it a good thing to be wrapped up in cotton wool? Well, maybe if your child grows up and stays in Aus it might not matter so much. Just look at the Aussies around us, they seem alright to me, well adjusted to adult life etc and what a bonus to have a carefree childhood.

    Judi x

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    Guest Django
    problems with bullies and guess what, the "gang" is made up of British kids!

     

    The thing is people will generalise. It will be 'all of these pom kids are trouble'.

     

    Its what I have been saying for years here. Anti social stuff that goes on here in UK are because of three factors.

    1. Kids aren't allowed to be kids.

    2. Many adults are too busy with careers and their own social life to be real parents.

    3. Schools are not allowed to discipline.

     

    Looks like we are exporting these values. :sad:

     

    Pete

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    Maybe, but they will still be outnumbered by the kids who have grown up here, or moved at an early age.It is not only the british older kids, some of the Sudanese have problems, and before them it was the vietnamese.

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    Guest paul_smart

    How sad to think that British kids are now the troublemakers, I hope that Ozzie life chills them out and the parents can try to educate the kids on why they don't need to be uptight and stressed, lets hope that OZ changes the kids and not the other way round, like you said it would be a bad thing to export!!

    I want my kids to grow up when they are ready, hell I've tried to cling onto my youth, but who said enjoying life is childish? if i want to surf when i'm 55 that's what I'll do!!

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    Guest The Pottertons

    Thanks for all the replies guys, its really interesting to hear all your views. Im really glad that the aussie childhood lasts for so much longer as we do grow up far too quickly here. There was a report published a few years ago about british childhood and the fact that they are supervised at all times by a responsible adult. That kids that were never responsible for their own wellbeing or safety or able to forge relationships with their peers without adults present meant that they suffered in later life with social situations, common sense and being able to lead a responsible existence when the apron strings were finally cut. This has led to increases in psychological problems such as anxiety disorders and confidence and self esteem issues. This really scared me actually, more so than the much smaller potential threat of paedophiles or child abductors. Its so good to see that the majority of you all allow your kids that bit of freedom and i cant wait to join you all in the clock watching, waiting for them to walk in the door!!!:) yvonne

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    Guest Maddisons
    Hi there all, As with a lot of you parents i imagine the prospect of a better childhood for our kids is a big motivating factor to migrating- So how does the cotton wool kid generation of the U.K compare with the typical childhood in Oz. Do you feel safe enough to let your kids go out to play, walk or cycle to school etc. Im really keen for my children to have a childhood like mine where we could go out and play and not be stuck in front of the tv or computer! Any thoughts would be gratefully appreciated, Thanks

     

    From what we saw last year the kids were playing in the parks more.Not much on the streets but lets be honest the beach was 5 mins away!!!!

    Plenty of families were having pic nics on the main grass verges in Glenelg on the weekends.Which was great to see such sights,kids and their parents having a great day in the sun.

    And the parents and kids on their bikes on the beach roads,if not cycling,jogging!!!

    I think overall your kids will have a great outdoor lifestyle purely because of the weather.

    Hope this helps.:v_SPIN:The Maddisons

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    My eldest is 14 and is quite happy getting himself about by bus and train. As long as he has a multi trip ticket I know that he will be fine. He went up to the city skatepark with his friends on the weekend and seem to take it all in his stride. I do make him take his mobile with him and ring him (at least once) to make sure he is ok. He is definitely having a better childhood here, much more likely to find him outdoors than stuck in front of the tv/computer.

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