Ktee

Bushfires - PLEASE READ

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    As the temperature is warming up down there I would like to remind you all about the risk of bush fires. The first major one we went through was Black Saturday and it was devastating and I would never like to see anything like this again. Please do not think you don't live in the country so you are safe, we lost a round 12 houses close to us and that was a built up area.

    Have you got a bush fire plan ready? Have you got an emergency kit on stand by? Have you somewhere for your pets to go if needed? Have you got all your important documents put together in an air tight box. Do you know the best route out? Do you know where to head? Do you know where your closest evacuation centre is ?

    All this may seem over the top but if it helps just one person be prepared then I'm happy. Every year we are on cyclone watch so have an emergency kit and plan in place, its surprising how many don't.

     

    Take a read of this http://www.pomsinoz.com/forum/attachments/weather-chat-info-alerts/3701d1317515861-bushfire-ready-firereadykit_complete.pdf

     

    It is based on Victoria but a lot of it is general advice.

     

    Now stay safe and enjoy the heat:wubclub:

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    Guest Jubilant

    Thank you for this information. I am planning to move Adelaide in Feb. and don't know how often bushfire happens in this area. When was last bushfire in Adelaide?

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    Guest Guest75

    It can be really scary!! Our last place was rear the Onkaparinga Gorge - regular bushfires down there - including idiots torching stolen cars!!!

     

     

    The best site here in South Australia is the CFS site........http://www.cfs.sa.gov.au/site/home.jsp

     

     

    There is a "Current incidents" page as well.

     

     

    Really do have an action plan ready.............. Just ready up on "Ash Wednesday" here in Adelaide...........sobering stuff.

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    Guest Guest75
    Thank you for this information. I am planning to move Adelaide in Feb. and don't know how often bushfire happens in this area. When was last bushfire in Adelaide?

     

    We have no major bushfires here for a number of years now fortunately. We had huge ones on Kangaroo Island and over on Yorkes Peninsular a few years ago.

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    Bushfires/fires are common here, it's a part of life. In Adelaide less risk but in SA over the last 3 days the CFS have dealt with over 350 fires some of them within Adelaide. Now that's over a huge area and they range from very small to fires still currently burning out of control (take a read of adelaidenow.com.au) It's part of life in Australia like the sharks. That said there have been no major bushfires in Adelaide for a while.

    Edited by minty

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    If you live on the plains in Metro Adelaide, bushfires are no threat.

    If you live in the foot hills, from above Portrush Rd , top of Magill Rd and roads that lead around the Old Belair/ Belair Rd there is always a threat but more from a grass fire, which can take off if it gets into the few inaccessible gullies in this area. The main threat for bushfires here in Adelaide is anywhere in the hills where brush has built up and paddocks are dry and it's hot dry with strong winds. "Bushfire weather"

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    Thank you for this information. I am planning to move Adelaide in Feb. and don't know how often bushfire happens in this area. When was last bushfire in Adelaide?

    Don't let it stop you moving to Adelaide or any other state. Just make sure you are always prepared, its better being safe than sorry.

    Here is some history from CFS page

     

    Bushfire History

     

     

    Research undertaken by Luke and McArthur (1978) indicates that South Australia can expect serious fires somewhere in the State in six or seven years out of every ten.

     

     

    1917 to 1945

     

     

    Data on fire occurrence before World War 2 in South Australia is not comprehensive but summarised newspaper reports from that time indicate that for the period between 1917 and 1945 there were forty-four fires recorded. The most widespread fires occurred in 1933-34, 1938-39 and I943-44. In each of these seasons significant damage was experienced in south-east districts, in or near the Adelaide Hills, and on Eyre Peninsula.

     

     

    Forty-three of these fires occurred between December and March; four in December, eleven in January, twelve in February and sixteen in March.

     

     

    1950s

     

     

    During December 1951 fires caused by lightning burnt about 450,000 hectares in the eastern and north-eastern pastoral districts. A contributing factor to the extent of these fires was high fuel loads resulting from above average rainfall earlier in the year. Losses of stock, feed and fencing were heavy.

     

     

    The next widespread fire, known as ´Black Sunday´, occurred in the Adelaide Hills on January the 2nd 1955. Extreme fire weather conditions were recorded in Adelaide during the morning and afternoon, followed by a strong south-westerly change. Two fire fighters lost their lives and damage, spread over a total area of at least 40,000 hectares, was estimated at $4,000,000.

     

     

    The relatively mild 1957-58 fire season was followed by a dry autumn during which, in April 1958, eight fire fighters lost their lives in a pine plantation fire in the south-east.

     

     

    Towards the end of the 1950s rainfall was above average in many districts; conse-quently a number of large fires occurred from 1959 to 1961. In 1959 there were two major fires; one near Kongorong, in the South East, covered 28,000 hectares. It caused damage estimated at about $1,500,000, and cost the life of a grazier. The second fire burnt about 76,000 hectares of grassland and scrub near Wudinna, on the Eyre Peninsula.

     

     

    1960s

     

     

    During 1960, damage estimated at $388,000 occurred when a fire burnt an estimated 6,000 hectares in northern Yorke Peninsula. Two other major fires occurred that year; one near Wirrabara in the Flinders Ranges, with damage estimated at $20,000 in an area of 8,000 hectares; and the other near Tintinara where 100,000 hectares of pasture and scrub were burnt.

     

     

    In 1961, a fire in pastoral country burnt a large area near the Wilpena Pound in the northern Flinders Ranges.

     

     

    The next major fires occurred in 1968-69. A fire in the pastoral area in the Far North West of the State burnt an area of about 900,000 hectares. This was followed by a fire of about 8,000 hectares near Murdinga, on the Eyre Peninsula, where damage amounted to $140,000.

     

     

     

     

     

     

    1970s

     

     

    Luke and McArthur (1978) report that from July 1966 to June 1972 the average number of fires attended annually in South Australia was about nine hundred. The total area burnt each year averaged 190,000 hectares, ranging from 15,000 hectares to 900,000 hectares depending on the fire season. The estimates of financial loss ranged from $38,000 to $245,000 with an average of $210,000.

     

     

    Huge areas of arid and semi-arid pastoral country were burnt in 1974-75. The area burnt has been estimated at sixteen million hectares; three million hectares of pastoral country and thirteen million hectares of unoccupied land. A large proportion of the north-west of the State was burnt during the period from early November until early in February.

     

     

    Fire report summaries included in the SACFS annual reports from 1978 and 1979 refer to four major fires during the 1978-79 fire season; 1,000 hectares at Yadlanue Station and 1,200 hectares at Wilmington in December 1978, 1,100 hectares at Pinnaroo in January 1979 and 7,400 hectares at Caveton in February 1979. A 480 hectare fire was also reported at Meningie in December 1979.

     

     

     

     

     

     

    1980s

     

     

    Fire report summaries included in the SACFS annual reports from the 1980s refer to forty major fires during the decade. The most significant of which were the Ash Wednesday I and II fires which occurred in February 1980 and February 1983. The focus on the devastation of these fires however tends to draw attention away from the fact that during the 1980s there were over 830,000 hectares burnt. Ten fires, predominantly in the sparsely populated north east of the state, were in excess of 10,000 hectares each. One, attributed to forty three lightning strikes in the pastoral area in November 1989, was estimated to be in excess of 600,000 hectares.

     

     

    Fires that posed a threat to settled areas during the 1980s were; Ash Wednesday I (3,770 hectares - February 1980); Horsnell Gully (400 hectares - April 1980); Ash Wednesday II (February 1983); Black Hill (1,500 hectares - January 1985); Pt Lincoln (200 hectares - February 1985); Kapunda (1,200 hectares - March 1986); Strathalbyn (6,000 hectares - November 1987); Kapunda (2,569 hectares - December 1987); Morialta (300 hectares - January 1988); and Kersbrook (400 hectares - March 1988).

     

     

    1990s

     

     

    Fire report summaries included in the SACFS annual reports and from SACFS incident reports from the 1990s refer to seventy major fires during the decade. Seven fires, predominantly in the sparsely populated north east of the state, were in excess of 10,000 hectares each. The largest fires recorded were; Ernabella (900,000 hectares - January 1990); Flinders Chase (25,000 hectares - October 1991); Ngarkat (50,000 hectares - January 1999); and Ngarkat (110,000 hectares - January 1999).

     

     

    Three significant fires that posed a threat to settled areas during the 1990s were; Clare (400 hectares - April 1994); Rapid Bay (300 hectares - January 1995); Heathfield (450 hectares - January 1995).

     

     

     

     

     

     

    2000s

     

     

    Fire report summaries included in the SACFS annual reports and from SACFS incident reports from the first three years of the decade until the end of 2003 refer to fifty three major fires. Four fires, predominantly in the sparsely populated pastoral areas of the state, were in excess of 6,000 hectares each. The largest fires recorded were; Mt Rescue (18,000 hectares - November 2002); Gawler Ranges (15,000 hectares - December 2002); De Molle River (6,800 hectares - November 2002); and Ngarkat (6,000 hectares - December 2001).

     

     

    Three significant fires that posed a threat to assets in the Mt Lofty Ranges and the Fleurieu Peninsula during the first three years of the new century were; Brownhill Creek (1,000 hectares - June 2000; Rapid Bay (1,200 hectares - January 2001); Hillbank (350 hectares - December 2001); and Morphett Vale (300 hectares - December 2003).

     

     

    February 2001

     

     

    During the 2 weeks of the 1st to the 9th of February 2001 a fire in the vicinity of Tulka on the Lower Eyre Peninsula burnt through approximately 14,000 hectares of bushland and coastal vegetation. The township of Tulka consisting of 46 homes suffered significant losses with 11 houses destroyed and a further 10 suffering major damage. Many other assets were also damaged including; caravans, trailers, vehicles, boat, rainwater tanks and sheds.

     

     

    11th January 2005

     

     

    On this day SA experienced extreme fire weather with Fire Danger Indices in excess of 300 recorded on the Eyre Peninsula. Two fires of major significance occurred, one at Wangary on the Eyre Peninsula and the other at Mt Osmond in the Adelaide Hills. The Wangary fire burnt approximately 78,000 hectares with significant losses including 9 fatalities, 93 houses, 237 sheds, approximately 47,000 livestock, and 6,300 kilometres of fencing. The Mt Osmond fire burnt approximately 120 hectares with the loss of 3 buildings, 4 vehicles and 4 kilometres of fencing.

     

     

     

     

     

     

    10th January 2007

     

     

    On January 10th 2007 an area 30 km South East of Adelaide known as Mount Bold was impacted by a bushfire. The fire burnt through a mix of scrub, plantation, grass and forested areas. Up to 400 firefighters, more than 80 appliances, water bombers and observation aircraft attended to the fire.

     

     

    The Mt Bold fire burnt around 2,000 hectares and threatened approximately 60 homes in the Kangarilla and Echunga area. One dwelling was destroyed and numerous sheds, livestock and equipment sustained various degrees of fire damage.

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    As said above definitely don't get put of by it. You have to remember SA is huge so the chance of it effecting you is small.

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    As the temperature is warming up down there I would like to remind you all about the risk of bush fires. The first major one we went through was Black Saturday and it was devastating and I would never like to see anything like this again. Please do not think you don't live in the country so you are safe, we lost a round 12 houses close to us and that was a built up area.

    Have you got a bush fire plan ready? Have you got an emergency kit on stand by? Have you somewhere for your pets to go if needed? Have you got all your important documents put together in an air tight box. Do you know the best route out? Do you know where to head? Do you know where your closest evacuation centre is ?

    All this may seem over the top but if it helps just one person be prepared then I'm happy. Every year we are on cyclone watch so have an emergency kit and plan in place, its surprising how many don't.

     

    Take a read of this http://www.pomsinoz.com/forum/attachments/weather-chat-info-alerts/3701d1317515861-bushfire-ready-firereadykit_complete.pdf

     

    It is based on Victoria but a lot of it is general advice.

     

    Now stay safe and enjoy the heat:wubclub:

     

    Thank you for this Ktee.

    My OH was a firefighter for 25 years.

    We have just had a very wet winter and the fire load (the kilojoule content) of the surrounding vegetation is very high right now. Our Adelaide Hills and other areas mentioned are a real worry if we get conditions that our fire teams cannot hope to control. These conditions comprise high winds and high temperatures. Fire spreads much faster on sloped ground so please don't leave it too late to get out. During large bushfires the fire creates it's own wind and fire spread through airborne embers can be a considerable distance from the original outbreak.

    Fire is a natural occurrence and shouldn't be a factor when deciding where to live. My OH once took me to a posh tree lined residential area where 13 multimillion dollar mansions were lost. Looking around it was impossible to see just how it happened...kilometres away from the bush...but the conditions on that day were the factor.

    As Ktee says...get out and stay out. possessions can be replaced...lives can't.

     

    Tamara

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    That said there have been no major bushfires in Adelaide for a while.

     

    I had a friend who lived at Eagle on the Hill and there was a bushfire there not that many years ago. The fire jumped the Freeway as well.

     

    There was also a fire not that long ago that went up the hill at Belair, only about 15 minutes out of the city.

     

    Today there have already been two houses lost at Eden Valley in the Barossa, which is not that far away.

     

    There are some lovely places around Adelaide, but whenever we drive through the hills, we always look at those houses that are at the top of a hill, with trees and bush below them, and really, the nice views just don't justify the risks for me.

     

    We were at a golf club near Glenunga a few weeks ago and they were doing a controlled burn along one of the roads there - we smelt the smoke and were concerned, but the scariest thing was the noise of it - that really loud crackling that the oil in gum trees makes when it burns, really quite terrifying.

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