clan mac

It cant be all that grim surely???????? .

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    We are clan Mac,

    hubby is a construction manager and I am a mental health support worker who also teaches Zumba. We have just sold our house which has taken 2 years, we have had our visa for 3 years so been dipping in and out of this and PIO for a while. Last night I was reading lots of really GRIM horror stories about lack of jobs and tradies not able to work due to licence restrictions and complex bureaucracy to get information on where to start. I realise I'm rambling here but I'M FREAKING OUT!!!!!!!!!

     

    We have been advised that hubby will likely need to go back on the tools which he is happy to do, he is a joiner to trade a) what license/paperwork will be need to work in Aus please?

    b) Is there work over there?

    I will scrub toilets/ sweep streets in fact anything as long as I can work. We really wanna make the move and we are prepared to work our buns off, but I have to say the posts on here don't instil confidence. I really feel for the families who are struggling and I hope they can work something out.

     

    Honest opinions please please please, I would hate for our experience to be an expensive exercise moving our children, dog and worldly goods round the world and back again.

     

    Sincere thanks

     

    Lola x

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    Guest Guest12727

    Hi Lola,

     

    On construction industry, some big projects have ended or are coming to an end (new RAH), however there are plans for further development on that precinct - new Women's and Childrens hospital, a second research institute and two university buildings. Then there is what will happen to the old RAH site. Further afield, there is talk of new mining potential - but who knows how far off that is. There is plenty of new housing being constructed. Others in the industry may have better idea on how much work there may be.

     

    On mental health, my understanding is that there is a shortage of trained and experienced people in this field. This is a growing issue here, but suffers from funding pressures, as does all health services. Nothing new there, same in NHS. I suggest you make contact with potential employers and start letting them know your skills. You can then judge for yourself. One issue you may find is that a lot of this work is in aboriginal health, and employers are looking for people with experience with this community. So if there is anything you can do when you arrive to gain knowledge/experience of this field, it will open up more opportunities for you.

     

    We are due national and then state budgets here in the following weeks. A time when no-one in health knows what is to come, so perhaps wait a month before contacting people.

     

    Good luck with making your decision.

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    Guest Guest12727

    Hi Lola, I was a construction Site Manager back in England, but out here you can have various titles like Site Foreman, Project Foreman, General Foreman, and Site Manager. Just some thing to look out for when searching for jobs. I think housing would be the best option for joinery work.

    Also you could try making contact with Bal on this forum, they have recently arrived and her hubby is a site manager and hopefully will find work soon and maybe be able to give you some more up to date info.

     

    Good luck

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    Guest mactac

    I'm actually going to be positive. :wideeyed:

     

    You both sound like you have jobs which are always in demand.

    You will need to get an Australian qualification for support worker I imagine, would do that straight away.

    May cost you time when you arrive but maybe pick up part time work while you are doing it.

     

    I am always seeing jobs in support work advertised but again do some short course here (cert 3/4) to get australian recognised paperwork.

    I think this is key. Aged care is also in demand and again you need to do a course (cert 3) maybe a couple of months. You are almost

    100% certain to get a job if you do this course in Adelaide and sounds like you would be able for it.

     

    Being cautious is good having the right attitude is also vital.

    There are jobs here but you will need to be smart, network and work hard it is not Sydney or Melbourne.

    Set yourself a deadline and after that time move state if you have trouble. But it sounds like you should manage. Again expect the worst it is not easy

    but you sound like you have the right attitude which is a big help.

     

    SS will keep you here for 2 years but at the moment it is only a moral obligation, keep your obligation, but if you struggle and need to feed your family have an exit plan.

     

    You will be fine. Best of Luck!

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    I will scrub toilets/ sweep streets in fact anything as long as I can work.

     

    That's a very can-do attitude and will definitely help you. On the other hand, I do wince a bit when I hear this from migrants. Personally, there's no way I'd willingly leave professional/skilled jobs behind and up sticks to the other end of the world in order to do 'anything'. I arrived on a skilled visa because there was (supposedly) a shortage here in the skills I have. I've said before that the Australian government must rub its hands in glee at the thought of skilled people being willing to pay handsomely for visas and to travel here, pumping their savings into the economy and willing to do jobs that some unskilled people already here don't want.

     

    Doing such work temporarily whilst waiting for more suitable work is better than nothing, agreed, but sometimes it becomes the long-term job. Certainly, the longer it takes to land a job in a person's chosen profession, the more they look like a 'former' professional rather than a practising one, and the harder it can be to get an opening. Regardless of an accountant's background, if they've been scrubbing toilets for the last three years, the chance of picking up an accountancy role is slim, regardless of their previous experience. When that happens, many people who once thought they'd do 'anything' face a different reality (and many jobs that fit in that broad title of 'anything' don't pay particularly well).

     

    Having said all that, lots of people make the move with the 'I'll do anything' mentality who never have to put that into practice because they pick up jobs suited to their skills. Hopefully you guys will do the same!

     

    Good luck!

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    Hi Lola

     

    just a bit of info on our situation.... We arrived 4 months ago due to the fact my husband secured a pm job on new RAH.... I gave up a job i loved as a youth worker in the UK, but arrived with determination to succeed in finding a job! It took me 3 months... 50 applications and 4 interviews to secure a job i love delivering thereputic youth work! And i didnt know anyone in the field! 2 weeks in im loving it! What i did notice when searching the job sites was the amount of jobs for mental health workers! So i think if you work hard, shine at interviews you should be fine! As mentioned before its worth keeping an eye on the job sites such as seek. Good luck with everything

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    It's even harder to do 'anything' when other migrants with the same skill set are able to pick up a skilled job.

    Like mentioned before it's a quite good short term solution but in the long run off putting.

    Upskilling in case no job is available is also a good advise, Aussie employers are very keen on Australian qualifications.

    Last but not least bring your resume into Australian format.

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    I will scrub toilets/ sweep streets in fact anything as long as I can work.

     

    Honest opinions please please please,

     

    Hi Lola,

     

    I'm not sure whether this is the kind of post you want, but IMHO life is not grim here.

     

    It's wonderful.

     

    We love our life here although it has to be said it is just life. I love our friends, the beauty around us, the footy....everything except the pollies lol!

     

    If you can't get work, life anywhere sucks. Unless you are one of the fortunate few that manage to get a job before you come over, you won't know how it will pan out for you until you get here. Take precautions; make sure you are financially prepared in case it takes a while to find work; be realistic in your expectations and if you do have great jobs in the UK, perhaps consider whether it is worth moving your family over. (Please don't shout at me for that last bit lol!)

     

    As for doing anything workwise, I think most people will if it brings in money! Don't think that because the jobs seem menial, that there won't be a line of applicants. It is not uncommon to find cleaners with degrees nowadays.

     

    So, to sum up! A) life here is awesome if you have money or/and a job, maybe not so much if you don't. B) No one can do anything other than guess if you will find employment here.

     

    I think most people worry before they come over, particularly if they have kids, animals and not huge amounts of money.

    :wubclub:

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    Thank you for all the helpful replies, I had forgotten how informative this forum was. TBH I would be on the plane as soon as the money from the sale of our house is in the bank, but we have a wee border collie puppy (Theo 7 months old) and we need to do the majority of his quarantine here so it looks as though we wont be heading out until Jan 5th 2015, which feels like eternity away. I was genuinely pleased when I read all the replies. We are very keen to come to Oz and I know the time will probably pass quickly. I look forward to keeping in touch with you all and maybe even meeting you some day.

     

    Sincere thanks for the heads up regarding my work. I have my SVQ 111 Health & Social care Adults, and my experience is assertive community outreach working with people with a long history of acute mental health and addiction. I imagine that the addictions experience might come in useful BUT I will look into what I need to do to achieve the required qualification for Aus. I love my job and couldn't imagine not working in community mental health but hey maybe teaching Zumba part time while I get my qualification is an option? (I LOVE TEACHING ZUMBA TOO!)

     

    Again, sincere thanks, all advice much appreciated.

     

    Lola and the clan x

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    That's a very can-do attitude and will definitely help you. On the other hand, I do wince a bit when I hear this from migrants. Personally, there's no way I'd willingly leave professional/skilled jobs behind and up sticks to the other end of the world in order to do 'anything'. I arrived on a skilled visa because there was (supposedly) a shortage here in the skills I have. I've said before that the Australian government must rub its hands in glee at the thought of skilled people being willing to pay handsomely for visas and to travel here, pumping their savings into the economy and willing to do jobs that some unskilled people already here don't want.

     

    Doing such work temporarily whilst waiting for more suitable work is better than nothing, agreed, but sometimes it becomes the long-term job. Certainly, the longer it takes to land a job in a person's chosen profession, the more they look like a 'former' professional rather than a practising one, and the harder it can be to get an opening. Regardless of an accountant's background, if they've been scrubbing toilets for the last three years, the chance of picking up an accountancy role is slim, regardless of their previous experience. When that happens, many people who once thought they'd do 'anything' face a different reality (and many jobs that fit in that broad title of 'anything' don't pay particularly well).

     

    Having said all that, lots of people make the move with the 'I'll do anything' mentality who never have to put that into practice because they pick up jobs suited to their skills. Hopefully you guys will do the same!

     

    Good luck!

     

    Though it can be its only one person with the actual skill for the visa requirement. It can happen that the other is the partner who may or may not have skills or qualifications to help land them a skilled job. Or who may not work in a skilled/professional field in the UK so isn't expecting or wanting to go into one here. Or may be a parent staying at home with the kids who only wants or can do a part time job doing whatever to help bring in a bit of extra money (that is the catagory I currently fall in to, I work employed and self employed to fit in around schooling etc so we don't dish out in childcare).

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    We are clan Mac,

    hubby is a construction manager and I am a mental health support worker who also teaches Zumba. We have just sold our house which has taken 2 years, we have had our visa for 3 years so been dipping in and out of this and PIO for a while. Last night I was reading lots of really GRIM horror stories about lack of jobs and tradies not able to work due to licence restrictions and complex bureaucracy to get information on where to start. I realise I'm rambling here but I'M FREAKING OUT!!!!!!!!!

     

    We have been advised that hubby will likely need to go back on the tools which he is happy to do, he is a joiner to trade a) what license/paperwork will be need to work in Aus please?

    b) Is there work over there?

    I will scrub toilets/ sweep streets in fact anything as long as I can work. We really wanna make the move and we are prepared to work our buns off, but I have to say the posts on here don't instil confidence. I really feel for the families who are struggling and I hope they can work something out.

     

    Honest opinions please please please, I would hate for our experience to be an expensive exercise moving our children, dog and worldly goods round the world and back again.

     

    Sincere thanks

     

    Lola x

     

    Answer to your questions Depend if your husband has any qualifications for construction manager. I was a building foreman for a number of years in the UK but went for nothing here as I did not have any qualifications to back it up just my trade.

    If he is going to just get a job as a joiner (carpenter here) and work for someone all he will have to get is a white card which is just basically a health and safety course and is easy to get its a 6hr course and are run all the time cost about $100 or there are cheaper options to get it.Do not do it on the net a lot of times its not accepted and a waste of money.

    There is work about but would not say they are crying out for tradies If you are coming over in January its a quiet time as everyone is on holiday things don't start till mid end of January.

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    Though it can be its only one person with the actual skill for the visa requirement. It can happen that the other is the partner who may or may not have skills or qualifications to help land them a skilled job. Or who may not work in a skilled/professional field in the UK so isn't expecting or wanting to go into one here. Or may be a parent staying at home with the kids who only wants or can do a part time job doing whatever to help bring in a bit of extra money (that is the catagory I currently fall in to, I work employed and self employed to fit in around schooling etc so we don't dish out in childcare).

     

    Well of course, some people want a change of career or a reduction in hours, responsibilities etc, or aren't the one in the family with the skills in demand - there are any number of scenarios. The point I was making is in the context of this thread which is about whether it's really grim here at the moment and doing 'anything' if the preferable work isn't available.

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    Guest Guest75

    Are we talking about the weather???

     

    Bloody freezing here at 8.5c and chucking it down!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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    Guest Kennymclachlan

    There are a few things you need to do to make sure all is covered. If not already, do your utmost to research whether your quals are readily transferrable or if you will have to get them assessed by an Assessing Body - this may not be obvious as it will not necessarily be a part of the visa application process. You may want to contact a qualified Careers Advisor in this area (that may cost though).

     

    Network, network network - I can't say this enough on these forums. Adelaide business communities are close-knit and 80%-90% of jobs are traded behind the scenes. Use LinkedIn, FB, Twitter, etc to make some connections and set up some coffee meetings on arrival.

     

    I suspect you are not going to have an issue with Mental Health Work. If the rest of the SA mental health professions reflect the Psychiatrists, then there is a severe shortage of qualified people. But don't be complacent about finding the work though.

     

    For your husband, it's true that many of the big construction projects are either coming to a close or well under way, but I suspect more will follow - particularly infrastructure, which still needs some attention inthese parts.

     

    Ensure your CVs are written with the Aussie job market in mind.

     

    In my honest opinion, it's never grim in South Australia if you previously lived in the UK! I'm sure some will disgree though and that's fine. Best of luck - I don't believe for a moment you will regret the move. Expect the ride to be rough at times and your expectations will likely be well managed.

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