Kerriandcarl

Is the move worth it??

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    Hi all

    after reading various posts on this forum, I have read a lot of negative posts and it hasn't given me a very positive feeling about coming over. We are in the process of our visa going through so would be hoping to be in adelaide in 8 months. We are risking a lot- selling our home, leaving our jobs, taking our 6 year old out of school and spending a lot of money! I have lots of doubts but still very excited that we are doing the right thing (lots of emotions) but when I read some posts on here it makes me think is it all worth it? Has anyone got any good story's to tell me to make me feel better about the process as this is such an exciting experience and we can't wait to get out there xx thanks

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    Have you visited before? There are a lot of great points about Adelaide, but there is no way around it, moving half way across the world you are always going to wonder if it's worth it.

     

    Personally I was living in Manchester before coming here. That actually wasn't anywhere near as bad as I had imagined it was going to be. I think I'd have been equally happy if we had moved to oz or to Cambridge where I'm from though.

    Each place has their positives and their negatives. I don't think either is really worse, just different. Some things are better here some are worse.

     

    I think more people struggle here if they are very close to family and friends in the uk.

    Also, it can be very overwhelming when you first get here, but that passes. :-)

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    I am not sure if you wanted replies solely from kids, as I believe this part of the forum is aimed at kids, but as your post sounds more appropriate to adults I am going to reply! You can simply ignore it if you like :yes:.

     

    We have been here a while now, and are very proud to be Australian. Our kids have gone through primary school, high school and now, for one anyway, uni. Neither of them have ever wanted to go back to the UK, even though we came from a lovely place complete with people we love very much (and a couple I am glad to see the back of lol!). I think the younger your family is, the more chance of finding what will become lifelong friends, and making your own history here. So a six-year old is just perfect lol!

     

    Life here is definitely just life, with the same problems here as anywhere else. I think that's possibly why some opinions can come across as negative; we are now in a position to compare. There seem to be two real sticking points against a successful migration, neither of which can truly be researched before coming over permanently. They are the pull of family and friends, and finding work.

     

    I think there are the obviously wonderful things about being here such as the sense of community, wonderful scenery, climate, emphasis on sports (great way for kids to make friends whilst their parents to make friends too), many brilliant schools, more spacious accomodation, and it's FUN!

     

    However, the downside if you come over, miss all you previously held dear, and cannot find work (and whether one person argues they found work easily, then another replies they have not, the truth is unemployment is currently a real problem) is that the move might not work. And that must be horrible. :sad:

     

    Unfortunately, you can compare posts, weigh up the positives against the negatives all you like, but it doesn't really mean anything. Only you know whether you, as a family, are prepared to risk any stability you might have for a dream that could turn out to be the most wonderful adventure. An adventure which, over the years, will calm down into pretty much the same life as you had before, but perhaps better beaches and new friends!

     

    So, in case you can't tell, we love our lives here. Would probably still have loved them in the UK too, but who knows?

     

    HTH,

     

     

    :wubclub:LC

    Edited by Lazy Cow

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    possibly why some opinions can come across as negative; we are now in a position to compare.

     

    Had I used my 'edit' to read over, rather than add smilies lol, I would've changed this!

     

    As someone wisely pointed out, I haven't experienced life in the UK for so long that I really can't compare the two countries. So when I say 'compare' here, I just mean SA over comparatively recent years.

     

    :policeman::smile: LC

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    See, even these posts go to show what different experiences people have, as lazy cow lists sense of community as one of the things she loves here. That is one of the things I miss from the uk.

    I would happily more quite a bit out of Adelaide to get that, jobs permitting.

    I've never been a city girl though and would much rather be in the country anywhere. :-)

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    I've spent half my life in the UK and half here in S.A. so I can compare them equally.....NOT.

    UK, when I was young, was a great place to live, even with all the employment problems that it went through in those years. I had it easy at the time but decided to emigrate for personal reasons.

    Australia was to be my new home, so I put aside the "I want it all just as it was in the UK" feelings and got stuck into making my new home, home. Yes, employment might be difficult for some, depends on your field of expertise. Be prepared to do something different for a while. In view of that, don't spend all your money on 'the best of everything'. Put up with basic and serviceable stuff initially. It worked for me.

    You'll miss your family and friends. Well friendship is already dealt with, we're here waiting for you to arrive. As for family, prepare them to come and visit in the first year or so. By that time, you will have discovered so many places to share, it will be obvious that this IS HOME for you. Remember, family is only a Skype away.

    Today, our 2 countries are vastly different and, having been back to the UK for a few visits, I can honestly say the Australia is the better bet, particularly for your children. Sure, things have changed here over the last 30 or so years but but not so much as in the UK. My only gripe at present is the traffic, but then, I don't drive as mach as I used to and perhaps I'm less tolerant of idiots than I used to be.

    Emigration is what you want it to be. A wonderful adventure, or a dismal mistake. Get your mind-set right, then make your choice. Those who go back early didn't prepare themselves and opt out at the first hurdle.

    Don't waste your time and money by not making the effort.

    I can assure of of only one thing. If you don't come now, you will regret it in the future.

    Good luck, Doug

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    I think most of the negative comments are about employment which obviously is such a deciding factor in what your life will be. Are you finding any other parts of it negative?

    What's you reason for wanting to do it in the first place?

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    Again no sure if you only wanted replies from people with kids or just about the whole experience.

     

    As everyone has said you will always get your positives and negatives about a move, we used to live on the doorstep of the new forest so a beautiful place I had a career which I had been doing for 10 years and never a day past when I didn't want to go to work! Rare I know.

     

    But something was missing couldn't put my finger on it, but just something, every time I visited Australia I just feel instantly relaxed.

    Moving is one of the most stressful things you will ever do regards of different town, county or country you have to start all over again meeting people, getting to know the area, which again can be fun but also a pain in the arse.

     

    You can't just go around the corner and see your family granted but skpye, viber and cheap international calls really help, my OH now actually gets the chance to have a good chat with his dad without his mum taking over the conversation so it can also improve already good relationships, I iMessage or Skype my mum daily same as I would in the uk (making sure time difference is ok!) so she still hears about all the stresses or good things that go in in the day and vice versa some people will think you have fallen off the face of the earth by moving countries but others don't and keep the relationships going.

     

    i dont do the same career I did in the uk, which is maybe a good thing as nothing can replace that job but I choose to follow a different career path when I came here one I had wanted to do since leaving school and yes it didn't fall into my lap straight away it has taken over a year of working other jobs and keeping trying but on Friday 13th I tidied up my work as offered to casual roles in the sector I want to work in so dropped 3 jobs and keeping 3, 2 in the field I want to work in and one to keep the dollars topped up so it's all heading in the right direction, that's the one disadvantage is a lot of work can be casual so sometimes you might need to juggle a little bit but saying that my OH has been in a perm f/t since we arrived. So maybe making a few calls before leaving to companies etc can help.

     

    You need to be open minded about the move things are going to be different but that is also part of the fun, family and friends can visit and you can go to the Uk visit, and if it doesn't work out once you have tried it for a few years there is no harm is saying things haven't worked and going back, if you don't try you will never know moving could be the best decision you ever make but of courses it's also the hardest.

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    Hi all

     

    thankyou for replying to my post. We like an adventure and a challenge and like doug said if we don't do it now we will regret it. We will move over positive and make it work out for us, if it dosent work out- then at least we give it a go! See you all next June hopefully xx

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    I think most of the negative comments are about employment which obviously is such a deciding factor in what your life will be. Are you finding any other parts of it negative?

    What's you reason for wanting to do it in the first place?

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    This may sound like an odd point, but the time of year you come can really affect your view of the place. Personally I'd wait until September if I were you. Winters here can be wet and cold, and leaving the beginning of summer for the beginning of winter can be a bit depressing.

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    These forums aren't the best place to get a real picture of happiness from people who have made the move. People that get here and enjoy it usually are too busy enjoying life to come on here and complain, where as the ones that come here and hunt out British groups and struggle to find bisto gravy in Woolies always come back to complain about how it's different.

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    Guest mactac
    These forums aren't the best place to get a real picture of happiness from people who have made the move. People that get here and enjoy it usually are too busy enjoying life to come on here and complain, where as the ones that come here and hunt out British groups and struggle to find bisto gravy in Woolies always come back to complain about how it's different.

     

    So I take it that must mean you aswell ? as I see you have made nearly 791 posts.

    People with positive and negative views make posts. It does not mean they have no life.

     

    Some people post here to vent frustration.

    Some to support each other.

    Both can be helpful.

     

    I think people packing up their lives deserve both negative and positive views.

    I think overall my experience has been negative but I know many have thought

    it was the best move of their life.

     

    I do not see their view as being less valid.

    I lived in another state and loved it. Currently looking to exit here as soon as I can (don't all cheer at once).

     

    Adelaide has great things to offer coming with a sense of caution is no harm.

    It may be what you need in life.

    Regardless, best of luck with your choice.

    Edited by mactac

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    So I take it that must mean you aswell ? as I see you have made nearly 791 posts.

    People with positive and negative views make posts. It does not mean they have no life.

     

    All I do is complain. Nearly 791 times by the looks of it.

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    June is not the best month of the year to arrive in Adelaide for the first time, because it's the start of Winter and can be very cold indeed - especially if you're living in temporary rental accommodation with no central heating at the start! Truly, winters in Adelaide can be very, very cold, and by mid-winter (July) I've often felt colder here than I ever was in England (because there we had central heating, and of course that makes all the difference!), so I'd urge anyone thinking of coming here in June, July or August to think again: September is a good month to arrive, as it'll be early Spring; so by Summer (December, January, February) you'll be much better acclimatised to cope when the scorching sun really starts to rock!!

     

    I wish everyone about to embark on a new life in Oz the very best of everything you wish for yourselves! x

    Edited by barbaitch

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    Guest Guest75

    I think that nearly all the lack of confidence or "negativity" is down to finances.

     

    In the early 2000's when the exchange actually made you money I saw people arriving with no worries.

    Building a house quickly or buying one, putting in that all essential pool and of course the obligatory brand new 4WD.

     

    Also walking into jobs and to honest if you did not like the job, ya just went and got another one.

     

    Now people are coming over on a shoe string.

     

    Looking for jobs in oversupplied areas of employment.

     

     

    That has changed and creates the "negativity".

     

    The rest of it here is just the same.

     

     

    We came "because we could" ( it covers the whole wanting new challenges / not wanting to be stuck in the mud and so on):cute:

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    Guest Guest12727
    June is not the best month of the year to arrive in Adelaide for the first time, because it's the start of Winter and can be very cold indeed - especially if you're living in temporary rental accommodation with no central heating at the start! Truly, winters in Adelaide can be very, very cold, and by mid-winter (July) I've often felt colder here than I ever was in England (because there we had central heating, and of course that makes all the difference!), so I'd urge anyone thinking of coming here in June, July or August to think again: September is a good month to arrive, as it'll be early Spring; so by Summer (December, January, February) you'll be much better acclimatised to cope when the scorching sun really starts to rock!!

     

    I wish everyone about to embark on a new life in Oz the very best of everything you wish for yourselves! x

     

    The winter day time temperature in Adelaide is always above 10C, usually above 12C. The sun shines nearly every day at some point. No end on end days of grey and I write this looking at the sun streaming in the windows at 10am, even though forecast for today is mainly rain. In UK, the winter day temperature never reaches 10, and to me a 10C day was a sign the very very long winter was finally coming to an end.

    In Adelaide the overnight temp is usually above 5C, with a few nights each year going down to 1 or 2C. In some regions outside Adelaide it goes into negative figures.

     

    It is true that houses are designed and heated differently. They can be cold inside so get used to wearing jumpers inside, something I never did in UK, as it was always stiflingly hot everywhere you went indoors. However, you can sit in a sunny corner of the garden and have your late morning coffee or afternoon tea and it feels wonderful.

     

    I think for most people just coming from UK, the first winter seems mild. It is only once you aclimatise to the summer heat that winter seems very cold.

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    As someone who works outdoors, believe me, there are plenty of days with no glimpse of sun. And lots where the sun is interspersed with big down pours. Thank god for wet weather clothing lol.

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    Guest Guest12727
    As someone who works outdoors, believe me, there are plenty of days with no glimpse of sun. And lots where the sun is interspersed with big down pours. Thank god for wet weather clothing lol.

     

    Yes days, but not weeks on end of nothing but grey. It is grey here now, but it was sunny this morning, and that was the point I was making. It is rare to not see the sun at all, even if it is between downpours.

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    Guest kobi
    I've spent half my life in the UK and half here in S.A. so I can compare them equally.....NOT.

    UK, when I was young, was a great place to live, even with all the employment problems that it went through in those years. I had it easy at the time but decided to emigrate for personal reasons.

    Australia was to be my new home, so I put aside the "I want it all just as it was in the UK" feelings and got stuck into making my new home, home. Yes, employment might be difficult for some, depends on your field of expertise. Be prepared to do something different for a while. In view of that, don't spend all your money on 'the best of everything'. Put up with basic and serviceable stuff initially. It worked for me.

    You'll miss your family and friends. Well friendship is already dealt with, we're here waiting for you to arrive. As for family, prepare them to come and visit in the first year or so. By that time, you will have discovered so many places to share, it will be obvious that this IS HOME for you. Remember, family is only a Skype away.

    Today, our 2 countries are vastly different and, having been back to the UK for a few visits, I can honestly say the Australia is the better bet, particularly for your children. Sure, things have changed here over the last 30 or so years but but not so much as in the UK. My only gripe at present is the traffic, but then, I don't drive as mach as I used to and perhaps I'm less tolerant of idiots than I used to be.

    Emigration is what you want it to be. A wonderful adventure, or a dismal mistake. Get your mind-set right, then make your choice. Those who go back early didn't prepare themselves and opt out at the first hurdle.

    Don't waste your time and money by not making the effort.

    I can assure of of only one thing. If you don't come now, you will regret it in the future.

    Good luck, Doug

     

    You sir, should post more often!

    After reading your post, I'm off to bed on a real genuine high. Shame the missus is asleep so misses out on my 'high'!

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    It's an impossible question to answer. We've been lucky, I managed to find work and we loved the summer and Autumn here (winter is rubbish everywhere!) However, if you don't find work things are expensive and you may struggle.

     

    Even with finding work, it's a costly business - our net finances are down into the many tens of thousands, although most of this is due to refurbing the house we've bought, but financially the move doesn't 'make sense' - it's a lifestyle decision. Personally, for the lifestyle it allows the kids, and the fun we've had (and friends we've made since arriving) I don't regret it. I'm not sure my wife would agree though, she's pretty much 50/50 about the whole thing still as she misses family and friends so much. We were in a position where we had great lives back home, both had good jobs and all our friends and family were nearby - this has made it harder I think than people who move because they are unhappy.

     

    The tips I'd give:

     

    1 - Research, research and more research - speak to agents, potential recruiters, send out cvs and try to get into discussion before you get out here. For every good agent there are 3 bad ones who may just ignore you, but I found an excellent one who was really helpful before we came out. They are there.

    2 - Consider your priorities - and really think about how much you'll miss people. It's harder than you think, and you can feel isolated at times.

    3 - Remember you can always go back. My family have set a (final) decision making time of 4ish years (as soon as we get citizenship), which should give us enough time to get over homesickness if we ever will.

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    Guest Guest75

    Moderators- wrong sub forum!! More grown up area??

     

     

     

    To the OP - it's a well worn clique - but life is what you make it.

    Having the right attitude ,taking the knocks and getting through that important first couple of years is the key.

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    You sir, should post more often!

    After reading your post, I'm off to bed on a real genuine high. Shame the missus is asleep so misses out on my 'high'!

     

    Why thank you Kobi, but the name is Doug and I'm more of a cur than a sir :smile: Not sure how to take your last comment as, in a younger life, if I went to bed on a high and the missus was asleep, I'd wake her and have my wicked way with her. Ah fond, but distant, memories. :jiggy:

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    Guest Spitfire
    Hi all

    after reading various posts on this forum, I have read a lot of negative posts and it hasn't given me a very positive feeling about coming over. We are in the process of our visa going through so would be hoping to be in adelaide in 8 months. We are risking a lot- selling our home, leaving our jobs, taking our 6 year old out of school and spending a lot of money! I have lots of doubts but still very excited that we are doing the right thing (lots of emotions) but when I read some posts on here it makes me think is it all worth it? Has anyone got any good story's to tell me to make me feel better about the process as this is such an exciting experience and we can't wait to get out there xx thanks

     

    We've lived in Adelaide for many years and in general it is a pleasant place. We are glad we started our family here instead of the UK. However, it has its problems, and I suspect you will make exactly the same discovery process of these as every other immigrant.

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    Guest Spitfire
    My family have set a (final) decision making time of 4ish years (as soon as we get citizenship), which should give us enough time to get over homesickness if we ever will.

     

    I thought getting citizenship would help me see everything more clearly, but it didn't change anything. All it does it enable you to return without the worry of any sanctions being imposed on you, and that in itself presents you with more choices and worries.

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