usherer

Can this Southeast Asian couple make it in Adelaide?

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    I’m from Singapore, about to undertake a Master’s in Flinders in 2015. I’m in a committed relationship with a man from Thailand, and we’ve been spending months researching ways on how we can be together in Australia.

     

    Since knowing my Australia plans, he’d spent about 6mths gathering finances and documents to apply for a Working Holiday Visa. [Now, the requirements for Thai nationals to get a WHV are quite baffling (considering how I’d applied for one in the UK myself before) – they actually have to ballot for a place, go through a face to face interview with the Thai ministry, before being eligible to apply to Australia government!]

     

    Anyway, long story short: he didn’t get the WHV when balloting opened in July. We were crushed. Months spent researching de facto visa, student visas, etc and finding that marriage is the easiest and/or least costly option (at least in the short term).

     

    I was/am reluctant to fast-forward our relationship and get married for visa reasons, though we are truly in love. But things being the way they are, I think I would have to do that.

     

    I have no doubt about our compatibility but I feel I need more information about potential financial repercussions for they may affect the new marriage.

     

     

    1. I will be struggling to make ends meet myself as an international student. How likely is it for me to find part-time jobs? I have 10 years of working experience in NGOs and corporations, mainly as an editor (book editor, and web editor). I have done translation into Chinese for 2 years. Note: I’m willing to take up hospitality and retail jobs, though ideally I want to do early childhood, which is my area of studies.
    2. How likely is it for him to find full-time contract work (he would be able to work unlimited hours)?
       
      He just graduated, and is skilled (albeit informally) in Thai cooking, agricultural cultivation, and Buddhism. He has a few months’ experience in hospitality work. While he can communicate effectively and joke in English, he can have minor struggles with it. He is a hands-on kind of guy, extremely hardworking. He is quiet but socialble and men and women, Thais and foreigners alike take to him easily, so he wouldn't have trouble fitting into new settings.

     

    I am concerned that out lack of local experience would be a sticking point with employers, as many forum posters suggest is the case even for casual jobs. Both of us do not have car driving licenses.

     

    Warm wishes~

    Edited by usherer
    Grammar

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    I’m from Singapore, about to undertake a Master’s in Flinders in 2015. I’m in a committed relationship with a man from Thailand, and we’ve been spending months researching ways on how we can be together in Australia.

     

    Since knowing my Australia plans, he’d spent about 6mths gathering finances and documents to apply for a Working Holiday Visa. [Now, the requirements for Thai nationals to get a WHV are quite baffling (considering how I’d applied for one in the UK myself before) – they actually have to ballot for a place, go through a face to face interview with the Thai ministry, before being eligible to apply to Australia government!]

     

    Anyway, long story short: he didn’t get the WHV when balloting opened in July. We were crushed. Months spent researching de facto visa, student visas, etc and finding that marriage is the easiest and/or least costly option (at least in the short term).

     

    I was/am reluctant to fast-forward our relationship and get married for visa reasons, though we are truly in love. But things being the way they are, I think I would have to do that.

     

    I have no doubt about our compatibility but I feel I need more information about potential financial repercussions for they may affect the new marriage.

     

     

    1. I will be struggling to make ends meet myself as an international student. How likely is it for me to find part-time jobs? I have 10 years of working experience in NGOs and corporations, mainly as an editor (book editor, and web editor). I have done translation into Chinese for 2 years. Note: I’m willing to take up hospitality and retail jobs, though ideally I want to do early childhood, which is my area of studies.
    2. How likely is it for him to find full-time contract work (he would be able to work unlimited hours)?
       
      He just graduated, and is skilled (albeit informally) in Thai cooking, agricultural cultivation, and Buddhism. He has a few months’ experience in hospitality work. While he can communicate effectively and joke in English, he can have minor struggles with it. He is a hands-on kind of guy, extremely hardworking. He is quiet but socialble and men and women, Thais and foreigners alike take to him easily, so he wouldn't have trouble fitting into new settings.

     

    I am concerned that out lack of local experience would be a sticking point with employers, as many forum posters suggest is the case even for casual jobs. Both of us do not have car driving licenses.

     

    Warm wishes~

     

    I can't help with the visa info but I have a few ideas on the job aspects. Given your language abilities I'd say you would be well placed for a job. Having said that Adelaide is notorious for requiring "local experience" so the best way to handle that is to make it work for you - hence emphasis on language skills. As for your partner, not sure, he might be able to get something back of house in a restaurant, but that's speculation on my part.

     

    A good way to start looking might be to check a few recruiters.

     

    http://www.membershipcentre.rcsa.com.au/RCSAWebGen/Company_Listing.aspx

     

    This is the site for the professional association for recruiters. You can use the various drop-down menus to locate some recruiters who may be able to help both of you.

     

    You could give them a call or email and see what they can organise.

     

    Best wishes for your future.

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    Thanks, Royd. Will definitely ring them up when I get there.

    As of today, I'm thinking it'll be better for me to get there alone first, check out the job market and costs before thinking further...

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    Unfortunately I can't give you information of who to contact but translating services are valued here in places like hospitals and other government services where documents are required to be translated or to act as a direct face to face translator. if you could do a search for who provides these services then you could also approach them. I think the pay is good too for these type of jobs because they are more of a casual nature but once you have proven yourself then you are likely to get more jobs.

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    @Toni, good idea! Something I should have thought of as I did that before in another country!

     

    AsI'll be doing early childhood teaching, should I actually get a leg into pre-schools/kindergartens?

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    Can I clarify, you are planning to come over on a student visa and your partner (who may become your husband) won't have a visa or be on your one?

     

    I am not sure you can apply for a partner visa for him when on a student visa. A student visa is usually a temp visa and you need PR to be able to sponsor afaik.

     

    Or are you planning to add him to your visa?

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    It looks like your options for him coming with you are as you say, marriage, or him coming on his own student visa. As you are aware that costs lots, and he's likely to be restricted on how many hours he can work.

     

    Part time work can be very hard to come by as a student. The non native English speakers really struggled on my course, but most of them were young with no work experience, so that probably didn't help.

    If your partner doesn't mind restaurant work he shouldn't have a problem getting a job.

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    @Toni, good idea! Something I should have thought of as I did that before in another country!

     

    AsI'll be doing early childhood teaching, should I actually get a leg into pre-schools/kindergartens?

     

    I am not aware whether pre-schools/kindegartens have funds put aside for translators (if that is what you are asking). Personally I wouldn't have thought so. I know of someone who does do translating and mainly they work for health services or family services. Do a search for Interpreting and Translating Services Adelaide and it comes up with a government organisation that looks like they may be looking for casual staff. Doesn't hurt to ask as a starting point anyway.

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    “I am not sure you can apply for a partner visa for him when on a student visa.”

    - It will be a dependant visa (http://www.immi.gov.au/students/students/bringing_family/how-to-apply.htm)... or would have been.

    “Part time work can be very hard to come by as a student.”

    - Something I’m worried about, but which some commentators have opposing views on. Will have to go over and assess for my own self. As for him, he has work experience and English good enough to communicate with me and in his work.

     

    “I am not aware whether pre-schools/kindegartens have funds put aside for translators (if that is what you are asking).”

    -Actually, I was asking about any position in pre-schools/kindergartens. I haven’t been able to find info about the kind of part-time jobs that would stand aspiring ECEs in good stead.

     

    “Do a search for Interpreting and Translating Services Adelaide and it comes up with a government organisation that looks like they may be looking for casual staff.”

    -Thanks!! the power of crowdsourcing personal knowledge beats days of research!

     

    Thanks, everybody. I’m still doing calculations – one final question: say I get to stay after graduation on the post-study work visa, and I somehow manage to get a job (apparently not easy in ADL), how much could I save per month? Let’s assume I get a casual contract in a pre-school.

    T

    hanks for the ideas and tips. Not feeling very optimistic now. It may be a huge thing for us, but we’re most probably one of the many, many who have to end up this way.

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