Lazy Cow

Koalas Need US...

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    I had the sad privilege of dragging a baby koala from our half -full wintering (yes, still!) spa. The little girl was only 3kg, and is now safe with Fauna Rescue (FR).

     

    The lady from FR was great, and I learned these things which can help heaps of koalas.

     

    So, here they are:

     

    1. Ice cream containers of water, left at the base of trees. NOT buckets as apparently the babies can fall off mum's back and drown :frown:

     

    2. Logs, or thick pieces of rope from your pool / spa to enable koalas to climb out if necessary.

     

    3. Water the ground near the base of any trees. This will cool the ground so the koalas can climb down for some relief from the heat.

     

    4. If you, or your kids, leave ice cream containers full of water, near trees in reserves, parks etc, then change the water on a daily basis, that would be fab. FR suggested using your route to school / wherever you regularly walk.

     

    5. Keep water, a bowl, and a rug in your car, in case you see an animal in need.

     

    6. There is a Koala Hotline which is available 24/7. It is: 7226 0017. We didn't know the number, and ended up taking our girl to the emergency vets on Anzac Highway - well, it was 1.30am!

     

    Apparently water, dogs, and cars are the main problems koalas face, so it's good to be aware. Our baby was placed with another five that had recently arrived. The vet said injured koalas were frequently brought in - I think it was two a week, but I hope I misheard.

     

    We probably all know the amazingly loud grunting noise koalas make, but I had no idea how piercing a noise a frightened baby koala could make! She sounded like a puma...very surprising. We were advised to take her in as koalas can appear to be fine, but then die from aspirating the pool water.

     

    Finally, if like me, you were brought up believing koalas get all the fluids they need from the eucalypts, well apparently not. Many SA koalas carry a genetically carried renal disease, and this can make them thirsty. Even healthy koalas will often need a drink.

     

    Finally, 'my' koala was a little sook (albeit a soaking sook), but I was told to bear in mind a scared koala has incredibly strong teeth..and nails I'm thinking...so take care.

     

    So please, take a few minutes to make sure your pool / spa is safe, and there is drinking water available.

     

    If you can pass this on, that would be great.

     

    Thank you,

     

    :notworthy: LC

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    Great thread.

    I remember when I worked as a wildlife ranger we had to hose down the koalas on a regular basis as they are prone to over heating.

    We currently have water out but we were late this year as by the time I'd got back from Sydney we had a bandicoot dead in the pool :(

    When we were in the outback a few years back we had some water in a pan and ended up with a swarm of bees coming over to drink from it.

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    Good things to know. Thanks LC. Glad the little one you rescued is doing ok now.

     

    I did know about the ice cream tub for water. I see some people slice a large plastic milk bottle down the side and put those out also. Others a flattish bowl. I keep checking to see if there are any koalas in the trees nearby and none have appeared lately (we usually see a couple a week in the trees round our house). It may be they are staying where there is already water or moving between trees they know will have water out at the bottom.

     

    The rope/log in the pool is also good for other creatures also so well worth having.

     

    Am going to sticky this thread for a while too :)

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    Hose down koalas? Bees drinking from a pan?

    Wow! Who'd have thought? Amazing. Thanks for that, Ktee :notworthy:

     

    Thank you for making it a temporary sticky, Snifter. :wubclub: Hopefully enough of us will make an effort to help these loveable little (quite big!) creatures. I've only ever seen ice cream tubs used, but it's good to hear about other things - especially if you don't eat ice cream!

     

    Any more hints / tips to help wildlife, particularly through the extreme weather, out there?

     

    I've noticed that birds seem to enjoy standing under the water sprinkler when it's hot. It probably never gets through the surface of the ground, but if the birds benefit, it's worth it.

     

    :smile: LC

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    Just giving this a bump as the warm weather starts to kick in.

     

    Even if you don't think you have much wildlife visiting your garden, chances are lurking somewhere are skinks and birds at least who would appreciate some water in the hot weather. A shallow dish on the ground filled daily is perfect for ground feeders and a tub or bird bath great for many birds although some birds like to drink at ground level (rosellas seem to prefer this I've found).

     

    Possums and koalas will also drink from low level drinkers or dishes on the ground. Don't use buckets as the young can drown in them sadly. Small ice cream tub or some such can be good. I use a big wide dish that used to have a big plant pot in.

     

    Also I take to carrying a water bottle when I go out on walks in the summer months. Not for me but in case I meet a koala or possum or something in need of a drink (has happened and the koala finished the bottle!).

     

    This link is to a great video that shows how the Aussie wildlife needs us sometimes. Worth a watch IMHO :)

     

    http://www.animalsaustralia.org/features/summer-wildlife.php

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    Just giving this a bump as the warm weather starts to kick in.

     

     

     

    That's fantastic, thanks @snifter!

     

    It seems so long ago now, but that little koala grew up and was eventually relocated to the Yankalilla area <3

     

    For anyone interested in learning how to care got our native wildlife, or even helping (and there are many ways you can), why not take a look at :

     

    http://www.faunarescue.org.au/home.htm

     

    :smile: LC

    Edited by Lazy Cow

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