awhall30

Getting a teaching job in Adelaide

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    Hi,

     

    My wife and i are looking to move to the Adelaide area in January 2016. We are both secondary teachers here in the UK (My wife - Science, me- Business, Economics and ICT). We are reluctant to move without jobs but seen to feel it is impossible to find a job before emigrating as certain documentation cannot be obtained without being in the region. Is it possible to obtain employment (i.e. in the independent sector) without the child protection training and first aid training needed? We anticipate moving at the end of December so would have a month to obtain the relevant documentation. Also, are there job opportunities in these areas? I get the impression that the economy is struggling at the minute and jobs are hard to come by.

     

    I have registered with some agencies and sent our CV's to some schools. However, I am wondering if paying for the visa has been a big mistake.

     

    Any help and guidance would be massively appreciated.

     

     

    Alex

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    That time of year the year contracts and permanent posts have already been filled and signed on the dotted line a few months before in readiness for the new school year at the end of Jan.

     

    You would be arriving in the summer holidays so would have plenty of time to get your registration and first aid etc sorted and in place. Then I'd think it is more likely to be relief work that may lead to something more, at least till the next round of posts come up later in the year.

     

    With regard to there being work, I know primary school teaching is hard to come by for many as so many teachers. Not sure about high school. Think maths and science are probably some of the more in demand subjects, but not sure.

     

    I've said this often on here and will mention it again. Your visa is for the whole of SA, there are often posts in rural areas well away from Adelaide that can be worth considering to give you a start. A few hours from Adelaide, population of a town a few thousand, that sort of thing. Often in teaching it seems they are crying out for teachers in rural/country areas but people flock to Adelaide still, so the market is saturated somewhat. This can also happen in trades or other lines of work.

     

    You you probably won't stand a chance of securing any kind of work unless you are here and ready to go, especially for relief teaching which is what a number of teachers I know have been doing the past couple of years. Permanent posts are like gold dust and highly sought after. Otherwise it's one year contracts that may or may not be renewed depending on schools budget and requirements and staff quota etc.

     

    I don't think you've made a mistake in getting a visa, more you need to research your planned timing of move and the areas you look at and not just confine yourself to the Adelaide area perhaps, at least to get you started. And be prepared to be here first to seek employment as that is the reality for most in many lines of work.

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    Thanks for your reply. Our Visa is a 189 visa so we can work anywhere in Australia. However, Adelaide had taken our fancy. We are visiting Adelaide in August (i know it is winter, but we wanted a look around, we are going to the north for the majority of our time in Australia). Is there anywhere anyone would recommend to visit (as a tourist and a potential resident to the region)?

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    Hi Alex, I'm speaking as the partner of a Primary School teacher, also through conversations with work colleges who have relatives in teaching and tales from a migration agent friend who's had dealings with teachers. Firstly when the OH has been job hunting online there have always been more job ads for secondary teachers. It would appear that the 2 most commonly used pathways into teaching are a) sign up for relief and hope someone spots your talent at the time a job vacancy becomes available or b) apply for a country job, which carries a lot of weight with the Aussies when you return to a city. We did meet a guy a few years back from this site who managed to land a secondary teaching job quickly after arrival, not sure of subject though.

     

    Not to continue being a 'negative nelly' but arriving in December would be less than ideal for a teacher, jobs already more than likely filled for the new school year, plus it tends to go quiet on the relief front as Teachers have had the Christmas break off, so don't tend to go sick for a while.

     

    Good luck.

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    Thanks for your reply. Our Visa is a 189 visa so we can work anywhere in Australia. However, Adelaide had taken our fancy. We are visiting Adelaide in August (i know it is winter, but we wanted a look around, we are going to the north for the majority of our time in Australia). Is there anywhere anyone would recommend to visit (as a tourist and a potential resident to the region)?

     

    Adelaide is lovely and has lots to offer. Of course it will depend what you want from it. Living in or around the CBD in Adelaide is of course going to be very different to living in one of the southern suburbs say or one of the small towns out in the hills. Personally, I love the vibe of the CBD and I could happily live in the CBD itself, hubby had a place there in our pre child days and I loved it then but its not practical now for us as a family. It doesn't suit everyone but usually many can find something that appeals and are happy living life in. Us included.

     

    Being winter lots of the things I'd suggest are probably not as ideal. Still I'd take in one of the wine regions, or a couple of them, lunch out, do the wine tasting (if staying at hotels in the city you can usually find a tour to book on if you are not hiring a car).

     

    I'd also suggest Cleland wildlife park for a day out and to see all the native animals etc. Its up in the hills and there is a bus stop there so buses do run out to there. Nice cafe for lunch too that isn't over priced. I'd also take in Mount Lofty while you are up that way, its not a day trip or an afternoon or morning unless you go for a walk around the trails there. If you don't want to walk the trails you can head down to the Mount Lofy Botanic Gardens for a wander instead knowing you will always be able to get your bearings and find the car park ;) Also up in the hills is Waterfall Gully which is worth a walk up. Its steep in places so be prepared. If you want to do the entire walk up to Mt Lofty winter is the perfect time of year to hit the trail up. Carry water anyways as its a few miles of uphill. Coming back, downhill all the way :)

     

    Dolphin sighting up at Port Adelaide. Check times and so on in winter season. Can make a day or an afternoon of it in Port Adelaide then if you wanted. Or a day trip down to Victor Harbor and Goolwa. Victor Harbor is lovely, head over to Granite Island but don't expect to see any penguins as there are hardly any left there (alas man and seals seem to have all but caused them to disappear in the wild there) although you can pay to see a couple of rescued ones at the centre. Its about a 40 minute walk around the island and wrap up as the Great Southern Ocean side can have a bitterly cold strong wind hitting it. Then you could head to the Goolwa barrage about 3 pm and wait for the pelicans to come in and feed. Its an amazing sight as there can be a hundred or more and you can walk out onto the barrage until a certain time when they lock the gates. If the gates are locked you can watch from the shore but if you have them, bring a pair of binoculars in case they remain out in deeper water.

     

    Then of course there is the Murray Mouth out over the bridge. Stunning area and when the tide is out its an amazing wander. I loved seeing for the first time where the Murray river ended and watching it flow into the sea.

     

    I also like the beaches in winter for a wander. You can head to Glenelg also and take in Jetty Rd, its cafes and so on and the beach there.

     

    In the CBD I'd always say the Central Market, the Botanic Gardens and the museums which are all close together. And free. You also have the state librabry which is worth a visit and the Mortlock Wing there is stunning to see (I've posted pics in another thread somewhere of it, think it was a kids thread). You can walk from the market through Rundle Mall and on to the museums and then the gardens. Or hop on the tram (free in the CBD area).

     

    Also perhaps hire a bike in the city and peddle out to Glenelg along the bike path. That way you'll cycle through some suburbs, see them in a bit more detail and also have a nice bit of exercise.

     

    Hope some of that is of interest and hopefully others will be along with some suggestions for you but if not, post and ask in a new thread in Aussie Chat as this thread is in the Job forum now and may not get read by everyone :)

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    Hi,

     

    Thanks for the replies above. Adelaide sounds interesting, i will take your recommendations on board. With regards to the teaching i get the impression it may be easier to work in another region. South Australia seems to be one of the only areas where you cant register as a teacher before you arrive in Australia, making it virtually impossible to secure employment before you leave. I'm a little risk averse and as both my wife and i are teachers it is a high risk strategy waiting to secure employment while your registration is complete. I quite fancied the area too!

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    TBH migrating is a risk and a big jump into the unknown for pretty much everyone doing so. Most migrate without securing work first as often people will be passed over if not resident in the country and able to attend interviews and so forth.

     

    Consider that if a prospective employer has 250 applicants for a job and you are the only one or one of a few not based in Australia already and s/he can find a dozen suitable candidates to short list from within Aus from the applicants then that is what s/he'll will most likely do, unless your application is a really stand out head and shoulders above everyone else but that is always going to be an unknown.

     

    Good luck with the job hunting elsewhere :) As has been said though, teaching posts for the new school year will have been filled by December and it will mostly supply teaching positions going at that point and further into the school year. Securing supply posts from overseas is going to be pretty non existant I'd have thought as often those are calling you up on the day or the night before etc.

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    South Australia seems to be one of the only areas where you cant register as a teacher before you arrive in Australia, making it virtually impossible to secure employment before you leave. I'm a little risk averse and as both my wife and i are teachers it is a high risk strategy waiting to secure employment while your registration is complete.

     

    I'm not a teacher, so I'm no expert, but we all get informed when the teaching vacancies are posted. So, long story short, I found this:

     

    http://www.decd.sa.gov.au/docs/documents/1/StaffingTimeline.pdf

     

    it might help / be of interest, IDK :smile:.

     

    If SA is the only place which won't allow you to complete teacher registration before you get here, why not apply to your next favourite state (or territory lol)? If you get a job there, then you could take it, even if it's simply a temporary measure.

     

    Good luck, and I hope you enjoy your visit.

     

    :wubclub: LC

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    Hi there! If you are going to be up North then visiting the Barossa valley is a must. Beautiful scenery and little townships such as Tanunda and Lyndoch. Driving through the Barossa is just stunning and there are many wineries and restaurants. There is also the farmers market on a Saturday morning where you can get some lovely produce. I live up North and I love it. The Barossa on my doorstep but only 45mins from the beach. Agree with Snifter on all other places to visit. Cleland is fabulous.

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