notpom

Half sober realestate article

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    Decided to share this, as it is the first article in the media for the last 15 years where majority of the information is actually correct.

     

    http://www.domain.com.au/news/five-real-estate-cliches-that-are-true-20160107-gl6lgz/

     

    The only funny thing is deliberations in the cliche #5. These deliberations completely ignore cliche #4. If it is land that is important, why would a person in their right mind talk about land outside capital cities? For God's sake - Australia is a country with the lowest population density. There is no such thing as "land shortage" in any inner areas.

     

    If you remember this, then property market becomes the simplest thing to predict. As I keep saying - Adelaide is one of three capitals where land is in ample supply. But not all land. The most obvious cluster of land shortage - land with ocean views. This is where you can not go wrong - this land will either appreciate (25% over the last 12 months) or go flat. Ordinary land in Adelaide at some stage will go down. Before it goes up again. (the days when you could buy 3 bedder in Hallett Cove for $80K well and truly gone).

     

    This is not a rocket science, and the article as a whole is very useful.

     

    At least it would allow you to laugh at this kind of journalism:

     

    http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/messenger/north-northeast/heres-the-suburb-in-adelaides-north-east-real-estate-agents-are-tipping-to-boom-in-2016/news-story/efe2add36f55e3338427b2715544456b#itm=newscomau%7Chome%7Cnca-homepage-network-most-popular-masthead%7C1%7Cnumber-16km-from-the-city-is-this-our-new-boom-town%7Chomepage%7Chomepage&itmt=1452132724243

     

    Hey, anybody home? What is "increased flexibility of alotment sizes" and how exactly it makes you life better at such revolting ghettos?

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    Notapom you are not being consistent.

    You say the article is correct

    The article predicts the top suburbs for growth none of which are coastal

    The top 10 most expensive suburbs in Adelaide do not Include a single coastal suburb

    Yet you keep going on about sea views?

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    There are some very expensive suburbs east of the city. Many have increased considerably in value during the past year or so...more so than other suburbs.

    There was a recent news article about homes cracking the $2 million barrier too.

     

    Allotment sizes! Medium density areas. I have two houses next door to each other, both zoned medium density...worth more to knock them down and build 10 homes on the double block...each new home would be in the $375,000 to $400,000 range but it comes at a cost for those living there and for surrounding neighbours. (never mind all the blood, sweat and tears that went into renovating them!).

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    Notapom you are not being consistent.

    You say the article is correct

    The article predicts the top suburbs for growth none of which are coastal

    The top 10 most expensive suburbs in Adelaide do not Include a single coastal suburb

    Yet you keep going on about sea views?

     

     

    They teach reading in the primary school.

    FIRST ARTICLE from Domain is largely correct.

    The article from Advertiser is a laugh stock. I fail to see how I could make it more clear.

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    Lol,

    There is nothing in the first article that suggests highest growth areas to be near the sea (unless you know of somewhere in SA that you can see the Sydney Harbour Bridge!)

    Maybe you should read it again

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    There are some very expensive suburbs east of the city. Many have increased considerably in value during the past year or so...more so than other suburbs.

    There was a recent news article about homes cracking the $2 million barrier too.

     

    Allotment sizes! Medium density areas. I have two houses next door to each other, both zoned medium density...worth more to knock them down and build 10 homes on the double block...each new home would be in the $375,000 to $400,000 range but it comes at a cost for those living there and for surrounding neighbours. (never mind all the blood, sweat and tears that went into renovating them!).

     

    East (esp North East) is well and truly revolting place. Tired, depressing, rundown. As to "desirability", for some people amphetamines is a desirable thing and they pay good money to destroy their lives. This si not a uncommon phenomenon. In abattoirs the billy goat declares it a "cool place", and herd of sheep follows. It is up to them.

     

    Lets talk about medium density. Yours in Onkapariga Council. Do not know what the sizes of lots are, but for "row houses" min land allocation is 150 sq m.

    This is unless you can submit plans that show that other aspects are compliant. In that case they would even give you some concession on alottment sizes.

     

    Can't say I understand your worries about your neighbours being upset. If you think about it harder, they will be upset anyway.

    Say there will be three scenarios:

    1. You do not develop but sell later on. Rest assured that in this situation you will sell to the friend or relative of your agent. And they will develop straight away. Usually you will be wrestled into 3 months settlement (so Council business will be finished at your expense) and they will start bulldozing before your neighbours can blink. And they will blame you for selling to a developer.

    2. You keep properties forever. Then your neighbours will be upset because everyone else is developing except you. "We would like to get this noise over ASAP"

    3. If you follow the first two scenarios - you lose awful lot of money. In a futile attempt to please your neighbours. And it is truly futile. You own two adjoining properties, so in their eyes you are "tall poppy" and you need to be cut down. People do not mind you going ahead, but not ahead of themselves. Don't you think it is an awful waste of life - when you trying to live up to the expectations of people who in reality do not like you? C'mon, there are 4 billion people on the face of the Earth, and nowadays it is easy to find someone who has the same areas of interest.

    Talk to Rivergum Homes - I have seen few row house developments.

     

    And do not dwell on the sweat of renovations - life is about moving ahead. And the main purpose of making money - spend life thinking about something better than "where to get money for this and that".

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    East (esp North East) is well and truly revolting place. Tired, depressing, rundown. As to "desirability", for some people amphetamines is a desirable thing and they pay good money to destroy their lives. This si not a uncommon phenomenon. In abattoirs the billy goat declares it a "cool place", and herd of sheep follows. It is up to them.

     

     

    :biglaugh: :biglaugh: :biglaugh: Lots of lovely places in the east and north east with lots of new buildings. Unfortunately there are also lots of subdivisions where two, three, four or even five houses are now standing where there was once one, but overall the east and north east are lovely areas. You can even see the sea from the foot hill eastern suburbs :wink:. Sometimes notpom I wonder if you have ever even been to Adelaide or if you just invest from afar based on google maps and then talk the areas up in the hope of increasing the value of your properties.

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    Lol,

    There is nothing in the first article that suggests highest growth areas to be near the sea (unless you know of somewhere in SA that you can see the Sydney Harbour Bridge!)

    Maybe you should read it again

     

    OMG!!!!

     

    My friend, I am worried about you.

     

    3) Million-dollar views

    Clearly, some buyers are willing to part with a lot of money for the best outlook.

    You’ve heard it a thousand times, but that doesn’t mean it’s not true. Some of the views in Australia really do command outrageous price tags – though they’re hard to quantify.

    If your property has a view of the Harbour Bridge or another iconic feature, chances are it will boost your ability to sell.

    Point-blank views of the harbour bridge and Walsh Bay were the main attraction for a 30 square metre studio sold in 2015 for $700,000 – one of the priciest local homes when looking at price per square metre.

    Meanwhile, some of the best views in Sydney are found at Kirribilli Avenue, Kirribilli – where McGrath agent David Howe said they have some buyers who purchase multi-million dollar homes solely for the views, “so they can visit once a year to watch the fireworks”.​

    Edited by snifter
    removed comment

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    :biglaugh: :biglaugh: :biglaugh: Lots of lovely places in the east and north east with lots of new buildings. Unfortunately there are also lots of subdivisions where two, three, four or even five houses are now standing where there was once one, but overall the east and north east are lovely areas. You can even see the sea from the foot hill eastern suburbs :wink:. Sometimes notpom I wonder if you have ever even been to Adelaide or if you just invest from afar based on google maps and then talk the areas up in the hope of increasing the value of your properties.

     

    Whatever, I agree with you. It is futile to conduct the argument about "likes and dislikes" between two specimen of Homo sapiens.

    Edited by snifter
    removed comment

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    OMG!!!!

     

    My friend, I am worried about you.

    3) Million-dollar views

    Clearly, some buyers are willing to part with a lot of money for the best outlook.

    You’ve heard it a thousand times, but that doesn’t mean it’s not true. Some of the views in Australia really do command outrageous price tags – though they’re hard to quantify.

    If your property has a view of the Harbour Bridge or another iconic feature, chances are it will boost your ability to sell.

    Point-blank views of the harbour bridge and Walsh Bay were the main attraction for a 30 square metre studio sold in 2015 for $700,000 – one of the priciest local homes when looking at price per square metre.

    Meanwhile, some of the best views in Sydney are found at Kirribilli Avenue, Kirribilli – where McGrath agent David Howe said they have some buyers who purchase multi-million dollar homes solely for the views, “so they can visit once a year to watch the fireworks”.​

     

     

     

    Gee thanks for clearing that up Notapom, for a minute there I thought I'd completely missed the bit that said 'coastal suburbs in SA have the best growth potential' and mistakenly thought it was talking about spectacular views of the Sydney harbour bridge and how much you would have to pay for a property with such a view.

    You're such a clever chap, thanks for sharing

    Edited by snifter
    removed now deleted part of quote

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    East (esp North East) is well and truly revolting place. Tired, depressing, rundown. As to "desirability", for some people amphetamines is a desirable thing and they pay good money to destroy their lives. This si not a uncommon phenomenon. In abattoirs the billy goat declares it a "cool place", and herd of sheep follows. It is up to them.

     

    Lets talk about medium density. Yours in Onkapariga Council. Do not know what the sizes of lots are, but for "row houses" min land allocation is 150 sq m.

    This is unless you can submit plans that show that other aspects are compliant. In that case they would even give you some concession on alottment sizes.

     

    Can't say I understand your worries about your neighbours being upset. If you think about it harder, they will be upset anyway.

    Say there will be three scenarios:

    1. You do not develop but sell later on. Rest assured that in this situation you will sell to the friend or relative of your agent. And they will develop straight away. Usually you will be wrestled into 3 months settlement (so Council business will be finished at your expense) and they will start bulldozing before your neighbours can blink. And they will blame you for selling to a developer.

    2. You keep properties forever. Then your neighbours will be upset because everyone else is developing except you. "We would like to get this noise over ASAP"

    3. If you follow the first two scenarios - you lose awful lot of money. In a futile attempt to please your neighbours. And it is truly futile. You own two adjoining properties, so in their eyes you are "tall poppy" and you need to be cut down. People do not mind you going ahead, but not ahead of themselves. Don't you think it is an awful waste of life - when you trying to live up to the expectations of people who in reality do not like you? C'mon, there are 4 billion people on the face of the Earth, and nowadays it is easy to find someone who has the same areas of interest.

    Talk to Rivergum Homes - I have seen few row house developments.

     

    And do not dwell on the sweat of renovations - life is about moving ahead. And the main purpose of making money - spend life thinking about something better than "where to get money for this and that".

     

    My neighbours have been in their home for over 40 years and they have had to contend with many changes during those years. I don't have any plans to bulldoze my renovated homes and develop the land. I was just making a point that two adjacent properties would be bulldozed by a developer who would put more than 10 homes on the large block.

    So you think that the best plan would be for them to move into a retirement home, buy their house and demolish the lot....likely enough space for 17+ homes.

    I don't have the heart (or the funds!) to do it.

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    There is more to life than making a buck. Some of the happiest people I know do not have much, enough though to live well enough. There is something about the pursuit of money for money's sake that makes those people unhappy and therefore defensive and I do not count any among my friends.

     

    Some people choose not to take the money path even when they can, it doesn't make them losers or stupid. It can be a positive choice usually making people happier and healthier in the long run.

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    There is more to life than making a buck. Some of the happiest people I know do not have much, enough though to live well enough. There is something about the pursuit of money for money's sake that makes those people unhappy and therefore defensive and I do not count any among my friends.

     

    Some people choose not to take the money path even when they can, it doesn't make them losers or stupid. It can be a positive choice usually making people happier and healthier in the long run.

     

    I like positive people.

    Positive attitude is an empathetic and clever indifference to others. and sober and mutual love to oneself.

    Going for a jog, smiling. People think that you are so kind because you send smiles to everyone. In reality though you can not care less what is going around you. You are jogging. You controlling breathing rate, pulse, you train your heart muscle. Massage after jogging.

    Green tea nights on Friday. Daily gym. More dietary fibre. You do not need troubles of everyday life. Water bottle in your hand - so skin never gets dehydrated. More flexibility in the joints. Vitamins - what am I saying.

    Everybody around is the same.

     

    There are some alien goblins who mix cement, lay bricks and lay sewerage. Let them be unhappy.

     

    On the serious note - you do not listen to what I am saying. I agree with you that characters who get more money for sake of getting more money have not a life, but a diagnosis.

     

    BUT. Main purpose of having ENOUGH money - is not to think about money.

     

    The other is also true - if you do not have your own wealth creation plan - means that you are the part of somebody else's wealth creation plan. And when you turn 45 - nobody would want you to make money for them. You becoming dangerous - you may resist fleecing. You are on the borrowed time.

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    My neighbours have been in their home for over 40 years and they have had to contend with many changes during those years. I don't have any plans to bulldoze my renovated homes and develop the land. I was just making a point that two adjacent properties would be bulldozed by a developer who would put more than 10 homes on the large block.

    So you think that the best plan would be for them to move into a retirement home, buy their house and demolish the lot....likely enough space for 17+ homes.

    I don't have the heart (or the funds!) to do it.

     

    You must be very rich to make such expensive gifts to people you do not know.

     

    Having heart to make money may mean retirement coming 10 years earlier.

     

    Getting development finance is not a rocket science. I do not know how old you are, but keep in mind that after 55 banks would not want to know you.

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    I have enough money not to worry thanks and I didn't make it from real estate. I retired before I was 50. Hubby still works part time because he still has stuff to give.

     

    We are happy with our lot thanks.

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    I have enough money not to worry thanks and I didn't make it from real estate. I retired before I was 50. Hubby still works part time because he still has stuff to give.

     

    We are happy with our lot thanks.

     

    No-no-no.

     

    You are not going to force me to mention Aesop and his 2000 year old fable "Fox and grapes"

     

    I am also not going to mention that the phrase "hubby still works" makes me to believe that you are not worried about money.

     

    There are also couple of other things that I would prefer not to mention that I ma not going to mention them, mainly due to the fact that I am married for 40 years.

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