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More redundancies

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    Guest Guest14361

    Afraid to say South Australia is going to the dogs, it's slowly dying, no wonder the state government wants the nuclear waste....

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    Why don't the workers buy the Car plant and keep it going, just change the name.

     

    I was told a couple of years ago the Tesla car company were interested in the Holden site and wanted to manufacturer an electric car (I was shown the design) there and keep many of the workers on. I was advised that Tesla had spoken to our Government and a particular MP, but they weren't interested in pursuing it! Maybe it would be too much for the grid if we all suddenly wanted to drive an electric car! Never heard anyone else mention it, so not sure if it is true or not.

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    Flinders University eyes staffing costs amid $30 million budget hole

     

    February 10, 2016 9:18pmTIM WILLIAMS EDUCATION REPORTERThe Advertiser

     

     

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    Vice-Chancellor of Flinders University, Professor Colin Stirling.FLINDERS

     

    University is plagued by “excessive bureaucracy” and wants to offer staff incentives to retire early in a bid to reduce a $30 million budget shortfall.

     

    The university has lodged proposals with the Australian Taxation Office for voluntary early retirement schemes providing “generous tax concessions and financial incentives” for both academic and professional staff.

     

    A recruitment freeze and strong student enrolments have helped reduce the budget hole but further measures were needed, Vice-Chancellor Colin Stirling has told staff in a letter obtained by The Advertiser.

     

    “The objective is not only to improve our budget position, but to regenerate our workforce,” Prof Stirling wrote.

     

    “The Tax Commissioner is currently considering the criteria for staff eligibility and financial incentives.”

     

    In a claim rubbished by unions, Mr Stirling wrote “excessive bureaucracy and hierarchy have been identified by staff across the university as key concerns” in recent consultations, prompting him to launch a review of administrative services.

     

    A similar review at Adelaide University has resulted in a centralisation of staff and the likely loss of at least 50 jobs.

     

    National Tertiary Education Union Flinders branch president Ron Slee said “the most bureaucratic thing that’s happened recently was something the vice-chancellor invented himself” — the process for applying for exemptions to the recruitment freeze which began late last year.

     

    It is not clear how many staff contracts have not been renewed under the freeze.

     

    Mr Slee said early retirement schemes were preferable to redundancies because people could be replaced, and he was looking forward to seeing the eligibility details from the Tax Office.

     

    But he said there was an ageist attitude behind such schemes.

     

    “The not very subtle implication is that anyone who’s getting older is not any good. Really the only focus here is that the younger (replacement) person will be cheaper,” he said.

     

    “The attitude is silly and offensive to experienced staff. It could result in losing your best people.”

     

    In his letter, Prof Stirling said the voluntary retirement schemes would be aimed at staff “whose aspirations no longer align with those of the university” as well as those nearing retirement.

     

    A university spokeswoman said the university would strive to retain high-performing staff.

     

    The union’s state secretary Kevin Rouse said the University of Adelaide and UniSA had run similar retirement schemes in recent years, and the usual practice was to replace experienced academics with casuals. He also questioned their value as savings measures.

     

    “If they wait a year or two those people would have retired anyway,” he said.

     

    Prof Stirling declined to be interviewed while the tax office process for the retirement schemes was ongoing.

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