Matsrossco

Learning to drive

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    My 17 year old son has a provisional license and will be in Adelaide in June. He's not started any driving lessons yet and I was looking for advice on where best he should try and pass his driving test - should he book block driving lessons in the UK before leaving or hold off until we arrive in Adelaide?

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    Cost wise I've no idea what the prices are in the UK and Aus.

     

    Also not sure on a newly passed driver of his age just driving in Aus. There may be some requirements like passing a written test.

     

    Only thing I would say is that it's possibly better to learn to drive here and then have the P plates than be just passed a UK test and then have to drive here as a P plater with hardly any experience. It can be a lot to take in in a new country even as an experienced driver and perhaps learning here and learning the Aus road rules etc would help and stand him in better stead. They seem pretty strict on P platers here and there are restrictions etc for them.

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    My 17 year old son has a provisional license and will be in Adelaide in June. He's not started any driving lessons yet and I was looking for advice on where best he should try and pass his driving test - should he book block driving lessons in the UK before leaving or hold off until we arrive in Adelaide?

     

    I don't know if things have changed in the UK, but if he can get his full licence before he comes over, I reckon that'd be the way to go.

     

    If he waits then he'll have to pass a test (computer) to get a permit. Once he has his permit he will have a minimum of a year and 75hours driving before he can try for his P1s. He'll have to pass a test obviously. At this point, he can drive alone, but there are rules. I'm not sure exactly how they stand at the moment, but I think it's no driving after midnight (unless you work and can provide a letter or something), no passengers other than one (?) rellie, a speed restriction...that kind of thing. He'd hold P1s for a minimum of a year, then take ashort test before getting his P2s. Your son then has a further year before he'd be on a full licence. So you can see why it might be easier to rush it through over there!

     

    I'm assuming that SA will recognise an international full licence irrespective of your son's age, but I really don't know. Hopefully someone will!

     

    :) LC

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    He's probably better off learning here as the driving is very 'different' here. You need to learn to drive as if everyone else is either going to cut you up, pull out in front of you then immediately slow down, not give way at roundabouts, race to get in front of you then slow down once there because that's how a lot of people drive here! I believe there are a lot of people who have never had lessons from instructors, and never had to pass a test so the driving can be quite an eye-opener.

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    My 17 year old son has a provisional license and will be in Adelaide in June. He's not started any driving lessons yet and I was looking for advice on where best he should try and pass his driving test - should he book block driving lessons in the UK before leaving or hold off until we arrive in Adelaide?

    Is a provisional license in the UK a learners permit am not sure how the system works now To me if he could get his full UK license then he would probably be able to swap it for an Aussie one but maybe as a P plater

    my grandchildren passed a written questionnaire to obtain their learners ,then had to keep a diary of the hours they did behind the wheel ( with me as teacher scary stuff ) then passed a test and got P plates

    if you go onto the SA government ezyreg site there is lots of information

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    I had friends who moved here from Mirfield in West Yorkshire.....their two daughters were 19 and 20 and they had both just passed their British driving test. They were given full licences here without the P restrictions...really irked my sons who were restricted by the AU system and had to be really careful with limited points whilst on p's. Both girls incurred demerit points on their licences...the same points would have been a disqualification for my sons!

    It's a loophole in the system. (or at least it was...this was 18 months ago). Don't see how they can restrict a British licence...maybe technically difficult?

    Would be better from a safety point of view (restrict young, inexperienced drivers) but doing the test in the UK sure had benefits for them. :smile:

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    I did my licence here last year, i did my learners and then my p's. I am 26 so a late driver! Learners you have to go into the service centre and answer 8 multiple choice questions, you need to get all these correct to pass. I then did my lessons, they were $65 per hour, i did my test in Christies Beach, it was ok, not too difficult. The only thing is here if he passes he will be on a provisional licence like me for 3 years before he can get his full licence where as if he was to pass in UK he would get a full licence here straight away. x

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    I would say get it in the uk, it just seems straight forward in the uk. Here as already stated you have to do the whole p plates ect :)

     

    Normally don't like to bag Adelaide, but I'd say - for all or sakes.........

     

    don't learn to drive like most people in South Australia do:

     

    The arrogance is unbelievable and the consideration of pedestrians (- and everyone else) anywhere near the road, or even in car parks, is sociopathic.

     

    Even if you need to do the Road Rules Test separately on arrival, get a decent UK Instructor to teach your son the art of driving and the benefits of road manners.

     

    Heaven forbid, if you do have to take lessons here, at least try to avoid the Log Book System which always seems to take twice as many lessons.

     

     

    JB :swoon:

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    Normally don't like to bag Adelaide, but I'd say - for all or sakes.........

     

    don't learn to drive like most people in South Australia do:

     

    The arrogance is unbelievable and the consideration of pedestrians (- and everyone else) anywhere near the road, or even in car parks, is sociopathic.

     

    Even if you need to do the Road Rules Test separately on arrival, get a decent UK Instructor to teach your son the art of driving and the benefits of road manners.

     

    Heaven forbid, if you do have to take lessons here, at least try to avoid the Log Book System which always seems to take twice as many lessons.

     

     

    JB :swoon:

    Aussie drivers ( and I am one )

    if there's a space between two cars driving get into it with no indicators

    drive at what ever speed you want in any lane

    dont even think of moving to the left to allow someone to overtake in the correct lane

    oh and think nothing of overtaking in the left lane

    Stop completely in the middle of a rounabout

    beware the man in the white hat especially if he is driving a ute

    I am by the way being very tongue in cheek here I learned to drive in the UK and was an experienced driver when we emigrated but have seen so many ?? in Adelaide

    I drive eyes peeled and looking for all eventualities but I suppose that should apply anywhere in the world

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    Thanks everyone for your comments - think I'll look into an intensive weeks course in UK to try and pass his test before he arrives in June. If he needs a few lessons to familiarise on roads when in Adelaide I'll arrange when we get there. So many things to arrange before we arrive - exciting!!!

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    A week's course and then he'll be considered a competent driver? Sorry, but to me that is ridiculous! Learning to drive is not just about knowing how to drive, it's about building up experience in different road conditions, light conditions, weather conditions, building up instincts about what might be going to happen or what that driver in front of you might be about to do. It's been scientifically proven anyway that teenagers' brains don't link actions and consequences in the same way as they do when they mature, and that's vital when driving.

     

    That's why the 75 hours here - some at night - that a learner has to do is a good idea (although I am sure quite a few parents lie about the hours in the logbook). Most P-plater accidents here are caused by inexperience even so, misjudging the time it will take to turn across traffic etc, so someone who had only had a week's intensive course.... as a parent, I wouldn't be happy with this at all for a child of mine. I personally think the P-plater restrictions here are a good thing - zero tolerance for alcohol, restricting distractions etc. Having a P-Plate displayed also means other drivers can see you're a less experienced driver.

     

    It's amazing how everyone bags Adelaide drivers, and yet probably thinks they themselves are wonderful at the skill. It's like the little old lady who says "never been in an accident myself, but seen hundreds"....

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    Maybe we should collect some PIA data..... Record on here every time someone else's poor driving causes us to swerve or use brakes over the course of a week, see whose driving nerves are the most frayed- uk or Aus!!

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    Aussie drivers ( and I am one )

    if there's a space between two cars driving get into it with no indicators

    drive at what ever speed you want in any lane

    dont even think of moving to the left to allow someone to overtake in the correct lane

    oh and think nothing of overtaking in the left lane

    Stop completely in the middle of a rounabout

    beware the man in the white hat especially if he is driving a ute

    I am by the way being very tongue in cheek here I learned to drive in the UK and was an experienced driver when we emigrated but have seen so many ?? in Adelaide

    I drive eyes peeled and looking for all eventualities but I suppose that should apply anywhere in the world

     

    You don't have to move over unless there are signs which state 'stay in left lane unless overtaking', it's perfectly legal (if somewhat dangerous) to overtake on the inside.

     

    The tricky thing is that learning in the UK will teach your children far better road manners but the rules are different here - such as when turning left at traffic lights and there are people crossing you have to give way to them, even though your light says green - and they'd need to learn those too.

     

    I think the most important thing about driving here is that if you stay within speed limits and are observant of all traffic then you should be OK; but DON'T ever stop to let someone out at a side junction because they'll sit and look at you like you've got 3 heads and not move!

     

    And to the OP - the RAA website is full of really useful information about driving in SA (other states have different rules again) - this section particularly: http://www.raa.com.au/motoring-and-road-safety/driver-education/learning-to-drive

    Edited by flossybeth
    added some stuff

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    I think I must be driving in a different city! I find driving in Adelaide really easy and the standard of driving far better than in the UK! I drive an automatic (always had manuals in the UK) which is really easy and personally I hated driving a manual when were back in the UK and had a hire car. When we were back in the UK last year, we found driving over there very unpleasant and stressful, the constant queues, the traffic, the roadworks, roads down to one lane because of all the cars parked either side and the constant speeding we were abused in a road rage incident with some chav in an Audi who didn't like the fact we were driving at 70mph (the speed limit!!!).

    Edited by Jessica Berry

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    I think I must be driving in a different city! I find driving in Adelaide really easy and the standard of driving far better than in the UK! I drive an automatic (always had manuals in the UK) which is really easy and personally I hated driving a manual when were back in the UK and had a hire car. When we were back in the UK last year, we found driving over there very unpleasant and stressful, the constant queues, the traffic, the roadworks, roads down to one lane because of all the cars parked either side and the constant speeding we were abused in a road rage incident with some chav in an Audi who didn't like the fact we were driving at 70mph (the speed limit!!!).

     

    I think the roads being bigger, wider and double lanes (sometimes triple) on most main roads make for more straightforward driving in terms of A to B. Also its more grid like which helps navigating and moving through traffic. People tend to commute on the main roads, not side roads or back routes as is common place in the UK. Aussies don't have windy twisty narrow streets, complex one way systems, double roundabouts and the like stacked up on top of each other. Nor do they really have to deal with 2 way traffic at higher speeds without a reservation or some such between them. Only once you get out of the built up area and into the hills do you really have those sorts of windy single roads for 2 way traffic and I've noticed most people are much more cautious on these.

     

    Parking catches many out I've noticed. Or else they just don't care to park their car properly. And the parking in the flow of traffic is a big one.

     

    I find the driving here as bad, sometimes worse than the UK. The tail gaiting on the long straight main roads here is horrible, as is the way drivers will just cut in front of you without indicating or checking and often almost hitting the side of your car in doing so (I've had a few near misses from this sort of thing). Also the speeding through red or amber lights seems to be a regular occurrence. An amber light at a set of lights seems to mean put your foot down to many and worse if they are behind you, the person breaking to stop.

     

    I am an experienced driver. I find it concerning that in 2.5 years of being here I've had more near misses here than in all my years driving elsewhere. Other peoples fault near misses. Inatentive, speed, jumping lights, weaving through traffic, failure to indicate and just move lanes... the list is long. I've driven in London, Hamburg, New York, Amsterdam, Paris and elsewhere and Adelaide is nothing compared to some of these but the drivers and the standard of driving here can be shocking. And people seem to lax about speed, lights, mobile phones when driving and so on. I know elsewhere its the same problems but Adelaide does have some aggressive drivers around no mistake. And plenty of slower than the speed limit ones to make the speedy ones a bit itchy on the gas peddle to overtake.

    Edited by snifter
    edited

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    "A week's course and then he'll be considered a competent driver? Sorry, but to me that is ridiculous!"

     

    That's not my reading of Mats plan at all, Diane:

     

    ...he goes on to talk about paying for additional lessons when they arrive -or as my Driving Instructor said when I got my license:

     

    "so, John, - now you've passed the test... now take the extra time to learn to drive really well"

     

     

    (And -after all- Mat really is trying to do the right thing, in what most of us will remember as extraordinarily stressful times

     

     

    JB :swoon:

     

    and by the way, Diane....I don't appreciate your allusion to Bull****...... we can probably do without that on this Forum

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    "A week's course and then he'll be considered a competent driver? Sorry, but to me that is ridiculous!"

     

    That's not my reading of Mats plan at all, Diane:

     

    ...he goes on to talk about paying for additional lessons when they arrive -or as my Driving Instructor said when I got my license:

     

    "so, John, - now you've passed the test... now take the extra time to learn to drive really well"

     

     

    (And -after all- Mat really is trying to do the right thing, in what most of us will remember as extraordinarily stressful times

     

     

    JB :swoon:

     

    and by the way, Diane....I don't appreciate your allusion to Bull****...... we can probably do without that on this Forum

     

    John - I think Diane is referring to the week's intensive course Mats suggested they'd book their son on.

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    That's not my reading of Mats plan at all, Diane:

     

    ...he goes on to talk about paying for additional lessons when they arrive -or as my Driving Instructor said when I got my license:

     

    "so, John, - now you've passed the test... now take the extra time to learn to drive really well"

     

     

    (And -after all- Mat really is trying to do the right thing, in what most of us will remember as extraordinarily stressful times

     

     

    JB :swoon:

     

    and by the way, Diane....I don't appreciate your allusion to Bull****...... we can probably do without that on this Forum

     

    A week's intensive course in the UK followed by a few lessons here doesn't equal 75 hour of driving experience over the minimum of a year.

     

    However you read it.

     

    And what's wrong with "bull****"? Don't you like bulls? is there swearing in there? You live in Australia and take offence at a couple of asterisks? Pur-lease.....

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    John - I think Diane is referring to the week's intensive course Mats suggested they'd book their son on.

     

     

    well let's see Diane/ Flossybeth.....

     

    (-c.m.if i"m wrong.) -Mats had the courtesy to let us in on his plan to book a weeks intensive driving course for his son in the UK, during the limited time available.

     

    he then goes on to talk about paying for additional lessons when they arrive.

    There is nothing in his responses to believe that he hasn't read, and understood, and considered all the advice he'd been given,

    before he reached his deadline for a decision

     

    How does decrying any part of his plan as "ridiculous" after he's made his informed decision (-or, indeed, making sly references to "bull****", in a footnote), -how does that raise the tone of this exchange.

     

    I repeat : Mat really is trying to do the right thing, in what most of us will remember as extraordinarily stressful times.

     

    He's gone to the trouble of confirming his decision with us

     

    Perhaps we can now find the good grace to let him now get on with it.JB :swoon:

     

    - So guys -How about if we try just a little bit more to address the problems (and reading the questions) of our new chums before pushing our own agendas? ...and maybe even accepting the decisions they make after we've had the opportunity to respond.

     

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    well let's see Diane/ Flossybeth.....

     

    (-c.m.if i"m wrong.) -Mats had the courtesy to let us in on his plan to book a weeks intensive driving course for his son in the UK, during the limited time available.

     

    he then goes on to talk about paying for additional lessons when they arrive.

    There is nothing in his responses to believe that he hasn't read, and understood, and considered all the advice he'd been given,

    before he reached his deadline for a decision

     

    How does decrying any part of his plan as "ridiculous" after he's made his informed decision (-or, indeed, making sly references to "bull****", in a footnote), -how does that raise the tone of this exchange.

     

    I repeat : Mat really is trying to do the right thing, in what most of us will remember as extraordinarily stressful times.

     

    He's gone to the trouble of confirming his decision with us

     

    Perhaps we can now find the good grace to let him now get on with it.JB :swoon:

     

    - So guys -How about if we try just a little bit more to address the problems (and reading the questions) of our new chums before pushing our own agendas? ...and maybe even accepting the decisions they make after we've had the opportunity to respond.

     

     

    It's a signature - you too can set one up if you wish (it's from the Settings option at the top of the page in case you want to) - not a 'sly reference' to anyone in particular or any particular post!

     

    And while we're on the topic of reading questions, what's your understanding of the word 'few' because it obviously differs from mine!

     

    I'm the mother of one recently qualified driver here in Australia and another on Ls, so I do actually know what I'm talking about on this subject... do you? I know what it's like as a parent when a newly qualified driver takes the car out on their own for the first time, and I know full well that a week and a few extra lessons does not a good driver make. Maybe that makes me an over-protective parent, but ensuring my offspring know how to drive properly protects other drivers on the roads as well as themselves.

     

    Over and above my daughter's 75 hours driving experience (and most learners have maybe a dozen paid lessons and the rest is with a family member, so again, a few lessons over here doesn't even begin to match what is considered the required amount of driving experience) I also paid for her to go on a Defensive Driving Course which is something I would recommend to anyone. Car safety has changed a lot since most of us parents learnt to drive, and what we were taught - and would pass on - is not necessarily the right thing to do these days.

     

    Putting someone behind the wheel of a car is effectively putting them in charge of a lethal weapon. Not something that should be rushed by any means.

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    Phew Flossy / Dianne / whatever / whoever

     

    (-No, seriously...do you often refer to yourself in the third person?....you really should see someone about that)

     

     

    Thank you so much for your various questions / comments:

     

     

    1. " Defensive Driving Course which is something I would recommend to anyone" :

    -couldn't agree with you more, Flossy / Di -Great Idea

     

    (... though you might want to mention the facilities down at Oaklands Park)

     

     

    1. "I'm the mother of one recently qualified driver here in Australia and another on Ls, so I do actually know what I'm talking about on this subject... do you?"

    well, no - your'e absolutely right - I'm not a mother, (- and have very little prospect of ever becoming one..... but you mustn't worry about that - I've learned to live with the reality of my situation)

     

    -However - with regard to my experience in the matter of Driving Lessons : namely - have I clinically assessed and advised people about their Physical / Mental capacity to drive and also fulfill their obligations under SA Legislation

     

    .... well I suppose I'd have to say: EMPHATICALLY YES, since you ask

    (-but don't let me go on about all that...people will say I'm just bragging)

     

     

    1. "And what's wrong with "bull****"? Don't you like bulls? is there swearing in there? You live in Australia and take offence at a couple of asterisks? Pur-lease"

    Well no, Flo' Di, Sweety, whatever ....... you see its not swearing that bothers me.

     

    It's the implication that people making comments on this Forum about their positive experiences of South Australia are are likely to be talking less than sincerely :

     

    "The grass always seems greener over there because it's fertilised by Bull****"

     

     

    -Really, just look at the way that would look to someone who is debating whether to give up their home and job; say good bye to their family and love ones; then travel half way around the planet to take up with ...well - with us lot.

     

    Come to think of it ... what must this exchange look like!!?

     

    (-oh, but I do hope people will forgive us our little contretemps)

     

    really nice to have caught up,

     

    all the best,

     

    try not to lie awake all night worrying about your little one's

     

     

    (-how I envy you)

     

     

    John Browning :swoon:

     

    1. PS "Don't you like bulls?" thanks so much for reminding me...there's a steak and a cheeky Shiraz Cabernet waiting for me right now

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    Thanks again everyone - it's good to see us Poms keep a sense of humour!! The weeks intensive UK course is to give my son a head start on driving and even if he passes or fails at he end of the week at least he will have an appreciation of driving safely so when we come over he will use what he's learned when training with an approved instructor on the Adelaide roads - I agree his and others safety on the roads is the most important thing - we've been there with his elder brother who we restricted in the UK until he gained more experience after passing his test. Reading what's written above, I've been driving over 30 years and I may need to refresh... Beep! Beep!

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