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    The Federal Budget Analysis prepared by the MLC Technical team, part of GWM Adviser Services Limited, appears below.

    2016 Federal Budget summary

     

    3 May 2016

     

    Treasurer Scott Morrison has handed down his first Federal Budget—the Coalition Government’s third. The winners are low and middle income earners and small business owners. There are significant changes to superannuation

    that could warrant further discussion with your financial adviser.

     

    Note: These changes are proposals only and may or may not be made law.

     

    Summary

     

    Date of effect: Immediate

     

    • A lifetime cap on non-concessional (after-tax) superannuation contributions of $500,000 will apply from 7.30 pm on 3 May 2016.

     

    Date of effect: 1 July 2016

    • The income tax threshold at which the 37% tax applies will increase to $87,001 pa, from the current $80,001 pa.

    • The tax rate that applies to small business companies will reduce to 27.5% for businesses with a turnover up to $10 million in 2016/17.

    Further tax concessions will apply in future financial years.

     

    Date of effect: 1 July 2017

     

    • The annual cap on concessional (pre-tax) super contributions will reduce to $25,000, regardless of age.

    • Concessional super contributions may exceed the annual cap if certain conditions are met.

    • Those aged between 65 and 74 will be able to make super contributions regardless of whether they work or not.

    • Tax deductions will be able to be claimed for personal contributions regardless of employment status.

    • A lifetime limit of $1.6m will be placed on the amount of superannuation that can be transferred to start pensions.

    • Earnings on investments held in ‘transition to retirement’ pensions will be taxed at 15% (currently 0%).

     

    Measures not announced or affected

     

    • Negative gearing
    • Age pension and other social security benegits

     

     

     

    Superannuation

    Changes effective 1 July 2017

     

    The following superannuation reforms are proposed to apply from 1 July 2017.

     

    Cap on concessional contributions

    The annual cap on concessional super contributions will reduce to $25,000, regardless of age. This change will reduce the amount of concessional contributions that can be made each year without a tax penalty. There will, however, also be the opportunity for certain people to contribute more if they haven’t fully utilised the cap in previous financial years—see below.

     

    Concessional contributions include:

     

    • salary sacrifice
    • superannuation guarantee
    • personal contributions claimed as a tax deduction, and
    • certain other amounts.

    Currently the cap on concessional contributions depends on age—see table below.

     

    [TABLE=width: 680]

    [TR]

    [TD=colspan: 3]Table 1: Concessional contribution caps

    [/TD]

    [/TR]

    [TR]

    [TD]Age

    [/TD]

    [TD=colspan: 2]Annual cap amount

    [/TD]

    [/TR]

    [TR]

    [TD][/TD]

    [TD]In 2015/16 and 2016/17

    [/TD]

    [TD]From 2017/18

    [/TD]

    [/TR]

    [TR]

    [TD]48 or under

    [/TD]

    [TD]$30,000

    [/TD]

    [TD]$25,000

    [/TD]

    [/TR]

    [TR]

    [TD]49 or over

    [/TD]

    [TD]$35,000

    [/TD]

    [TD]$25,000

    [/TD]

    [/TR]

    [/TABLE]

     

    Additional tax on concessional contributions

    Broadly, an additional 15% tax on concessional contributions will be payable by those earning more than $250,000 pa. Currently this additional tax, which is, broadly speaking payable on top of the standard maximum tax rate of 15% on concessional contributions, only applies to those earning more than $300,000 pa.

     

    [TABLE=width: 680, align: left]

    [TR]

    [TD=colspan: 3]Table 2: Tax on concessional contributions

    [/TD]

    [/TR]

    [TR]

    [TD]Income1

    [/TD]

    [TD=colspan: 2]Tax on concessional contributions made within the cap

    [/TD]

    [/TR]

    [TR]

    [TD][/TD]

    [TD]In 2015/16 and 2016/17

    [/TD]

    [TD]From 2017/18

    [/TD]

    [/TR]

    [TR]

    [TD]<$250,000

    [/TD]

    [TD]15%

    [/TD]

    [TD]15%

    [/TD]

    [/TR]

    [TR]

    [TD]$250,000 to $300,000

    [/TD]

    [TD]15%

    [/TD]

    [TD]30%

    [/TD]

    [/TR]

    [TR]

    [TD]$300,000+

    [/TD]

    [TD]30%

    [/TD]

    [TD]30%

    [/TD]

    [/TR]

    [/TABLE]

     

     

     

     

     

    Catch-up’ concessional contributions

     

    Concessional super contributions may exceed the annual cap if:

     

    • the annual cap in previous financial years is not fully utilised, and
    • the superannuation balance is less than $500,000.

    Only cap amounts unused from 1 July 2017 can be carried forward for up to five years.

    This measure will help eligible individuals who have not been able to utilise the caps due to broken work patterns or competing financial commitments, to make additional or ‘catch-up’ super contributions.

     

     

    1. Including concessional contributions.

     

    Contributions between ages 65 and 74

    Those aged between 65 and 74 will be able to make super contributions regardless of whether they work or not. Currently, you need to work 40 hours in 30 days in the relevant financial year to make super contributions in this age bracket.

     

    Tax deduction for super contributions

     

    Tax deductions will be able to be claimed for personal contributions regardless of employment status. Currently only self-employed people (eg sole traders) and those who earn less than 10% of total income from employment sources are eligible to claim a tax deduction.

    Superannuation pension limits

     

    A lifetime limit of $1.6m will be placed on the amount of superannuation that can be transferred to start pensions. This limit will be called the ‘transfer balance cap’.

     

    Earnings on investments held in pensions (other than transition to retirement pensions—see below) will continue to be taxed at 0%. Earnings on any balance that needs to remain in superannuation will continue to be taxed at 15%.

     

    People with existing pensions over $1.6 million will need to reduce the balance below this limit by 1 July 2017 to avoid penalties.

     

    Transition to retirement pensions

     

    Earnings on investments held in ‘transition to retirement’ pensions will be taxed at 15% (currently 0%). A transition to retirement pension is a pension that is started with superannuation money when you have reached your preservation age, which is between 55 and 60 depending on date of birth. Once permanently retired (or another condition of release is met), it is expected that the underlying earnings will then be taxed at 0%.

     

    Change effective immediately

     

    Changes to non-concessional contributions

     

    A lifetime non-concessional contribution (NCC) cap of $500,000 will apply from 7.30 pm on 3 May 2016. All NCCs made on or after 1 July 2007 will count towards this lifetime cap.

     

    NCCs include personal contributions made where no tax deduction is claimed, contributions made on behalf of a spouse and certain other amounts.

     

    Any contributions made after commencement exceeding the lifetime limit (as well as assumed earnings on these amounts), will be subject to penalty tax if not withdrawn.

     

    These measures will replace the current NCC cap of $180,000 pa, or $540,000 over a three year period if certain conditions are met.

     

    Taxation

     

    Personal tax rate changes

     

    Date of effect: 1 July 2016

     

    The income tax threshold at which the 37% tax applies will increase to $87,001 pa, from the current $80,001 pa. There are no other changes to marginal tax rates. Individual taxpayers with an income below the new threshold will not receive any tax cut. Those currently receiving above $80,000 pa will receive a tax saving. The maximum tax saving is $315 pa.

     

     

    [TABLE=width: 641]

    [TR]

    [TD=colspan: 4]Table 3: Comparison of tax rates and thresholds

    [/TD]

    [/TR]

    [TR]

    [TD]Current tax thresholds 2015/16

    [/TD]

    [TD]Tax rate

    [/TD]

    [TD]New tax thresholds 2016/17

    [/TD]

    [TD]Tax rate

    [/TD]

    [/TR]

    [TR]

    [TD]$0–$18,200

    [/TD]

    [TD]0%

    [/TD]

    [TD]$0–$18,200

    [/TD]

    [TD]0%

    [/TD]

    [/TR]

    [TR]

    [TD]$18,201 –$37,000

    [/TD]

    [TD]19%

    [/TD]

    [TD]$18,201–$37,000

    [/TD]

    [TD]19%

    [/TD]

    [/TR]

    [TR]

    [TD]$37,001–$80,000

    [/TD]

    [TD]32.5%

    [/TD]

    [TD]$37,001–$87,000

    [/TD]

    [TD]32.5%

    [/TD]

    [/TR]

    [TR]

    [TD]$80,001–$180,000

    [/TD]

    [TD]37%

    [/TD]

    [TD]$87,001–$180,000

    [/TD]

    [TD]37%

    [/TD]

    [/TR]

    [TR]

    [TD]$180,000+

    [/TD]

    [TD]45%

    [/TD]

    [TD]$180,000+

    [/TD]

    [TD]45%

    [/TD]

    [/TR]

    [/TABLE]

     

     

    Note: These tax rates do not include the Medicare levy and Temporary Budget Repair Levy

     

    Other personal tax matters

     

    The table below summarises some other personal tax issues raised and their implementation dates.

    [TABLE=width: 640, align: left]

    [TR]

    [TD=colspan: 3]Table 4: Other personal tax matters

    [/TD]

    [/TR]

    [TR]

    [TD]Date of effect

    [/TD]

    [TD]Measures

    [/TD]

    [TD]Detail

    [/TD]

    [/TR]

    [TR]

    [TD]1 July 2017

    [/TD]

    [TD]Spouse superannuation tax offset

    [/TD]

    [TD]

     

    • The spouse income threshold will increase from $10,800 pa to $37,000 pa
    • The maximum tax offset will remain at $540

    [/TD]

    [/TR]

    [TR]

    [TD]1 July 2017

    [/TD]

    [TD]Temporary Budget Repair Levy

    [/TD]

    [TD]This levy, which is 2% of taxable income in excess of $180,000 will expire on 30 June 2017, as legislated.

    [/TD]

    [/TR]

    [/TABLE]

     

    Company tax rate

     

    Date of effect: 1 July 2016 and beyond

    The tax rate that applies to small business companies will reduce to 27.5% for businesses with a turnover up to $10 million in 2016/17 and will be extended to larger business thereafter.

     

    [TABLE=width: 640]

    [TR]

    [TD=colspan: 8]Table 5: Maximum business turnover to be eligible for 27.5% company rate

    [/TD]

    [/TR]

    [TR]

    [TD]Tax year

    [/TD]

    [TD]2016/17

    [/TD]

    [TD]2017/18

    [/TD]

    [TD]2018/19

    [/TD]

    [TD]2019/20

    [/TD]

    [TD]2020/21

    [/TD]

    [TD]2021/22

    [/TD]

    [TD]2022/23

    [/TD]

    [/TR]

    [TR]

    [TD]Turn over

    [/TD]

    [TD]$10m

    [/TD]

    [TD]$25m

    [/TD]

    [TD]$50m

    [/TD]

    [TD]$100m

    [/TD]

    [TD]$250m

    [/TD]

    [TD]$500m

    [/TD]

    [TD]$1b

    [/TD]

    [/TR]

    [/TABLE]

     

    From 1 July 2024, the company tax rate will progressively reduce to 25%.

    [TABLE=width: 640, align: left]

    [TR]

    [TD=colspan: 4]Table 6: Further company tax rate changes

    [/TD]

    [/TR]

    [TR]

    [TD]Tax year

    [/TD]

    [TD]2024/25

    [/TD]

    [TD]2025/26

    [/TD]

    [TD]2026/27

    [/TD]

    [/TR]

    [TR]

    [TD]All companies

    [/TD]

    [TD]27%

    [/TD]

    [TD]26%

    [/TD]

    [TD]25%

    [/TD]

    [/TR]

    [/TABLE]

     

    Measures not announced or affected

    Negative gearing

    No changes will be made to negative gearing.

     

    Age pension

    No changes were announced that effect age pension eligibility or payment rates. Some important changes to the aged pension assets test have, however, already been legislated that take effect on 1 January 2017. These changes could impact benefits.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    The information contained in this Federal Budget Analysis is current as at 3 May 2016 and is prepared by MLC Technical, part of GWM Adviser Services Limited ABN 96 002 071749, registered office 150-153 Miller Street North Sydney NSW 2060, a member of the National Australia Bank Group of Companies.

    Any advice in this Federal Budget Analysis has been prepared without taking account of your objectives, financial situation or needs. Because of this you should, before acting on any advice, consider whether it is appropriate to your objectives, financial situation and needs.

    Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future performance.

    Before acquiring a financial product, you should obtain a Product Disclosure Statement (PDS) relating to that product and consider the contents of the PDS before making a decision about whether to acquire the product.

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