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maidensarah

Hi everyone

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Thought I would join this forum and say hi as I'm already an unregular member of Pomsinoz. I'm not actually in 'oz' yet but my husband and I are looking at the possibility of doing an EOI and then applying for a 190 visa. He is a senior finance manager and I believe his occupation is on the CSOL list for SA.

I have been to Australia before 10 years ago for a year on a WHV but only spent time in NSW and QLD.

My husband has never been before, or our two children aged 5 and 3.

We are only in talks about this at the moment as there is a lot of research to be done but is something we've talked on and off about for years.

 

I don't know much about SA so wondering if any of you can tell me about your experiences of living there, the suburbs, the people etc.

 

We have a nice life here and are not looking to move as we are unhappy but more for adventure and experience. If we don't we might always wonder etc

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Welcome to the forum.

 

When you say SA, do you really mean SA as a whole or would you be looking at moving to Adelaide? I'll assume Adelaide and surrounds for now. Adelaide itself is really more of a large town than a city and if you are looking for big city living then you are definitely coming to the wrong place. I love Adelaide because it isn't a big city. Most of the time it's not particularly busy and the CBD is easy to get round on foot. The wider suburbs do sprawl somewhat and vary between the old and estabilshed to the brand new. Even in the older, established areas there is a fair bit of redevelopment going on where old houses are knocked down and two or three new ones built in its place.

 

The suburbs of Adelaide are roughly split in to North, East, West and South, although the North East is often referred to separately to the North. There are not that great suburbs all over but the North seems to have slightly more than it's fair share of them. The North East on the other hand tends to be much nicer. The Eastern and Western suburbs are all pretty close to the CBD because you can only go so far west before hitting the sea and so far East before hitting the hills. There are areas in the hills, but to the east of the city the suburbs tend to end and then you a bit further and start reaching other little towns that are towns in there own right. The inner southern suburbs, such as Unley, are generally referred to as being in the east and it's the suburbs further out that are considered southern. The far southern suburbs used to be much cheaper and were great places to get beachside living for much less than in the west, partly because they were so far out and travel time to the CBD was off putting for a lot of people. However now we have a two way express way and upgrading rail lines the travel time has been much reduced and the far southern suburbs are becoming more popular and hence more expensive.

 

Finding work in Adelaide can be interesting. It is very much a small town in that it can be who you know rather than what you know. In my OH's experience Government departments can be sole destroying places to work, especially if you are used working with competent people making good decisions. Not that all government employees are incompetent but a lot of senior managers seem to get jobs because they have been there forever, or know someone, and they don't like employees challenging the way things are done. Other employers aren't nearly as bad but they can still be difficult to break in to. Often it's worth taking a casual contract just to get a foot in the door in a place.

 

Weather wise it gets hot in summer and cold in winter. Houses, especially rentals, tend to be poorly insulated and not well heated. I have never been as cold as I was in our qrental in winter. I find that people are generally people. Some are nice and friendly, others are idiots, some are friendly idiots. A bit like anywhere really. On the whole I like Adelaide and have been very happy here.

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Thanks NicF for your reply and all of the information.

I guess I would mean Adelaide yes as I would assume that would be better for job opportunities.

 

We live in what is considered a large town in England (212000 people), the whole of the shire has about 700,000.

So Adelaide would still be a lot bigger than we are now, though I have no desire to live in a large city. Ideally somewhere close to a nice beach, 30m max commute to city centre, assuming that's where work can be found, nice schools etc etc. However although my husband's role is on SA's CSOL list, I'm not sure how easy it would be for him to find a job in that role, being a smaller city that the others.

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Hi Sarah, and welcome :smile:,

 

We moved here because we could, so I get your desire for 'experience and adventure'! We had a good life in Kent, in a small town (c38k people), with a nice home, good friends, ok jobs etc, but my OH had always wanted to stretch his wings, so we did.

 

I think you soon learn that experience and adventure only lasts for so long, then it becomes the same as before. We've exchanged some pluses from being in the UK for others here. Our kids were older than yours would be, when / if you get here, but have both gone through everything from primary school to uni. Neither has regretted being here, although one misses his rellies quite a bit.

 

I enjoy my life here, much as I did there. I do miss the friends we had there, not because we don't have them here lol, but just that sense of history, shared experiences from when our kids were littlies, or from when my husband and I were kids ourselves. Saying that, we don't want to move back, and have never really contemplated that.

 

I guess what I'm saying is, adventure is yours wherever you are, if you're happy together there, I'm sure you'll be happy together here. Finding work can be difficult, or you might both find work in an instant, probably the same as anywhere. I do agree that, particularly in there more challenging times, work can come down to who you know, but I think that's understandable (in a way). Maybe simply a desire to ensure the person you select will be a keeper lol :wink:.

 

The suburbs, particularly those surrounding the city, roll into one another pretty much seamlessly. I wouldn't worry so much about names of particular suburbs at first, more areas in the way NicF has described them. Then have a look when you get here, there's something for everyone :cute:.

 

Would you come for a visit prior to migrating? We didn't, and it worked for us,although SA wasn't quite as I'd imagined it. I'm not sure whether I'd recommend a visit first. I know you have a good idea of what to expect, though we're not like Qld; NSW (depending where you were) would perhaps be more like SA, but migration can be an expensive decision.

 

If you search (I can't right now as the dogs are waiting to get to the beach!) there was a looong thread on here about why people like SA. Maybe that would be fun for you to read?

 

We like SA. We like being near the beach, the countryside, the way you can see the hills around the city, the noisy birds, the older houses, the history..it's our home.

 

Hope some of my waffle proves helpful!

 

LC

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Thanks for your reply, LC.

 

It is just the scariness of moving to the unknown. Especially when things are comfortable here. I can't say we have any major friends ties, which sounds odd, but my friends from school, the ones I've known years, I see a few times a year, none have children like me so that creates an huge difference in lifestyle/priorities. Don't get me wrong, when we meet up we can chat for ever with no problem but it's that shared history and childhood that keeps it going. None of them I would rely on. Same for my husband's friends. He has some good friends he made at uni but with them all living in different locations/towns/cities they also only meet a few times a year. I have made some friends through son's school but it's more people I chat to at the gates and coffee occasionally.

I am close-ish to my family and see fairly regularly but we do not rely on them much for childcare/babysitting, as some people miss their family for that element too, as well as just missing them. and my husband's family also live 4 hours' drive away.

The main reasons I wouldn't want to move are that I love our house (it's new and we've only been here a year), the town is okay but nice location opposite some woods. Son goes to a nice school. Plus my husband has a very good job and earns a lot so giving that up to go to ??? Would it be matched?

I do find the greyness of England annoying, I love sunshine but we only get the odd days or maybe a few at a time. We live a couple of hours from a beach. My daughter my youngest loves the beach (in the sun)

We have a 6 month old yellow lab puppy who we would of course bring (expensive I know)

 

i dont think we would do a trip first which is obviously risky but you can't really get a proper feel for a place unless you've lived there a while anyway. It would just be a holiday and cost a lot which could be used elsewhere. Plus the fewer long flights with my children at this age the better!

 

Ah, desicions decisions. I think it says a lot about Australia though that I still think about it a lot 10 years after coming home from there.

Edited by maidensarah

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Hi Sarah and welcome

 

We lived in NSW for 4 years back in 2004-2008 but had to go back to the UK for various reasons and like you, we were always thinking about going back at some point. We were lucky in that an opportunity came up to move to Adelaide and we absolutely love it here. We had not visited SA during our 4 years in NSW so had no idea what we were moving to. We have 2 kids (7 and 10) and they have settled really well in school. I really like the fact that Adelaide is small (makes getting around really easy) but there is a lot going on all year round plus its great for families and kids.

 

I spent a lot of time looking at different suburbs online before we came out here and we were convinced that we were going to live by the beach but it all seemed so different when we arrived and we are now living in a lovely area in the east but its still only a 30 min drive to the beach, very close to the hills and super easy to get to the city.

 

Of course we miss our families and the history we have with the friends we have known since the kids were small but we look at all the positives that we have here in Australia and consider ourselves very lucky.

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Beachside suburbs that fall in the western suburbs tend to come with a hefty price tag. They are probably around 30 minutes commute in a car but rush hour could mean longer travelling times. Train or tram could be quicker depending where travelling from and to exactly.

 

Other beachside suburbs see you going further south and probably longer travelling times in rush hour. If you go north west way it could be more reasonable travel times but could be longer, again depends on area. Although house prices may be cheaper the further south you go, will depend on the exact suburb and those around it and facilities etc.

 

We started off in a beachside suburb, Glenelg, were there for 7 months, a few minutes walk from the beach and Jetty road. Reality was for me that after a while the appeal of living there wore off, we didn't go to the beach that much that it was a big thing for us to be so close and it was expensive. We wanted a bit more peace and quiet and found somewhere up in the hills and are still only a short drive to the beaches. Ten, fifteen minutes in the car and we can be there whenever we feel like it but have a bit more scenery, wildlife and gum trees around us. In non rush hour can be in the CBD within thirty mins or so, rush hour it's more like forty, forty five.

 

Keep in in mind that sunshine is lovely but the heat can be horrible. And the UV here is very high in the warmer months, even on CloudKit or overcast days. The reality is that on a hot day, we are not out enjoying th sun but seeking cool and shade and doing our activities and stuff in the early morning and evening where possible. It doesn't stop us enjoying ourselves or ruin our plans but some days I really don't want to be out in the heat as it's bloody horrible hot, hairdryer in the face on full blast sort of thing.

 

We are are really happy here in Adelaide. It's been a positive move for us and as a family it was the right move for us and we have no real regrets. I am off to the UK in a couple of months for another visit but have made it shorter this time as could not cope being there for a month again, two weeks is my limit now. I am only visiting to see parents but will make good use of my time to see a few friends also. But otherwise I don't worry and dont feel like I am missing out. I'm always happy to get back home to a Adelaide.

 

I can't say do or don't move, it's your call. Go into a move with your eyes open and don't expect it to be easy, especially the first couple of years. Hopefully things will fall into place sooner but it can take a while to find work, build a few friendships and find your feet till you feel a home.

Edited by snifter
edited

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Thanks Snifter. Where you live sounds lovely, and with only a short drive to the beach it's no problem.

We certainly wouldn't be able to afford a hefty price tag. Assuming we can afford the same price as here then we would be looking at about $500k AUD. I'm not sure what this would afford in decent suburbs.

 

I definitely wouldn't be going with rose tinted glasses. Well, maybe a little bit. But I know finding work could be a struggle etc. and feeling settled would take time.

 

I remember the heat of QLD in the summer! And in Sydney on New Year's Day 2006, 42degrees! But cloudy and flies everywhere. That was a weird day! Stayed in pubs/bars for air conditioning lol

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Put your budget into realestate.com.au and pick some western suburbs like Glenelg, Brighton, Seacliff, Henley Beach and chances are 500k won't get you much. Put that price range in for Hallet Cove, Noarlunga and down south you'll get more for your money. For me the compromise is being further out from the city and things like school options. North west I can't really comment as don't know it or go there hardly ever. I find it too tucked away up there and as it's not somewhere we need to visit so don't.

 

You can live in more affordable suburbs and still be within easy driving distance of the coast and beaches.

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Hallet Cove and Noarlunga both look very nice :)

 

Plenty of migrants buy or settle in those suburbs (Noarlunga, I was thinking Port Noarlunga when I wrote it) or ones close to them as they are coastal and often much cheaper than the ones nearer the city and lying to to the west. Not sure either will fall into your 30 minute commute to the CBD (especially during rush hour) if travelling by car. If going by bus I doubt it also. Train could be ok but there is still the travel time to the train station from wherever you would be living so that could make it longer each day.

 

Research areas carefully around there as some of the suburbs around there may not be what you had in mind. Also research facilities and things you want from an area overall. Also schools and childcare options if they are important and/or required.

Edited by snifter
eta

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Welcome to the site. Like you, I came over on a working holiday visa and travelled around Australia and loved it and always hoped to return. Then 10 years later I emigrated with my OH who like your husband had never been to Australia before. Our visa allowed us to live anywhere in Australia, but I made the decision that Adelaide would be a good fit for us and as my OH had never been before he was happy to trust my judgement. We have been here nearly 10 years now and enjoy life in Adelaide/Australia and feel we have a good standard of living here and were grateful we had the opportunity to emigrate to Australia. I think peoples expectations and attitudes play a large part in whether people settle and make a 'success' of it. We have worked hard and worked as a team to achieve our goals and make a good life for ourselves here.

 

FYI - Just in case you aren't aware, when you look at houses on realestate.com.au you will need to add stamp duty onto the asking price, so factor this into your budget. For example on a $500k house, the stamp duty will be $21,330...

 

http://www.revenuesa.sa.gov.au/taxes-and-duties/stamp-duties/calculators/stamp-duty-on-conveyances-calculator-new

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Thank you. Yes will do. The school would have to be the most important option, and area overall. It's no good being in a not so nice area even if it is by the beach. Good school and areas often go alongside one another so that would be the first thing for us to look into.

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Welcome to the site. Like you, I came over on a working holiday visa and travelled around Australia and loved it and always hoped to return. Then 10 years later I emigrated with my OH who like your husband had never been to Australia before. Our visa allowed us to live anywhere in Australia, but I made the decision that Adelaide would be a good fit for us and as my OH had never been before he was happy to trust my judgement. We have been here nearly 10 years now and enjoy life in Adelaide/Australia and feel we have a good standard of living here and were grateful we had the opportunity to emigrate to Australia. I think peoples expectations and attitudes play a large part in whether people settle and make a 'success' of it. We have worked hard and worked as a team to achieve our goals and make a good life for ourselves here.

 

FYI - Just in case you aren't aware, when you look at houses on realestate.com.au you will need to add stamp duty onto the asking price, so factor this into your budget. For example on a $500k house, the stamp duty will be $21,330...

 

http://www.revenuesa.sa.gov.au/taxes-and-duties/stamp-duties/calculators/stamp-duty-on-conveyances-calculator-new

 

Thank you, Jessica.

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