julie-ruth

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    Qantas has been ordered to check all oxygen cannisters on its fleet of Boeing 747s by Australia's Civil Aviation Authority (CASA).

     

     

    15057397.jpg

    The hole in Qantas 747 'Spirit Of Australia', which landed in Manila

     

    The order came after a 747 bound for Melbourne was forced to make an emergency landing in Manila last Friday.

    Although the cause of the blast has not been confirmed, a spokesman for CASA said the order was made to put safety first.

    "We do know there were two oxygen bottles in that area, we do know they're a main focus of the investigation.

    "And we think it's prudent to put safety first, to get inspections done now rather than wait any longer," Peter Gibson said.

    Qantas have agreed to carry out inspections on its fleet of around 30 Boeing 747s.

    Passengers of the troubled aircraft had reported hearing a loud bang before the aircraft rapidly lost altitude and said the Boeing 747-400 had a hole the size of a mini-van on the right of its fuselage when it landed in the Philippine capital.

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    Guest TC for short

    To try to reassure you all...

     

    The reason behind the O2 bottle check (as far as I'm aware) is because O2 and grease are a highly volatile mix and can explode when combined. It's not an inherent fault with the cannisters per se.

     

    Whatever the source was, the result was what is known as explosive decompression. At altitude the cabin is pressurised to about 6-8000 feet (as if you were stood at the top of the Alps). The outside atmosphere is obviously at a much lower pressure so when you get a hole the air inside rushes out. The average person will only last a couple of minutes at this altitude before losing conciousness due to lack of oxygen, so when it detects a loss of pressure the aircraft will automatically drop the "rubber jungle" of masks for you to put on. It will get cold & hazy as warm air goes & dirt is sucked up off the cabin floor. The sudden descent is the pilots getting the aircraft down to around 10 000 feet where you can breathe normally again (& it's a lot warmer). In such a situation they can descend in excess of 10 000 per min so it will only take 3 mins from 40 000 feet to 10 000. The whole thing is something that is practiced in the simulator a lot.

     

    This sort of thing is rare, though, and more people are kicked to death by donkeys than die in air accidents! Honest!

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    Guest Shy Ted

    How many people survive a donkey kicking? ;)

     

    Good post though.

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    Guest Martin and Val

    16_3_166.gif EEE OOOR

     

    Ouch,either would hurt:biglaugh:

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    Guest rockpool crab
    How many people survive a donkey kicking? ;)

     

    Good post though.

     

    Hi here, not sure of the answer to that one...but..whilst on holiday recently we thought we'd try scuba diving. I was keen to find out the chances of there being sharks in Fuertaventura and was told "they're all on the other side of the island"...mmm...then the guy proceeded to tell me that 200 people a year die of coconuts falling on their head and only 2 people a year of shark attacks. Needless to say it didn't stop me going in but all the time I did wonder if any sharks on the other side of the island might get lost and come round to my side!...:biglaugh:

     

    Carol Ann

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