niknjas

School performance

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    Hi

     

    Been reading some of the threads on here re schooling and wondered if they do not have Ofsted reports/ league tables, how they measure a schools performance and how you can know whether you're sending your child to a good or bad school - any info anyone?

     

    Niki

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    Nope no league tables here, you just got to keep your ear to the ground, listen to other peoples experiences AND most importantly make a list of what you need from your child's school. Schooling especially in early primary is going to be very different to what you have in the UK. The thing to do is not to panic but to look further up at the older kids leaving the school, how do they treat each other, how do you feel when you walk into the school for the first time. What is the work like on the walls and how do the teachers talk to the kids, if they are relaxed then there are probably no major behavioural issues in the class. What you have to do is get out there with your mental list and look at the schools in your area, find the one that ticks all or most of your boxes and then give it a go. Australian kids do end up employed/ at Uni or TAFE and happy. Of course like everywhere there are those that don't get the family backing or are just plain ratbags. If you encourage your child to do well and to do home work and study as required then your child should do well in all but the worst schools. You will know if you walk into one of these schools cos you wont want to be there.

     

    Other than that you can get background info from the school's context statement which covers enrolment numbers, statistical ethnicity, the area the school is in, the facilities etc. Each state school has one and they are usually on the school's website. You can find the websites here... www.decs.sa.gov.au

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    Guest Libby1971

    :mad:With respect, league tables are all cr*p anyway. Teachers teach to the test as finding is awarded to the higher performing/ improving schools while the inspectors also stay away...the ones that haven't been in a classroom for more than 10 years and so have no idea about the issues anyway.:realmad:

     

    Headteachers are under so much pressure to deliver results that teachers can be under instructions to teach nothing but English, Maths and Science for months at a time (i.e. from Jan for a year 6 class). In areas of social or financial deprivation, the teaching is often better than at other schools IMO.

     

    Here, you have to use your own judgement about the schools. Far far better than artificial classifications concocted by a govt dept with little else to do to justify it's over the top salary.

     

    There! I have put my soapbox away now

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    :mad:With respect, league tables are all cr*p anyway. Teachers teach to the test as finding is awarded to the higher performing/ improving schools while the inspectors also stay away...the ones that haven't been in a classroom for more than 10 years and so have no idea about the issues anyway.:realmad:

     

    Headteachers are under so much pressure to deliver results that teachers can be under instructions to teach nothing but English, Maths and Science for months at a time (i.e. from Jan for a year 6 class). In areas of social or financial deprivation, the teaching is often better than at other schools IMO.

     

    Here, you have to use your own judgement about the schools. Far far better than artificial classifications concocted by a govt dept with little else to do to justify it's over the top salary.

     

    There! I have put my soapbox away now

     

     

    Libby, good on'ya:notworthy:, i think what you said is just what most people think. Massaging figures works for Govt. but most ordinary folk realise thats all it is, bu..s..t!

     

    Good teachers + good kids = results

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    Guest Trakki

    When we walked into Woodcroft school we just knew it was right there and then, the head teacher who showed us round knew all the children by name, (about 900in the school) and also what many of the parents names were and what jobs they did and when he found out we had not been here long was giving us contact numbers of people who could helpus if needed. My oldest had no confidence at all in the UK and was so quiet at school. Within a few weeks of starting school here he was standing infront of the class doing show and tell, something he never would have done in the UK. Education wise they are at the same level as in the UK, (well was when they started) and are excelling in all subjects whereas in the UK they did well but only in one or two subjects. Giving them confidence and all the other aspects of life that the schools work on is far more important at an early age. The context statements as Rachel said give you a fair idea but I firmly believe that you will know if it is right the moment you walk through the gates.

     

    HTH

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    Guest Libby1971

    Trakki is absolutely right. Our girls were also a bit older and we felt it was important to also listen to their opinions although I appreciate this is not always possible if your children are too young.

     

    Both our girls viewed the schools separately. They had a list of questions they wanted answers to and we were told to ask them if they did not. Once home, we had a cup of tea and a choc mud cake (as perfect a mix of Northern/ Southern hemisphere cuisine as I can think of!!!) and chatted about it. Both liked the one we went for.

     

    It wasn't the glitziest but they did have children who were polite, with lively classrooms, kids focused on lessons, a Headteacher walking round and popping into lessons - which I like. When we stopped in the DT area, one of the boys there said hello and we talked about his work and he showed us various other items around the room. We were blown away by his manners, confidence, skills etc and thought this was a school we would be happy to send our kids to. The fact they wanted to go to it was a bonus...

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    Thanks everyone, I appreciate your honesty. I admit that this was something I've been really concerned about as Charlie does tend to be on the quiet side and stand back a bit. At least now when we all go and lookat the school it's not just me being uncomfortable or a cynic and just trust our eyes, Charlie's feedback and gut instinct.

     

    Niki

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    Guest guest5218

    New website just come out this week helps to put things in perspective re how well kids doing at school lit and numeracy results. Find on: www.myschool.sa.edu.au

     

    cheers.!

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    Guest Messua

    We left England the day my eldest son would have done his tests. He was 6! The teachers were so concerned about the school's reputation that they had taught the kids purely with them in mind. I had to call in at the school to get a report and there were children sick with worry, queuing up to go to their classrooms. It was obscene! The schools are only as good as the teachers working there, and as this regularly changes in SA, especially in the public system, you can really only ask about the teachers. We've had teachers for whom it was obviously a calling with a talent and a passion for education, but we've also had a couple of teachers, who, in my opinion, should never have been allowed to work with children! It also helps if the principal has the respect of his staff.

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    Trakki is absolutely right. Our girls were also a bit older and we felt it was important to also listen to their opinions although I appreciate this is not always possible if your children are too young.

     

    Both our girls viewed the schools separately. They had a list of questions they wanted answers to and we were told to ask them if they did not. Once home, we had a cup of tea and a choc mud cake (as perfect a mix of Northern/ Southern hemisphere cuisine as I can think of!!!) and chatted about it. Both liked the one we went for.

     

    It wasn't the glitziest but they did have children who were polite, with lively classrooms, kids focused on lessons, a Headteacher walking round and popping into lessons - which I like. When we stopped in the DT area, one of the boys there said hello and we talked about his work and he showed us various other items around the room. We were blown away by his manners, confidence, skills etc and thought this was a school we would be happy to send our kids to. The fact they wanted to go to it was a bonus...

     

     

    Hi

     

    Just wondered which school they chose, out of interest. Have been looking at schools in this area with both boys, 11 and 13.

     

    Have also told them, (if we ever get there!), that we will take them to look around and get a feel for the schools before any decisions are made.

    Would just be good to know which appealed to your girls....positive feedback etc.

     

    Thanks. :jiggy:

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    Hi

    Charlie started at Christies Beach Primary this morning. Had liked the look of the school as wlaked past it and heard good reports from locals and pia peeps. This was the second school that I had gone to with Charlie. the first school seemed very frinedly and the principal knew allt he kids by name and would have a laugh and a joke with them. was a little run down but he had just taken over as it had not been performing that well and that was why he had been brought in. Although I like the school, was not sure how long it would take for the school to be at a good performance level so went with gut instinct for other school. He liked this one as well.

    Niki

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