Guest steve.parkin

is it all milk and honey

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    Guest steve.parkin

    Hi everyone.

    Just got news that some friends of ours are coming back from Adelaide.

    They only went in Augast .They said it was a great place but just missed the UK and family and friends too much.Found it hard to meet good friends again, the ones you can talk about anything about. The people they met where brilliant but not mates as we know them. The work was'nt up to much either. She had to get wot was on offer and got all the rubbish hours. It was'nt all plain sailing and wot it was all cracked up to be.

     

    Also gas fitter mate went to Brisbane and he came back last year cos couldnt find any good paid jobs.

    Also police friend went two years ago and he has stuck it out but said he hated the work cos looked down on by the Ozzy cops. Poo hours etc

    He has now left the police and gone Private Investigator.

     

    Anybody know anybody else who has come back. And Why.'

     

    Good luck every body

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    No it's not the land of milk and honey, it's the land of hardwork and flexibility. When you've sorted this out you may begin to feel that you reap the benefits. Many migrants who come from other countries not the UK actually expect to work their butts off to get where they want.

     

    As for friends and families, you are never going to be able to replace these in just a few months. Probably some of your friends are ones you went to school with, so when you find yourself living away it takes time to get that commonalities with people where you have shared a certain length of time or experiences and can talk about anything...It depends too on what type of person you are, some can upsticks easily and others find out they are really dependent on the people and places they already know.

     

    Jobs, well same really, sometimes you just have to take what you can get and use it to get somewhere else. It can take time.

     

    If you come and expect it to be harder than you think then it can begin to resemble milk and honey.

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    Guest sarahsmartiepants

    If you come here and expect milk and honey straight off then you are going to fail, sorry thats the way it is. If you are not flexable and willing to take a few steps back then you will fail, if you expect everything the same as the Uk but better then failure agian. It is not the UK, the wages and work conditions are sometimes crap. And your friends and family are not here, so think hard about wether or not you can live without them BEFORE you start the process.

    So many people fall down at the first hard knock Australia gives them because they were expecting milk and honey! But more get up dust themselves down and give it another go.

    I dont consider 5 months is long enough to give anything a proper try!

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    Guest cazzie

    The milk and honey part for me are the stunning beaches. Everytime I visit a new beach, I am just blown away. I think the South coast is absolutely gorgeous and the country scenery ie: Myponga reservoir and surrounding hills is lovely. I can't wait to visit Mt Gambier and the blue lake, Kangaroo Island etc. As for the jobs/money, there are many people on PIA who have a much better quality of life both materially and financially, I personally haven't but these things are not a priority for me. I have moved to the other side of the world to be with Bill (my Lord Lucan) and in that respect I couldn't be happier.

    Jobs are not the easiest to secure here, but in this economic period, that's to be expected. You might have read some of the threads regarding finding work difficult with a temporary/provisional visa - again, not everyone has found it difficult. It does seem clear though that employers are more likely to employ Australian citizens first, then those on permanent visas before us temps.

    I think homesickness can engulf people but most who do stick it out will find it lessens in time. Some people will be going home because they have run out of money and they will have support networks back home to get them back on their feet.

    Missing family is very hard and some days are worse than others - I had a real wobble last week and wanted to go home - but mainly I have adjusted well to life here. Those coming over here because they think it might be a land of milk and honey, need to be realistic; in many respects it is no different to anywhere else. Life is what you make it I guess and time itself has a big part to play in sorting issues out. Good luck to anyone considering coming over here.

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    Guest Thongs Rule

    Hi Steve,

     

    To make good friends takes a long time, if your friends could have stayted the distance over here then this hurdle could have been overcome. That said I only lived and worked in the UK near Stratford for a few years and I felt the quality of people within that town and area far exceeds that of even here in Norwood, the populous of Adelaide can feel a little grubby depending where you come from.

     

    Over half of my friends from university have now left Adelaide and gone to the eastern states or the UK, this is just down to limited prospects within Adelaide, and with Adelaide running with the highest unemployment in Australia it's likely more will follow out the door. I myself am now trying to get back to the Uk, I have made so much equity now in my home here I can now buy a house outright in the UK.

     

    As for work then we aussies get cast as being a bit behind the times, sometimes with good reason, but generally I think towns like Adelaide cannot support a wide range of industries, therefore it specialises in Defence / Automotive and light manufacturing. If your from another industry you may very well find working conditions very different as it's not something adelaidians do well, and even in these industries investment isn't always at the top of agenda so it can appear run down.

     

    As for your mate who was a copper, well there are still a core percentage of the Australian population who ignore their ancestry and despise the British, some with good reasons, some with bad, it is likely if you friend worked near one of these people his / her life could have been made intolerable. I'm sure though there are equally racist people in the UK towards foreigners so it shouldn't come as any suprise they exist here also.

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    Guest Guest75
    If you come here and expect milk and honey straight off then you are going to fail, sorry thats the way it is. If you are not flexable and willing to take a few steps back then you will fail, if you expect everything the same as the Uk but better then failure agian. It is not the UK, the wages and work conditions are sometimes crap. And your friends and family are not here, so think hard about wether or not you can live without them BEFORE you start the process.

    So many people fall down at the first hard knock Australia gives them because they were expecting milk and honey! But more get up dust themselves down and give it another go.

    I dont consider 5 months is long enough to give anything a proper try!

     

    So true Sarah - this place is not an instant fix.

     

    It does take a couple of years to establish here fully.

     

    I remember your fella was not settled at first:D

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    Milk and Honey? Are you having a laff???????

    Like has been said, you aint got nowhere if you think it is!

    The difference her, you work to LIVE, not the other way round.

    People are friendly..................if you are; and best of all you gotta be honest about it all.

     

    No tambourines here, but i am loving the place.

    GOD BLESS AUSTRALIA!!!

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    The Land of Milk and Honey eh!Nay,Nay and Thrice Nay.Its just as hard to come here and find a good job as it is for an Aussie to come to Britain and find a nice little number,so lets not get false illusions.Before we came here 6 months ago everyone said to us there were plenty of jobs,and the Aussies are so laid back their work ethic borders on laziness,Ha,what a laugh on both counts.From those ive seen and met,Aussies are fine,hardworking people,who are up at the crack of dawn,Unlike many i know back home.The other thing ive noticed is that its very hard to find a job that will pay well,as a migrant you will really have to prove your worth in Adelaide,it will not land on your lap easy peasy,but ive allways believed you get nowt for nowt anyway,perhaps not the train of thought with some back home.The whole atomosphere here is better than that in the UK,and the people in Adelaide are one hell of a lot less cynical and a whole lot more friendly than a lot of people in the UK,though i also appreciate that there is good and bad everywhere!Im proud to be British and happy to be in Australia.Grouch over,and out.

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    Guest Thongs Rule
    What job are you coming over to do ???

    I woud look to work within Trancso or one of their sub-contractors for Gas distribution.

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    Guest caoimhe

    No, No and No. Coming here has put us financially back at least 10 years. My O/H just got a job for wages he was on 5 years ago at home but he spent years building up his reputation in the UK so it will take time to establish that here obviously. I have met some great friends in the last 3 months but do they compare to my friends at home that I have had for 20-30 years....off course they don't but what do you expect. It took me 20-30 years to get to that point were I could talk to them about anything so hardly going to find that in a few months, but I have meet people here who have gone so much out of their way to help us settle.

    When I see my kids playing at the beach, park, swimming pools and all the other things that we have been able to do together as a family for very little or no money I know that not matter how much of a struggle we may find it here for the next few years I will stick it out for their sakes. If you get this far be prepared to give it your all or don't bother coming. Its VERY hard...Its not the UK..but thats why we came....to leave the UK. If you are looking for the UK with great weather then you will not find it anywhere in the world.They speak English here and drive on the same side of the road but that's it.

    Think long and hard and remember its an expensive mistake to make if you don't like it. My O/H had never been here before and came with NO expectations at all and loves it, I think that's the best attitude to have ;)

    BTW I have a friend here who is English and now in the Australian police and has not come across any problems...

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    Guest sarahsmartiepants
    No, No and No. Coming here has put us financially back at least 10 years. My O/H just got a job for wages he was on 5 years ago at home but he spent years building up his reputation in the UK so it will take time to establish that here obviously. I have met some great friends in the last 3 months but do they compare to my friends at home that I have had for 20-30 years....off course they don't but what do you expect. It took me 20-30 years to get to that point were I could talk to them about anything so hardly going to find that in a few months, but I have meet people here who have gone so much out of their way to help us settle.

    When I see my kids playing at the beach, park, swimming pools and all the other things that we have been able to do together as a family for very little or no money I know that not matter how much of a struggle we may find it here for the next few years I will stick it out for their sakes. If you get this far be prepared to give it your all or don't bother coming. Its VERY hard...Its not the UK..but thats why we came....to leave the UK. If you are looking for the UK with great weather then you will not find it anywhere in the world.They speak English here and drive on the same side of the road but that's it.

    Think long and hard and remember its an expensive mistake to make if you don't like it. My O/H had never been here before and came with NO expectations at all and loves it, I think that's the best attitude to have ;)

    BTW I have a friend here who is English and now in the Australian police and has not come across any problems...

    Well said Caoimhe:notworthy:

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    Guest njacinthebox
    Hi everyone.

    Just got news that some friends of ours are coming back from Adelaide.

    They only went in Augast .They said it was a great place but just missed the UK and family and friends too much.Found it hard to meet good friends again, the ones you can talk about anything about. The people they met where brilliant but not mates as we know them. The work was'nt up to much either. She had to get wot was on offer and got all the rubbish hours. It was'nt all plain sailing and wot it was all cracked up to be.

     

    Also gas fitter mate went to Brisbane and he came back last year cos couldnt find any good paid jobs.

    Also police friend went two years ago and he has stuck it out but said he hated the work cos looked down on by the Ozzy cops. Poo hours etc

    He has now left the police and gone Private Investigator.

     

     

    Anybody know anybody else who has come back. And Why.'

     

    Good luck every body

     

    The best thing about coming to Adelaide for us is that it has made us realise how good we had it in the UK. We're going back and cant wait.

    I must say though that the whole stepping back financially and workwise we have only experienced here in Adelaide, never had anything like that in Perth or Sydney. So if you have the choice of places to go its worth considering because they are all very different in that respect.:wideeyed:

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    Guest Suziep

    What I don't understand is why Australia is rated the same as the UK when it is totally different??? Surely survival is adapting to the environment you choose to be in???

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    Guest Trakki

    It is certainly not easy but as everyone has said you have to give it your all. We have been here 5 months and are lucky as I have a good job with a good wage however this coming year will be hard as I ampregnant and don't get maternity pay so will be on leave without pay which means that Pete has to get a job but we know that he will only at best earn half of what I do now so it will be hard but we are certainly not going to give in, it is worth it for the family life we have now. The Australia school system has been the making of our 8 year old, he wouldn't even speak to his teacher in the UK, here he stands up infront of the class to do show and tell, he is a happier boy.

     

    You have to work at it and of course it takes time to make friendships and build the close bonds you may have had.

     

    We love it here but even if we didn't we would not be heading back now we would stick it out to at least get citizenship so that if the children decided to come out one day they could without having to worry about visas.

     

    Basically you get out of it what you put in.

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    Guest Nick11

    It takes you a life time to achieve what you have in the uk - you can't expect to have it here in oz instantly.

    Realistically it's gonna take a long long time.

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    I'd like to echo the previous posts...

     

    Australia is a bloody long way away - grab yourself a globe and have a good look before you even think about filling in the paperwork; if the distance from friends and family will be a problem then don't come, simple as that.

     

    I've met some fantastic people since I arrived and am sure I will meet plenty more but that bond you're talking about simply isn't there at the start - it takes time to build a rapport with new people, regardless of how many barbies you go to.

     

    You also cannot turn up expecting to have work offered to you; as Stephen and Jacqui (and many others) have found out, you'll probably find yourself almost starting again in your career but hard work and a positive outlook will reap rewards over here.

     

    Justin.

     

    p.s. Don't forget to bring your sense of humour 8-)

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    We came over with the intention of giving ourselves 2 years to settle and if we did not like it, then to view it as an amazing experience and working holiday and go back to the UK again.

    We would have lost out financially, but we could gain so much - an outdoor lifestyle more family orientated than in the UK and I truly worry about my grandchildren and what life would be like for them in 20 yrs time in the UK.

    We have been here almost 6 months and the only time I have felt down is when thinking of my daughter and her family in the UK - but she will be here (to stay) on the 16th March so we are all very excited! Things are falling into place for us.

    We have been lucky in that our jobs pay approx the same as in the UK but brought virtually no money with us so was a struggle financially to start with, but we expected this so did not fall out over it!

    We have done and seen things we would never have done in the UK and have been thoroughly enjoying ourselves despite having to work full time for 2 yrs to fulfill visa conditions (was part time) and at the moment we DEFINITELY want to stay!

    Just be realistic about your expectations and you will be fine

    Catherine

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    Guest ReadyPenny

    When I talk to my friends and family about Australia they all tend to think that it is all beaches and BBQs. I have to bring them back down to earth and explain that we still have to do the same things as here

     

    work hard

    pay the bills

    do the housework

    washing and ironing

    grocery shopping

     

    etc etc. So although the spare time may be used for beaches and BBQs the necessities still need to be done first. And of course this pegs on actually getting a job first, which we are very fortunate to already have, sorting out a rental etc. People who have never been, and are not going like my family, think that I will be having a wonderful relaxing life doing nothing but swim in the pool and drink wine all day over - all I can say is I WISH!!!!!!!!!

     

    I think, as a family, that on the whole we are prepared for the sacrificies and are realistic with our expectations. However, as recent weeks have shown, my plans for dealing with my emotions did not pan out, therefore I am fully expecting to find all my prep work to be useless and feel that we may have to paddle upstream for a while. Will give us something to concentrate on when the homesickness sets in!!

     

    Mandy

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    Guest graandjac
    What I don't understand is why Australia is rated the same as the UK when it is totally different??? Surely survival is adapting to the environment you choose to be in???

    You have hit the nail on the head big time , and its the people who can do this sooner rather than later who will settle easer, its not easy ...there WILL be tears,there WILL be problems.........but when we were sat on the beach last night at 8.30 with a beer and glass of wine, and fish and chips, kids in the sea.....lol ...............it was bloody amazing

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    Guest lastboyscout

    Milk and honey PAH :goofy:

     

    Its hard work , adapting , alcohol and BBQ`s and thats about it :biglaugh:

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    ...sat on the beach last night at 8.30 with a beer and glass of wine, and fish and chips, kids in the sea...

     

    Sounds like milk and honey to me mate! :cute:

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    Wow. Reading the comments here, I thought it was only me who had it as hard as that, but it is heartening that others have very similar experiences - the feeling of a lack of a support network, homesickness (didn't really get to me, but I do miss the people), but moreover, everything that I had to learn or know, I had to pretty much do by myself. I came here in 2000 by myself.

     

    I was a student and so I was in a different situation to most, I had to apply for PR onshore. That was difficult, then finding a job, plus the whole thing about jobs and PR hinging on my ability to graduate. Living on substantially less money than most was also difficult - with no really big income, getting ahead was also pretty much impossible, let alone 'saving' ! Course fees swallowed everything up with alarming regularity.

     

    The very real threat of one day, being asked to leave with 21 days notice, to get all your affairs in order when they already were here - cars, furniture, stuff - if I got the letter that said "application unsuccessful", which, thankfully, I never did. But it hangs over your head, and I guess that if you are an onshore applicant, you know what I mean. To have tasted something and experienced something nice, it is difficult to give that up and go back to what you previously had (e.g. when China / India / African nations eventually attain Western lifestyles, credit cards, shopping and high protein diets - watch out).

     

    A lot of people at home thought "Australia" in the same way as we watched "Home and Away" or "Neighbours" at home, you know - everyone sits on the beach all day or in the cafe, everyone lives in everyone else's house and the sun always shines. No worries mate (as if !)

     

    They never saw the other side, which is that it was b***dy hard work sometimes, and it all almost fell through several times for me - almost running out of money, almost being homeless, two car crashes - the first two threats still hover over your head now, despite having a rental and earning a wage. I guess that I never want to go back to those days.

     

    So, that's WHY I got involved in this forum. I know what it was like, and I want to be able to help people.

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    Wow. Reading the comments here, I thought it was only me who had it as hard as that, but it is heartening that others have very similar experiences - the feeling of a lack of a support network, homesickness (didn't really get to me, but I do miss the people), but moreover, everything that I had to learn or know, I had to pretty much do by myself. I came here in 2000 by myself.

     

    I was a student and so I was in a different situation to most, I had to apply for PR onshore. That was difficult, then finding a job, plus the whole thing about jobs and PR hinging on my ability to graduate. Living on substantially less money than most was also difficult - with no really big income, getting ahead was also pretty much impossible, let alone 'saving' ! Course fees swallowed everything up with alarming regularity.

     

    The very real threat of one day, being asked to leave with 21 days notice, to get all your affairs in order when they already were here - cars, furniture, stuff - if I got the letter that said "application unsuccessful", which, thankfully, I never did. But it hangs over your head, and I guess that if you are an onshore applicant, you know what I mean. To have tasted something and experienced something nice, it is difficult to give that up and go back to what you previously had (e.g. when China / India / African nations eventually attain Western lifestyles, credit cards, shopping and high protein diets - watch out).

     

    A lot of people at home thought "Australia" in the same way as we watched "Home and Away" or "Neighbours" at home, you know - everyone sits on the beach all day or in the cafe, everyone lives in everyone else's house and the sun always shines. No worries mate (as if !)

     

    They never saw the other side, which is that it was b***dy hard work sometimes, and it all almost fell through several times for me - almost running out of money, almost being homeless, two car crashes - the first two threats still hover over your head now, despite having a rental and earning a wage. I guess that I never want to go back to those days.

     

    So, that's WHY I got involved in this forum. I know what it was like, and I want to be able to help people.

     

    spot on mate. it is hard, but good, although as i'm ready to board flight 2 of 3 on my way back from my trip home to the US, i'm so not looking forward to the hard parts. that's life for the first few years though i guess. onwards and upwards...says the tired homesick traveller;)

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