Rob and Mel

Visa cut backs

    Recommended Posts

    Has anyone seen these comments?

     

     

    Skilled migrants cutback

     

    * Michelle Grattan and Peter Martin

    * March 16, 2009

     

    AUSTRALIA'S intake of skilled migrants will be slashed by 18,500 over the next three months — 14 per cent of the annual intake — in a dramatic move to protect local jobs.

     

    Less than a year after increasing the skilled migrant intake to record levels, the Rudd Government has responded to the deepening economic crisis by removing building and manufacturing trades from the list of workers Australia is seeking from overseas.

     

    Bricklayers, plumbers, welders, carpenters and metal fitters will no longer get entry. The list of critical skills is now confined mainly to the health and medical, engineering and IT professions.

     

    The cut reduces the skilled migrant intake for the 2008-09 financial year from 133,500 to 115,000.

     

    The Government had already foreshadowed a reduction in skilled migrants — who form the bulk of the immigration intake — next financial year, with details to be announced in the May budget.

     

    The decision to cut the number of skilled migrants now shows the Government's growing concern about ballooning unemployment, which in February rose from 4.8 per cent to 5.2 per cent.

     

    The official forecast of a 7 per cent unemployment rate by mid next year is certain to be revised up in the budget.

     

    The deep cut in skilled migrant numbers follows December changes that meant only migrants sponsored by an employer or in an occupation on the critical skills list could get a permanent visa. Almost half the visas granted in this category are to people already working in Australia.

     

    Immigration Minister Chris Evans promised further paring back of the critical skills list if warranted. "The Government will remove occupations from the list if demand for those skills can be satisfied by local labour."

     

    Senator Evans said the overwhelming message from business and industry "is that Australia still needs to maintain a skilled migration program but one that is more targeted so that migrant workers are meeting skills shortages and not competing with locals for jobs".

     

    There were still shortages in sectors such as health care. The measures will enable industry to continue to get the skilled professionals needed "while protecting local jobs and the wages and conditions of Australian workers", Senator Evans said.

     

    He added that the Government remained committed to a strong migration program. "Skilled migration plays a crucial role in stimulating the economy."

     

    The cuts came as Mr Swan signed an international communique agreeing to "fight all forms of protectionism and maintain open trade and investment".

     

    Finance ministers and treasurers from the Group of 20 large industrial and developing nations met in Horsham, south-west of London, to thrash out an agreement that committed them to "take whatever action is necessary until growth is restored" with the proviso that they kept their borders open.

     

    "We will try to ensure that there is no intended or unintended trade protectionism," said the meeting's chair, UK Chancellor of the Exchequer Alistair Darling, speaking to reporters after the meeting.

     

    Mr Swan told the ABC there had been little disagreement: "You didn't see that in the meeting today. It was a very encouraging outcome. I've been coming to a number of these meetings over the last six months or so and today I saw a resolve we haven't seen before."

     

    Ministers agreed to boost their contributions to the International Monetary Fund to let it help countries that can no longer get credit.

     

    The leaders of the G-20 nations including Prime Minister Kevin Rudd will continue the negotiations in London on April 2. The global financial crisis will dominate Mr Rudd's first face-to-face meeting with US President Barack Obama next week.

     

    Mr Obama yesterday singled out Australia as a country taking appropriate action in the face of the global economic crisis. "Kevin Rudd has taken similar steps (to stimulate the economy) in Australia ," he said .

     

    Hope it dont affect those of us that have lodged a long time ago!

     

    Rob and Mel

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Here's the same article in this mornings Advertiser, with a relevant part for SA

    http://www.news.com.au/adelaidenow/story/0,22606,25191742-5006301,00.html

     

    I wouldn't have thought that those who have already lodged an application would be affected, but to be honest the jobs market here is really tough right now, and getting worse with people being laid off and businesses closing, and to add to all that it's piddling down today too.

     

    I just wish the SA government would consider abandoning it's plans to bring in 50,000 Filipino migrants entirely. I can't see the need at all.

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest sandar1

    Has your visa been approved if so it shouldn't effect you coming, if not it probably will. Work is however like everywhere else in the world harder to find at the moment, but there is a lot of new construction going on I hear. What sort of work are you looking for?

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Has your visa been approved if so it shouldn't effect you coming, if not it probably will. Work is however like everywhere else in the world harder to find at the moment, but there is a lot of new construction going on I hear. What sort of work are you looking for?

     

     

    Hate to say it but there WAS a lot of new commercial/large scale construction going on, but a lot of projects have been suspended or cancelled (including a huge new apartment block in the city which was 42% pre sold and now been cancelled), and some larger commercial construction firms have gone under - last week it was Alpine who were building the Newport Quays development at Port Adelaide.

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest Tina

    this wasn't good news to wake up to this morning. Sunrise said, it will include anyone who is not on a permanent visa and will affect anyone in the country and outside it.

     

    anyone know a good migration agent in Australia, i may need to see what our options are before we get kicked out.

     

    i think the immigration line will be busy today :sad:

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    OK, i have just started the process of changing from a 457 to PR, as regional sponsored..................having secured a contract of AT LEAST 3 years work by the company; assuming i stay with them!

    The agent reckons i have a good chance of approval.

     

    Even so, i aint counting any chickens; i am just getting on with the 2 years, enjoying this opportunity, despite the darn rain!

     

    I respect the govt for taking this stand, lord knows the british govt could have protected jobs in the uk and chose not to have the cojones. Aus havent entirely closed the borders, they have just decided to ensure their own trades are afforded some hope in these dark times.

     

    So c'mon guys, keep ya chin's up; even on a temp visa, 2 years is a long time, and thing might change in our favour!!!!!

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Create an account or sign in to comment

    You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

    Create an account

    Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

    Register a new account

    Sign in

    Already have an account? Sign in here.

    Sign In Now