Guest rowy

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    Guest rowy

    Has anyone taken their Parents with them to Oz. Have read about Parent Visas. Has anyone got any experience. My parents are retired and would be living with us if they came. Penny

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    Guest CHORLEY GIRL

    Hi Penny,

     

    I would have liked my mum to come over, however got told that it depends on how many siblings there are going to be living out there. For example step brothers/sisters count. I have a few step brothers and sisters and because i am the only one living out there well if i get in, it wouldn't be possible as half of your children have to be living out there for the parent to be eligible.

     

    It all depends on your family circumstances as my mum and dad are divorced and my mum has re married. There might be another way she could get in with her husband i'm not sure there are so many Visas. Are you an only child or do you have any brothers and sisters?

     

    Jo x

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    Guest CHORLEY GIRL

    Hi Penny

     

    sorry forgot, a site to have a look on www.immi.gov.au/migrants/families

     

    There is a Balance of Family Test you can do which might give you more of an idea.

     

    If you need any info on families and migration great person to PM and im sure wouldn't mind is gollywobbler. Hope this helps a bit, sorry couldn't be of more use.

     

    Cheers Jo:)

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    Guest The Pickles

    Hi Penny

     

    We're hoping that my parents can join us at some point too, they are also both retired. I'm lucky that I'm an only child so I don't need to worry about the Balance of Family Test - parents must either have a greater or equal number of children permanently in Australia than outside; have a greater number of children permanently in Australia than in any other single country.

     

    There are two main types of Parent visas: Standard Parent Visas which apparently there is a long queue for (my agent says 10 plus years) or the Contributory Parent Visa - these involve paying the Australian Government large fees (currently A$32,725 per adult in 2008/09 and likely to be higher in 2009/10). They qualify for Medicare (you'd want them to for that fee) and can claim the Australian pension after 10 years... I think you can only go for the latter if you've been in Australia for 2 plus years but that might depend on which Visa you are on.

     

    Then there's Retirement Visas which again means you have to pay loads of cash...

     

    Look online or speak to your agent if you have one.

     

    We've come to realise that my parents will have to visit us on a tourist visa as often as they can which breaks my heart as they'll miss their 3 year old grandson.

     

    I wish you luck whatever option you go for!

     

    Marilyn, Glenn & Louis (age 3 almost 4)

    Arriving in Adelaide on 1 July... not long now!

     

     

     

     

    Has anyone taken their Parents with them to Oz. Have read about Parent Visas. Has anyone got any experience. My parents are retired and would be living with us if they came. Penny

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    I think I read somewhere as well that the current waiting list for Parent Visa's is about the ten year mark! They only allocate so many per year which is why there's such a long wait I think. I haven't checked for a while though so this may have been updated recently.

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    on a Retirement Visa. My brother and I both live in Aus so they passed the balance of children test. They had to have 500k as a bond, 500k as savings, a pension of approx 60k a year and completely private medical insurance. Interest is paid on the bond 6 monthly at about 5%ish. The reason we chose this Visa is because we came on a 495 but are now permanent. In October dad will be 65 and qualifies as an aged (!!) parent and will be going down this Visa route, costs about the same as the Cont parent (ie 40k ish each). Email Alan Collett from gomatilda and explain your circumstances, he is a mine of info or have a look at the immi website. There are ways, its expensive, but if you asked them they would say its worth it. Joanne

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    Has anyone taken their Parents with them to Oz. Have read about Parent Visas. Has anyone got any experience. My parents are retired and would be living with us if they came. Penny

     

    Hi Penny

     

    My widowed mother migrated to Oz on a Contributory Parent visa in 2006. It is brilliant for her. She is where she wants to be, living in a good climate with my sister, her husband and their two sons. Mum absolutely dotes on the boys, who are her only grandchildren.

     

    I know loads of other Parents who have migrated in the same way and very, very few regret it later.

     

    I believe that it is very well worth doing.

     

    Best wishes

     

    Gill

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    Hi the Pickles

     

    There are two main types of Parent visas: Standard Parent Visas which apparently there is a long queue for (my agent says 10 plus years)

    There was a British lady who posted on Poms in Oz a few months ago. She had applied for, and just received, a non contributory Parent subclass 103 visa. She said it took about 8 years from start to finish. That tallies with the information some friends of mine were given a year ago when they went to see DIAC in Adelaide for a chew of the cud about their own possible options.

     

    They qualify for Medicare (you'd want them to for that fee) and can claim the Australian pension after 10 years..

    This applies equally to both Contributory Parents and non contributory Parents. Both groups get full Medicare from Day One. Similarly, once a Parent has had Permanent Residency in Oz for two years, s/he can nearly always claim a Commonwealth Seniors Health Card which, although it is means-tested, has a pretty high income threshold so most Parents are able to obtain it:

     

    http://www.centrelink.gov.au/internet/internet.nsf/payments/conc_cards_cshc.htm

     

    My mother is 88 and lives with my sister & family, so Mum doesn't get any of the concessions concerning utility bills, has never had a driving licence etc. However she does take a lot of pills for various routine ailments associated with her great age. At $31.30 per drug per prescription this was naffing expensive! Since she has had her CSH Card, the price is now $5.30 per item which is a heck of a lot better. (I haven't the heart to point out that we paid a shed load of money for this "concession" via the 2nd Instalment for Mum's CPV! She is very chuffed with her CSH Card so I'm letting sleeping dogs lie....) Other Parents would not need all the pills but if they have their own home plus a car then the CSH Card would help them via the discounts on those.

     

    There is another card as well called Seniors Card:

     

    http://www.seniorscard.com.au/

     

    There is no waiting period with Seniors Card. Mum was able to claim hers as soon as she went to Oz on her CPV. The actual benefits with Seniors Card vary from one State to the next. However the SA Card is said to be the most generous of them all. Mum is in Perth and the WA Card is very good too. I know several Parents and Retirees who have moved to SA and they all reckon that Seniors Card SA is excellent.

     

    http://www.dfc.sa.gov.au/pub/default.aspx?tabid=407

     

    From a quick look, the concessions are pretty similar to the WA Card. For example, Seniors Card WA offers 25% off Council rates, water rates and car tax. Parents with Seniors Cards can claim those straightaway. 2 years later when they get their Commonwealth Seniors Card, the CSH Card gives another 25% off the same things, making a saving of 50% in total. It is WELL worth investigating Seniors Card very closely because Seniors Card is not means tested and it is surprising how much help it gives, unlike the pathetic concessions for pensioners in the UK.

     

    I think you can only go for the latter if you've been in Australia for 2 plus years but that might depend on which Visa you are on.

    The child in Australia (or one of the children in Australia) must sponsor the application for the Parent or Contributory Parent visa. To be eligible to act as the sponsor the relevant child must be "a settled Permanent Resident of Australia."

     

    The "permanent resident" bit is straightforward. The question of what constitutes "settled" can be more fiddly. Whether or not somebody's lifestyle in Oz has become "settled" is a question of fact. It does not depend on how much time has elapsed. Please see the two MRT cases below (ignore the legal boilerplate - just focus on the evidence that the sponsors put forward to demonstrate that their lives had become fully "settled" by the time the Parents' visa applications were lodged.

     

    http://www.austlii.edu.au/cgi-bin/sinodisp/au/cases/cth/MRTA/2004/7298.html

     

    Mrs Sampson had only spent about 8 months in Oz in total at the time of the application. I do think she could have come up with a better argument than that she needed to get her parents to Oz in a hurry so that they could act as childminders and general skivvies! However the Tribunal agreed that the Sponsor had established a fully "settled" lifestyle after much less than 2 years in Oz.

     

    http://www.austlii.edu.au/cgi-bin/sinodisp/au/cases/cth/MRTA/2007/500.html

     

    Mrs & Mrs Badcock's daughter had only been living in Oz for 6 months when she applied to sponsor her Parents. Again, the Tribunal agreed that she was thoroughly well settled in Australia by then.

     

    The main thing with early applications is to present the evidence to prove that the sponsor is properly settled up front with the visa and sponsorship applications. The checklist for the visas does not require all the additional information but DIAC's policy is that they will consider anything that a visa applicant or a sponsor chooses to tell them. If all the evidence is presented up front voluntarily then it avoids arguments later.

     

    Also the PVC - Parent Visa Centre in Perth - operates a deliberate "open door" policy. The Manager is a heck of a nice man and he has told me himself that he would far rather that prospective applicants and their children should e-mail or phone him if they want guidance than that they should sit at home on their own, worrying and trying to guess at what the answers to their queries might be. Ask him and he will answer questions plus provide guidance and because he is responsible for thousands of Parent and Contributory Parent applications each year, he has infinitely more experience with them than anyone else on the planet.

     

    We've come to realise that my parents will have to visit us on a tourist visa as often as they can which breaks my heart as they'll miss their 3 year old grandson.

    How old are your Parents, please? When are you planning on moving to Oz? Are you aware that they may become eligible to apply for onshore Aged Parent or Contributory Aged Parent visas?

     

    http://www.immi.gov.au/migrants/family/parent-inside.htm

     

    One of the Parents has to be old enough to count as "aged."

     

    http://www.immi.gov.au/migrants/family/aged/804/eligibility-applicant.htm

     

    If relevant, you know your Mum's date of birth. I hate the Table for women but it is possible to work the thing out!

     

    If an onshore application is made for an Aged Parent or Contributory Aged Parent visa, a Bridging Visa will come into effect automatically. This enables the Parents to remain in Australia until the visa is eventually granted. The reason is because both Parents must be in Oz at the time when the application is submitted and they must both be in Oz when the visa is eventually granted. A Bridging Visa literally "bridges the time gap" between the two events.

     

    If you have any queries about the onshore visa, please sing out. It is the first thing I would consider in the situation which you describe. If they are or would be old enough to apply for an onshore visa by the time you have become 'settled', I certainly wouldn't leave my wrinklies languishing offshore if I were in your shoes.

     

    There is another way of "bridging time gaps", though. Are you aware of the subclass 676 Tourist visa, which can permit a stay of up to 12 months at a time in Australia?

     

    http://www.immi.gov.au/visitors/tourist/676/

     

    DIAC are normally very accommodating towards British parents who want to spend extended periods in Oz with their children & grandchildren so I can ASSURE you that this is nowhere near as bad as you might imagine.

     

    If it will help, please give Grandad a shout:

     

    http://www.pomsinadelaide.com/forum/member.php?u=2248

     

    Their daughter Judi runs Roo Rentals in Adelaide:

     

    http://www.roorentals.com.au/

     

    Grandad & family have become dear friends of mine. Grandad & his wife are too young for the Aged route so they applied for offshore Contributory Parent visas last year. They then went to Adelaide last September on 12 month 676 visas. They have bought a house and have settled in very well indeed. They are currently in the final stages of processing with their CPVs and anticipate making a short trip offshore to Fiji, Auckland or possibly Hong Kong for a week or so early in September 2009 so that their CPVs can be granted whilst they are outside Australia, which is the requirement with offshore visas.

     

    Auckland is pricey but there are lots of cheap flights. There are some very competitively priced all inclusive package tours to Fiji or Vanuatu. There are, however, 8 Marks & Spencer shops in Hong Kong.....! Plus there are some very cheap cruises from Sydney and the visas can be evidenced in Fiji, Vanuatu, Noumea or Auckland, depending on the ship's itinerary if the Parents feel like a few days at sea instead of exploring ashore. Lots of options.

     

    Best wishes

     

    Gill

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