Guest friends4life

In a real dilemma

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    Guest friends4life

    Hi guys,

    I am new to poms in adelaide and would like to start by saying hi to you all.

    Ok where do i start! We are in a real dilemma but also on a complete high as we received our grant for SA a week ago.

    Now it has finally happened our dilemma is where do we start.

    We have never been to South Australia but heard so many fantastic things which will change our children and our lives completely.

    Our first dilemma is should we just pack up send all our furniture etc. on and our little dog or should we come out for a month and find good areas to rent with good schools.

    Also how would we know a good area from a bad one and which are good schools.

    I have a 13 year old daughter and a 10 year old son and they are our main priority to get them settled.

    Can anyone also recommend a site where we can find short term rentals and information on schools.

    My final question (sorry) is my daughter is 14 in August which school year will she be in and when do they take their SACEs and my 10 year old son will be 11 in December and which school year will he be in.

    I appreciate any advice you have and thank you very much for your time in answering my questions.

    Thanks Again.

    Friends4Life

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    Guest rich

    Just on your first dilemma - if you can stretch to it, I think it is definitely worth a visit to see if it is what you visualise. My wife and I have been 3 times (2 on hols, 1 recce) and particularly on the third time (but a little 2nd time) were able to make a formal decision. That way you can ascertain areas to live. We spent a week driving about but it was very worthwhile, best thing we did really. Hope this helps in some small way!

     

    Rich

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    Your daughter would go into yr9 next year in January . Your son would go into yr 6 next year.

    High school starts at yr 8. SACE will now start with a few components at yr10 but the main subjects are taken at yr11 and 12, with Yr 12 being scored for uni entry.

     

    If you want public schools then you can find the individual school websites here www.dete.sa.gov.au for both primary and secondary.

     

    Research areas in Adelaide you think you might want to live in and then check out the schools in the area. High schools are zoned with popular ones very tightly zoned. Schools don't have published league tables or reports but you can read the context statement on the schools website which gives you info about the school's population, what facilities there are, extra curricular items and the kids background, ie non english speaking, aboriginal, school card.... BUT then you need to visit your short listed schools to see which ones grab you as being right for your kids.

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    Hi

    If you can manage a recce trip before you move for good, that is the ideal way to do it - but many don't (we didn't!) so if it's going to work out incredibly expensive then it's not absolutely essential.

    I always recommend people to rent short term somewhere fairly centrally, unless you know already where you will be working. Several people on here have short term furnished properties they rent out, such as Tyke (http://www.auseelife.com.au/) who posts on here regularly) or you can look on somewhere like http://www.realestate.com.au and select the "holidays" tab.

    Personally I would bring as much furniture etc with you as you can - when you first arrive there are zillions of things to get organised, such as a longer term rental, schools, jobs etc, and at least if you have some furniture coming over, you don't have to refurnish a whole house from scratch at the same time. If you have anything old and nearing replacement though, then obviously, now's your chance to do it when you arrive!

    Take your time selecting a place to live, there is no hurry to geet the kids into school, so sort out a hire car (Brian at Aussie Car Rentals is a good guy http://www.aussiecarrentals.com.au/) and prepare yourself for several days of driving and driving, visiting schools, checking out houses, looking at the local areas.

    My kids are 14 and 12 and have been here with us for five years, they have settled really well and I am convinced they have far better opportunities and standard of schooling than we would have had in the UK.

    You are at the start of a great adventure, and your kids are probably at a great age to benefit from it! If you know where you will be working, or where the employers in your field are located, that's a good place to start! After that, well the whole of Adelaide is your oyster!!

    Diane

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    Guest taylored

    we came over 3 weeks ago and have sent a lot of stuff over from the uk costs about £3000 for groupage but could you furnish a house for that much,now for the down side it takes 3 months to arrive.personnally i wouldn't want to do the 24 hr flight more than i have to.we found somewhere to rent within a week but you have to get in before the open day. my son is 11 and he has gone into year 6 had a bad first day but by friday was running into school and coming out smiling think it affects us more than them.hope this helps you ian , tonia

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    Guest friends4life
    Your daughter would go into yr9 next year in January . Your son would go into yr 6 next year.

    High school starts at yr 8. SACE will now start with a few components at yr10 but the main subjects are taken at yr11 and 12, with Yr 12 being scored for uni entry.

     

    If you want public schools then you can find the individual school websites here www.dete.sa.gov.au for both primary and secondary.

     

    Research areas in Adelaide you think you might want to live in and then check out the schools in the area. High schools are zoned with popular ones very tightly zoned. Schools don't have published league tables or reports but you can read the context statement on the schools website which gives you info about the school's population, what facilities there are, extra curricular items and the kids background, ie non english speaking, aboriginal, school card.... BUT then you need to visit your short listed schools to see which ones grab you as being right for your kids.

     

    Hi,

    Thank you very much for all of your useful information. We will certainly be looking at alot of schools and I will do a short list for both primary and secondary.

    If you could let me know how many SACE's a child has to take, i would be greatful and also my daughter loves languages how many are compulsory (if any).

    I look forward to hearing from you.

    Thanks Again

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    In yr 11, English is compulsory and to get the SACE unit a grade of C or higher is necessary. More than one other language can be taken in yr 11 and 12. Languages are not compulsory.

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    Guest friends4life
    In yr 11, English is compulsory and to get the SACE unit a grade of C or higher is necessary. More than one other language can be taken in yr 11 and 12. Languages are not compulsory.

     

    Aha I see, so correct me if i am wrong but a child can take as many SACE's as he/she requires but english is compulsory?

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    Guest friends4life
    Hi

    If you can manage a recce trip before you move for good, that is the ideal way to do it - but many don't (we didn't!) so if it's going to work out incredibly expensive then it's not absolutely essential.

    I always recommend people to rent short term somewhere fairly centrally, unless you know already where you will be working. Several people on here have short term furnished properties they rent out, such as Tyke (http://www.auseelife.com.au/) who posts on here regularly) or you can look on somewhere like www.realestate.com.au and select the "holidays" tab.

    Personally I would bring as much furniture etc with you as you can - when you first arrive there are zillions of things to get organised, such as a longer term rental, schools, jobs etc, and at least if you have some furniture coming over, you don't have to refurnish a whole house from scratch at the same time. If you have anything old and nearing replacement though, then obviously, now's your chance to do it when you arrive!

    Take your time selecting a place to live, there is no hurry to geet the kids into school, so sort out a hire car (Brian at Aussie Car Rentals is a good guy http://www.aussiecarrentals.com.au/) and prepare yourself for several days of driving and driving, visiting schools, checking out houses, looking at the local areas.

    My kids are 14 and 12 and have been here with us for five years, they have settled really well and I am convinced they have far better opportunities and standard of schooling than we would have had in the UK.

    You are at the start of a great adventure, and your kids are probably at a great age to benefit from it! If you know where you will be working, or where the employers in your field are located, that's a good place to start! After that, well the whole of Adelaide is your oyster!!

    Diane

     

    Hi Diane,

    Thank You so much for the useful information you have given me, i can't thank you enough as this will help us out tremendously.

    Fortunately we do not have to live in specific areas for jobs so we are really looking forward to looking at Adelaide and surrounding areas. My two children are really looking forward to the move (but have been warned by my daughter not to live somewhere where she could wake up with snakes or spiders in her bed!) but we cannot wait to have a better quality and more of an outdoor life style too. I have also made a note of Brian and his website for car rental to get us started.

    We are probably looking to come out fairly soon but need to tie up a few loose ends here first.

    Do you know anything about shipping as there are a few things that I would like to buy before we come out and was told that everything we own has to be at least a year old. Are they that thorough when checking our belongings or do we need receipts for absolutely everything? Also anything that you can suggest that would be cheaper to buy from the UK that is expensive in Australia, I would be really greatful.

    Anyway thanks again for all of your advice, really appreciate it.

    Sam (Friends4Life)

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    English is not compulsory in yr 12. The only compulsory subject in yr 12 will be the ELP (i think that is what they are going to call it). It is an extended learning experience package in which the student explores and extends an area of interest.

     

    Two new compulsory subjects — Personal Learning Plan at Stage 1 and Research Project at Stage 2 — have been introduced as part of the new certificate. Students will have to achieve a C grade or better in these subjects to successfully complete the SACE.

    Australian Studies will not be a compulsory subject of the new SACE.

    Students will need to achieve the compulsory literacy and numeracy requirements of the SACE. They will need to achieve a C grade or better in a range of English and mathematics subjects or courses at Stage 1 to complete their SACE.

    Every Stage 2 subject will have 30% external assessment, which means an expert from outside the school will assess a student’s work; 70% of the subject’s assessment will be made by schools and these results will be checked by an expert from outside the school.

    Both Stage 1 and Stage 2 subjects will be graded from A to E.

    All students will be expected to gain knowledge, skills, and attributes in the areas of communication, citizenship, personal development, work, and learning.

    Students will earn credits for their studies, and need to earn 200 credits to successfully complete the new SACE. Ten credits equates to one semester or six months of study. This is a change from fixed semester-length subjects under the current SACE, and is designed to open up opportunities for programs and courses that better meet the needs of today’s students.

     

    at school after completing Year 10.

      <LI class=bdv11-sp16px>You can mix part-time work and part-time study at school or TAFE. <LI class=bdv11-sp16px>You can complete a full-time apprenticeship. <LI class=bdv11-sp16px>You may find a full-time job with an employer who arranges training that meets the requirements of the new SACE.
    • If you leave school before completing the SACE, you can return later to complete it without losing the credits you’ve already earned.

    9. Can I get recognition for things I do outside of school?

    Yes, many forms of education and training — provided they meet the SACE Board’s standards — can be credited to your SACE.

    The new SACE recognises learning in and beyond the classroom, including:

      <LI class=bdv11-sp16px>TAFE and other Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses <LI class=bdv11-sp16px>university studies and courses from interstate and overseas <LI class=bdv11-sp16px>courses undertaken online or through other distance education technologies <LI class=bdv11-sp16px>community learning, such as Country Fire Service training or the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award
    • work experience and other roles such as being a caregiver or participating in a community service organisation.

    A list of VET and community learning options that the SACE Board is considering for recognition in the new SACE is included in the booklet, The new SACE — Information for Year 10 students, which will be available from your school and on the SACE Board website from February 2009.

     

    10. What if I want to leave school?

    School is not for everyone and that is why the new SACE can be tailored to suit your needs and interests.

    For example, many students prefer hands-on learning or work outside of the classroom, so the new SACE gives you credit for a wide range of activities including:

      <LI class=bdv11-sp16px>learning a trade <LI class=bdv11-sp16px>TAFE and other vocational courses <LI class=bdv11-sp16px>community service (such as volunteering for a community organisation or completing a course like the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award)
    • distance education courses.

    Research shows that gaining a senior secondary certificate significantly increases your chances of a successful life and career.

    From 2009, you will be required to be in full-time education or training until you turn 17 or achieve a qualification, whichever is the sooner.

    For more information about this, visit the website of Care and Education Legislation Reform. Schools will also be able to provide more information about this process.

     

    11. I’m interested in an apprenticeship. Why should I bother with the SACE?

    Your apprenticeship can count towards your SACE.

    This means that you can gain on-the-job skills while also working towards a highly regarded qualification, which shows you have the skills and knowledge that are desirable to employers.

    You need strong literacy and numeracy skills to cope with the high demands of modern trade training, and the new SACE will help you meet these important requirements.

     

    12. How do I complete the new SACE? What subjects do I do?

    To complete the new SACE, students will have to earn 200 credits.

    At Stage 1, students will need to earn at least 40 credits from the following compulsory elements:

    • Personal Learning Plan — 10 credits
    • literacy — at least 20 credits from a range of English, literacy, or equivalent subjects and courses
    • numeracy — at least 10 credits from a range of mathematics, numeracy, or equivalent subjects and courses.
    • 53. What is the SACE Board of South Australia?

    The SACE Board of South Australia has replaced the Senior Secondary Assessment Board of SA (SSABSA). It is an authority of the South Australian Government.

    The SACE Board sets the curriculum for Year 11 and Year 12, and is responsible for the assessment of student achievement.

    The SACE Board will issue the South Australian Certificate of Education (SACE) to all students successfully completing the certificate’s requirements.

     

    54. How do I find out more?

    More details of subjects and courses in the new SACE are included in the booklet,
    The new SACE — Information for Year 10 students
    , which will be available from your school and on the SACE board website from February 2009.

    Check the SACE Board website
    ‘New SACE information’
    web page regularly for up-to-date information about the new SACE.

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    At Stage 2, students must complete at least 70 credits from the following compulsory elements:

    • Research Project — 10 credits
    • other Stage 2 subjects and courses — at least 60 credits.

    Students must achieve an A, B, C or equivalent in these compulsory elements to successfully complete the SACE.

    Students must also gain at least another 90 credits by completing additional subjects or courses at either Stage 1 or Stage 2. Many students do more than the minimum number of Stage 2 subjects.

     

    13. What is a credit?

    Ten credits are equivalent to one semester or six months study in a particular subject or course.

     

    14. How many subjects will I need to study in Year 12?

    You are required to study three full-year Stage 2 subjects, or equivalent, as well as the Research Project. If you are planning to go on to higher education, you will need to study more than this to maximise your options.

     

    15. Will the choice of subjects change?

    Most of the subjects that are available in the current SACE will still be available in the new SACE. There may be some minor changes to subject content because of the requirements of the new SACE, such as the A to E grading system and external assessment.

    Two new compulsory subjects will be introduced — Personal Learning Plan at Stage 1, and Research Project at Stage 2. Schools will also be able to tailor subjects — based on models set by the SACE Board — to meet the needs of the local community.

    A list of subjects is included in the booklet, The new SACE — Information for Year 10 students, which will be available from your school and on the from February 2009.

     

    16. What is the Personal Learning Plan?

    This is a new, compulsory subject at Stage 1 normally undertaken by Year 10 students. Students must achieve a C grade or better to successfully complete the subject and earn 10 credits towards their SACE.

    This subject allows you to explore your strengths, abilities, and skills, and get an idea of what you want to do in the future. You will be able to plan your SACE studies to suit your interests. And you will be able to change your plan if your interest and studies take you in a different direction.

    The Personal Learning Plan is all about thinking seriously about your future, and planning for that future. It will give a sense of purpose to your Year 11 and 12 studies.

     

    17. What are the literacy and numeracy requirements of the new SACE?

    The new SACE has compulsory literacy and numeracy requirements at Stage 1, beginning in 2010. The requirements are that students earn:

    • 20 credits from a range of English, literacy, or equivalent Board-accredited subjects or Board-recognised courses
    • 10 credits from a range of mathematics, numeracy, or equivalent Board-accredited subjects or Board-recognised courses.

    Satisfactory completion of Stage 1 literacy and numeracy requirements will be based on benchmarks approved by the SACE Board.

    To meet the literacy and numeracy requirements and gain the SACE, students must achieve a C grade or better in Stage 1 Board-accredited subjects, and/or satisfactory completion of Board-recognised courses in English and mathematics.

    24. What is the Research Project?

    This is a compulsory Stage 2 subject (formerly known as the Extended Learning Initiative) worth 10 credits towards the SACE, and students must achieve a C grade or better to successfully complete this subject.

    The Research Project will give you a chance to explore in depth a particular idea, subject, or personal interest, thus equipping you with valuable research and presentation skills.

    Like other Stage 2 subjects, 70% of a student’s work in this subject will be assessed by the school and 30% will be assessed by an expert from outside the school.

    This subject will be piloted in schools in 2009. It will be officially introduced with other Stage 2 new SACE subjects in 2011.

     

    25. How will the new SACE be assessed?

    Students will receive an A to E grade showing their level of achievement in every Stage 1 and Stage 2 subject. Schools will assess subjects in Stage 1.

    In Stage 2, every subject has 30% external assessment, which means a qualified expert from outside the school will assess 30% of a student’s work. This work can be completed in a variety of ways, depending on the subject. It could involve written or oral examinations, practical performances, presentations, or research work.

    Schools will assess 70% of a student’s work in each Stage 2 subject. These marks will be double-checked by an expert from outside the school.

     

    26. How do I know I will be fairly assessed?

    There are mechanisms built into every SACE subject to ensure all schools throughout the State mark to the same standard.

    Subject experts from outside your school will check the school-assessed elements of Stage 2 subjects to make sure an A grade at one school is also an A grade at another school.

     

    27. How is the requirement to award an A to E grade different to the current SACE?

    Under the new SACE, students will receive an A to E grade for Stage 1 subjects (generally at Year 11) and Stage 2 subjects (generally at Year 12).

    Currently, A to E grades are only awarded for Stage 2 subjects.

     

    28. Do I have to sit examinations?

    There are no external examinations at Stage 1 of the new SACE.

    At Stage 2, an expert from outside the school will assess 30% of a student’s work in every subject. This is called external assessment. Work that is externally assessed may be in the form of an oral or written exam, practical performance, presentation, or research work.

     

     

    35. How will the new SACE help students become independent learners?

    The two compulsory elements of the new SACE — the Personal Learning Plan and the Research Project — will help students to develop

    38. How will the tertiary entrance rank (TER) and the TAFE Score be calculated in the new SACE?

    Universities determine the policies for entry into university, including how the TER is calculated.

    TAFE SA recognises the SACE as meeting the entry requirements for most of its courses. It also considers a variety of other qualifications and experiences in its entry and selection processes.

    Full details of university and TAFE entry requirements for 2012 onwards will be provided in the tertiary entrance booklet to be published by the South Australian Tertiary Admissions Centre and distributed to schools in July 2009.

     

    39. Is the Research Project required before a tertiary entrance rank (TER) is calculated?

    Yes — a TER is only calculated when a student has completed the SACE and the Research Project is a requirement for completion of the new SACE.

     

    41. Will all subjects in the new SACE count equally towards university entry?

    A task group is currently working through a number of issues relating to the Tertiary Entrance Rank (TER) arrangements for 2012 and beyond.

    Full details of university and TAFE entry requirements for 2012 onwards will be provided in the tertiary entrance booklet to be published by the South Australian Tertiary Admissions Centre and distributed to schools in July 2009.

    STUDENTS TRANSFERRING FROM INTERSTATE OR OVERSEAS

    50. I’m transferring from interstate or overseas into Year 12. Can I get status for my previous studies?

    Yes — the SACE Board will grant status for equivalent learning in recognised jurisdictions.

     

    51. Will students who come from interstate or overseas for Stage 2 need to complete a Personal Learning Plan?

    The SACE Board will grant status for equivalent learning that has occurred in recognised jurisdictions. The Board is currently considering whether interstate and overseas students will be required to undertake the Personal Learning Plan.

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