Guest Jenny123

Are things really that bad!!

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    Guest Jenny123

    I have been studying this and a few other aussie forums for many months and now I am in a state of total "don't know what to do". Most of what I have read tells stories of people struggling to find jobs having been in Adelaide for anything from 2 to 18 months.

     

    We have our house up for sale and will be over as soon as we can. My worries are now that by the time we arrive, my husband will be 47 years old (I am 43) and we are now thinking that he is going to struggle to find work because of this. We are not coming over on skilled visas - he is a kiwi - so family visa. At present he works in the car industry (plastic moulding). Me, I would be very happy with a little part time job - eg receptionist at a gym or sweeper upper at a hairdressers - I'm not wanting an IT or medical job, so are these types of smaller jobs around and are we likely to find that companies would rather employ younger people as they do here because its cheaper.

     

    I'm sorry I seem to have waffled on a bit but I am really worried that I will be tearing my family apart (my daughter is staying here is England) without any means of earning money to make a return visit once a year. Don't get me wrong we are far from lazy people and certainly don't expect opportunities to land at our feet. And no we are not a couple who think we are going to be better off in Oz than the UK with a massive mortgage free house, we are prepared to work hard and enjoy a more outdoor lifestyle than here.

     

    Hope someone can shed some light :wubclub:

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    Guest Trakki

    At the end of the day things are what you make them, sounds like you have the right attitude. Don't know if there are jobs in your husbands field. If not then if he is willing to get any job to tide him over and give him time to look for a job that suits he should be fine. My OH had to get a job due to me falling pregnant and not getting maternity pay. He decided that he would get any old job so we had money coming in and would then have the luxury of time to find something better, as it turned out he got the first and only job he applied for and loves it. There are jobs out there and I don't think age is as much of an issue here, just a positive attitude and some flexibility.

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    Guest Sharon and Paul

    Hi Jenny, You are no different to the rest of us , Its a big move ,your hear different stories from all of us on pia!. There is a lot of people that came out here with a trade ,and doing something entirely different . Its is worth the attempt to try and change your life , than not try at all . Most people ive spoken to love it here, the job front is hard to start with , but there are jobs out there . Sorry wish I could wave the magic wand , all I can do is wish all on pia the best. Paul

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    Guest graandjac

    we are prepared to work hard and enjoy a more outdoor lifestyle than here.

     

     

    As you say above.....come with this attitude and it will give you a great head start in finding jobs and settling sooner.....good luck:)

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    Guest mayjess
    I have been studying this and a few other aussie forums for many months and now I am in a state of total "don't know what to do". Most of what I have read tells stories of people struggling to find jobs having been in Adelaide for anything from 2 to 18 months.

     

    We have our house up for sale and will be over as soon as we can. My worries are now that by the time we arrive, my husband will be 47 years old (I am 43) and we are now thinking that he is going to struggle to find work because of this. We are not coming over on skilled visas - he is a kiwi - so family visa. At present he works in the car industry (plastic moulding). Me, I would be very happy with a little part time job - eg receptionist at a gym or sweeper upper at a hairdressers - I'm not wanting an IT or medical job, so are these types of smaller jobs around and are we likely to find that companies would rather employ younger people as they do here because its cheaper.

     

    I'm sorry I seem to have waffled on a bit but I am really worried that I will be tearing my family apart (my daughter is staying here is England) without any means of earning money to make a return visit once a year. Don't get me wrong we are far from lazy people and certainly don't expect opportunities to land at our feet. And no we are not a couple who think we are going to be better off in Oz than the UK with a massive mortgage free house, we are prepared to work hard and enjoy a more outdoor lifestyle than here.

     

    Hope someone can shed some light :wubclub:

     

    Hi Jen, I definately think you have the right attitude, I wouldnt worry about your age - Im 41 & hubby 49, & we will prob only have enough money to see us through 6 mths in Adelaide, but we too our prepared to do any work at 1st, so I know we`l be ok.

     

    Just want to say Good Luck & just go for it.

     

    Mayjess

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    Guest allie

    Hi :)

     

    You def have the right attitude! In my expeience, trying to find a job as you described has been harder than i thought. Im waiting for teaching reg to om through and thought that i would walk into a part time shop job quite easily...six weeks later im still looking! In that time i have been offered three jobs - all have been on a casual basis with no guarantee of hours and all required working sat and sun every week....not what i had in mind!

     

    However, there def are jobs out there! Not sure abt your husbands trade but def jobs in retail and especially sales and promotions. Just be prepared for group interviews and lots of competition for each job.

     

    The situation may change by the time you arrive so its worth keeping an eye on job websites like seek and careerone for an idea of how many jobs are out there.

     

    Good Luck!

     

    Allie :)

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    Guest fuji70
    I have been studying this and a few other aussie forums for many months and now I am in a state of total "don't know what to do". Most of what I have read tells stories of people struggling to find jobs having been in Adelaide for anything from 2 to 18 months.

     

    We have our house up for sale and will be over as soon as we can. My worries are now that by the time we arrive, my husband will be 47 years old (I am 43) and we are now thinking that he is going to struggle to find work because of this. We are not coming over on skilled visas - he is a kiwi - so family visa. At present he works in the car industry (plastic moulding). Me, I would be very happy with a little part time job - eg receptionist at a gym or sweeper upper at a hairdressers - I'm not wanting an IT or medical job, so are these types of smaller jobs around and are we likely to find that companies would rather employ younger people as they do here because its cheaper.

     

    I'm sorry I seem to have waffled on a bit but I am really worried that I will be tearing my family apart (my daughter is staying here is England) without any means of earning money to make a return visit once a year. Don't get me wrong we are far from lazy people and certainly don't expect opportunities to land at our feet. And no we are not a couple who think we are going to be better off in Oz than the UK with a massive mortgage free house, we are prepared to work hard and enjoy a more outdoor lifestyle than here.

     

    Hope someone can shed some light :wubclub:

     

    A positive attitude will help deal with the knocks. And they will come. I know I'm one of many people here struggling to find work. ANY work. I was a teacher and community worker in the UK, all I have here is 15 hours a week leafleting at train stations and this has taken me 3 months and 40+ applications to get. It isn't enough to pay the bills. Yet others have arrived and landed a job quickly.

     

    A lot of it is luck. I don't want to sound negative, but you need to hear both sides of the story. Most of us are getting knocked back because we aren't Australian nor have we Aussie work experience. If you can afford it, I'd suggest working somewhere for free for a while so that you can at least get that experience and make contacts.

     

    Adelaide employers use pretty poor recruitment methods compared to my experiences elsewhere.:skeptical:

     

    Good luck, whatever you decide.

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    Hi Jenny,

    I can assure you ageism is not nearly as prevalent here as in the UK, you really should not worry on that issue,Aussies are only concerned with your ability to do the job advertised.Also your positive and realistic attitude will stand you in good stead,so i honestly do believe you will be OK here.Do not worry,plenty have come here with less than you and made a success for themselves.Just get on with things,as you always have,like the rest of us,things will turn out OK.ATB Sue.

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    Guest Deb17

    Some people on here will say finding a job is about putting yourself out there (if you can stand up to the many rejections, which I couldn't! ) But so much of it is WHO you know, not WHAT you know, and often blind luck comes into it. It took me over two and a half years to find work, in spite of having years of teaching experience in the UK...I now do something completely different, part-time hours and for low pay, but at least it pays for my food shopping and stopped me going completely doolally!

    Keep plugging away...once you have Aus. work experience on your resume, even if it's just temporary work, it will all count in your favour. Good Luck to everyone who is still searching for that elusive first Aussie job.

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    Guest fuji70
    Hi Jenny,

    ,Aussies are only concerned with your ability to do the job advertised.

     

    Not true. The fact that you CAN do the job seems to be way down the list, especially if you've done the job outside of Australia. Again I can only speak from my own experiences but when you get a rejection letter stating that despite your experience and qualifications matching the job criteria, they were able to shortlist people who 'more closely' matched them, you know you're in for the long haul.

     

    I know of marketing execs, PAs and people who worked in finance and PR in the UK and NONE of them have found work in their own professions here despite many years of experience.

     

    It's do-able, but it's more to do with luck than resumes.

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    Guest WoodMartin

    To anyone who is struggling to get that vital first foot into the Adelaide job market, I went to a meeting organised by Immigration SA yesterday, run by a recruitment consultant. The title was "Get that Job" and it was to help new arrivals.

     

    There was a lot of information and advice on how to structure your CV, creating a network, where to search for jobs, interview tips, work culture in Australia. Not all of it was new or earth-shattering, however I did get a few ideas.

     

    The list that was presented regarding "Networking" was:

    1. Make a list of contacts - peopel you know, people you've heard of

    2. Make a list of target organisations, identify the deicsion-makers

    3. Be prepared - plan a script before phoning or emailing, reserach their market

    4. Contact them

    5. Follow-up your contact

    6. Keep records of who, when, what has been said or discussed

    7. Attend trade conventions or seminars, conferences

    8. Join professional organisations

     

    I am waiting to get a copy of the powerpoint presentation emailed to me, and I will share it with anyone who wants a look at it. EDIT: I have the powerpoint now.

     

    Also we were recommended to join LinkedIn - sort of a professional Facebook - as a way of getting some names or getting your name known. I've just done it and it's not too hard to use. www.linkedin.com

     

    There was a definite feeling among the group (about 60 people) that it was hard to know what you need to change when you did not hear back or were not told why you'd not been successful. The advice was to call and ask for guidance.

     

    Ali

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    Guest ben&sharon

    We've experienced both sides of the coin; I got lucky and found that the job I wanted was waiting for me when I arrived - they had had trouble filling the post because of the particular skill-set needed and it was a perfect match for me. And now I'm actively recruiting for a receptionist / admin assistant, with NO preconceptions about nationality or age. I don't think there's any particular slant towards younger / cheaper employees in SA - the average age of the people I work with is well over thirty, and in fact there seems to be more desire for experience and reliability than cost-saving (older employees don't tend to hang out at the beach drinking all weekend and then phone in sick on Monday morning...........;))

     

    My husband struggled to find anything for a good few months, though, and must have applied for dozens of jobs. Eventually, after getting more and more down about it, he took a step back and realised that he'd lost his focus a bit, and then he spotted a job he fancied - service manager for a motorbike shop. So with NO experience in either the job or working for an Aussie company, he got his CV ready and drove up there. He missed the manager on the first and second occasions but he managed to have a chat with some of the other guys working there and just kept kept going back until he caught him. His enthusiasm and persistence are what paid off - and he's settled in just fine.

     

    Just wanted to let you know that it goes both ways but attitude and determination are the key factors. And some enthusiasm - you ought to see some of the CVs and cover letters I've received for this role; a lot of people just can't be bothered to work at their application.......

     

    Good luck with your decision - it's not an easy one! :)

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    Is it harder for people in profesions like IT, buisness, and finance to find jobs then say trades like plumbers, sparks, and brickies. ???.

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    There are so many factors in finding a job - timing, who you know, what you know, whether your résumé resonates with the person reading it (and even a well written one might not), your outlook or mentality, whether you say just the right thing the other person needs to hear, whether personalities 'click' at interview, level of persistence, luck etc - that it's impossible to predict how hard or easy it will be to land one, even for those who are well qualified.

     

    Not all of these things we can control; What we can do, though, is start to line up some of these factors so that the odds of success improve. Networking doesn't guarantee a job (and in my case wasn't a requirement - I didn't know anyone here when I landed this role) but it increases its likelihood. Likewise, cold calling prospective employers might not get you anywhere, but then, it just might.

     

    Luck plays a part, of course, as it does in every aspect of life, but being prepared for opportunities when they come along often gets mislabelled as luck by the less prepared but is something rather different and far more potent imho.

     

    I believe that the single biggest factor is mentality. Being positive or negative trasmits itself to every aspect of recruitment (and every aspect of life), from how the cover letter is phrased, to how a person comes across at interview, and can mean that an otherwise well qualified candidate doesn't get past the gatekeeping recruitment agency. It's not easy remaining positive if you're repeatedly being turned down, I know - I remember once being unemployed following redundancy in the UK, struggling for 10 months to find a job and coming perilously close to losing my house - but If you have the mindset that this country is backward in its recruitment methods, that you can't break into the clique, that you're superior to other candidates and that employers are idiots for not seeing this and that for some reason Australia owes you a living, then regardless of what opportunities exist, good luck, because I suspect you're going to need it!

     

    Having been involved in recruitment (as well as all the other aspects of HR) in one form or another for the last two decades, I'd say that Australia has far more similarities than differences in its practices to the UK; it's behind in some areas - cringingly so on occasion - but ahead in others. The harsh fact is, people make decisions over here in much the say way they make them in the UK, and that extends to recruitment.

     

    For all those job hunting, good luck, but more importantly, I hope you're properly prepared.

     

    Jim

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    Guest ben&sharon
    Is it harder for people in profesions like IT, buisness, and finance to find jobs then say trades like plumbers, sparks, and brickies. ???.

     

    I don't think there's an easy answer to this one. I'm in Finance and signed up with Hays; they got me an interview within a week of landing and I was offered the job the same day. And I know an IT manager that seemed to find work quite quickly, but I don't know whether these are the norm - I haven't really seen many finance folk on here recently (maybe a good sign???!)

     

    As for the trades; we know a spark and a builder who both had little trouble, but my husband was a plumber in the UK and decided to do something different here (at least at first), since it takes time to get a license and do the conversion course.....

     

    So I don't think it's harder for one group or the other, really - if you're in the first group then try the agencies and if you're in the second then for god's sake get down the pub and meet some more tradies :) . I know it takes front but Ben's made stacks of contacts that way and if he does decide to go back to plumbing then he'll have a good network set up.

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    Guest fuji70
    - but If you have the mindset that this country is backward in its recruitment methods, that you can't break into the clique, that you're superior to other candidates and that employers are idiots for not seeing this and that for some reason Australia owes you a living, then regardless of what opportunities exist, good luck, because I suspect you're going to need it!

     

    Having been involved in recruitment (as well as all the other aspects of HR) in one form or another for the last two decades, I'd say that Australia has far more similarities than differences in its practices to the UK; it's behind in some areas - cringingly so on occasion - but ahead in others. The harsh fact is, people make decisions over here in much the say way they make them in the UK, and that extends to recruitment.

     

     

    Jim

     

    You make some very salient points in your post and I'd recommend that everyone who is job hunting, or on the way over, read it.

     

    As for the quote above, from a personal viewpoint, I'd take issue with a lot of it. I think 2 relevant points that you haven't mentioned are whether job hunters usually work in private industry and also the concept of Equal Opportunities.

     

    In my 40+ job applications, I have yet to complete and equal opps form. Thus I would challenge any organisation to tell me the actual numbers of non white, non- Australian males or females that they shortlist for interview. I think such figures would surprise a few. This goes for both private industry and local government/not for profits etc. If this isn't being monitored, how does anyone challenge it?

     

    Secondly, for those people who do work in private industry, speculative resumes and letters or even 'dropping in' to an organisation may well prove successful, but it is demonstrably less so in the LA/not for profit sectors who insist (and rightly so in my opinion) that jobs are advertised and are open to all to apply.

     

    I personally do NOT feel that Australia owes me a living and I would venture to suggest, few people on this forum are that naive. What I do think is that is owes me the same chance as anyone else. I believe the Aussies call it a 'fair go' do they not? Is this not one of the founding principles of this wonderful country?

     

    I also think that local recruitment methods leave a lot to be desired and it comes as no surprise to me that Adelaide has suffered and continues to suffer a brain drain, not only from ex-pats but from 20+ South Australians in general. I love it here and I HOPE that I can stay. But if other cities are prepared to treat my application with an open mind and give me a fair go, I'll sadly have to look elsewhere.

     

    A positive attitude will help, but none of us are unfeeling lumps of wood when we're continually told that a job has been filled before the closing date, that they set someone on with 'local knowledge', that UK references will be 'difficult to contact due to the time difference' or that despite our skills and experience matching the job criteria they were able to 'recruit internally'. All of which I have been told over the last three months.

     

    After being fortunate enough to work in various countries around the world I can confidently say that this is the toughest place I've found employment wise. I love it here and I won't quit yet, but it's a daily struggle.

     

    Best of luck to everyone who's still knocking on doors. Keep going.

     

    Jo

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    Oh dear, not getting involved deeply in this one. Yes i know it can be difficult to find employment in your opreferred or chosen career path. But my mind set is if you have the balls to uproot and change every aspect of your life by moving to the other side of the world, and struggle to find work in your chosen career, why not look at taking a step sideways or even backwards? Hey some money coming in is better than no money, and you have the first vital Australian job on your CV.

     

    I have had chats with Ben (ben&sharon) above, and they seem to have the same kind of spirit and outlook as myslef, any job is better than no job, and good luck on them!!! If you restrict yourself to one job (and no before i get slaughtered on here, i am not implying anyone has) the chances of getting work dimish rapidly. And hey, you never know, you might just like the change too. A new job to go with your new lifestyle might just be the answer.

     

    Personally i have been looking for oilfield engineers for the last few months, and have not been able to find anyone who is willing to work away from home equal time off for a very good package, and i am now resorting to having to look overseas (Mainly UK and Norway) for the right people.

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    Guest fuji70

    Well, you're right. ANY job is better than none. Which is why I as a former teacher and community worker can now be found at various train stations giving out leaflets.

     

    Unfortunately most such jobs are temp ones, with odd hours and no sign of permanence. But, make hay while the sun shines I guess and just hope that someone sees how hard you're working in that silly cap and outsized off white polo shirt!!! :biglaugh:

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    Guest The Pickles
    Well, you're right. ANY job is better than none. Which is why I as a former teacher and community worker can now be found at various train stations giving out leaflets.

     

    Unfortunately most such jobs are temp ones, with odd hours and no sign of permanence. But, make hay while the sun shines I guess and just hope that someone sees how hard you're working in that silly cap and outsized off white polo shirt!!! :biglaugh:

     

    I think you look very fetching in your Adelaide Metro cap and off white polo shirt... not many people could carry that look off! :cute:

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    Guest fuji70

    off sod! I want your job Trout if you get to sit on these forums all day. You'll note that I'm advertising TVs and not completing job applications btw.

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    In my 40+ job applications, I have yet to complete an equal opps form. Thus I would challenge any organisation to tell me the actual numbers of non white, non- Australian males or females that they shortlist for interview. I think such figures would surprise a few. This goes for both private industry and local government/not for profits etc. If this isn't being monitored, how does anyone challenge it?

     

    This is the kind of political correctness I left England to escape!

     

    Everything else I agree with though - and my boss is a brilliant networker and uses LinkedIn so that's obviously a good recommendation from someone above. Lots of places take people on in short term contracts, and then when they get to know them, offer them something more permanent. The employment laws here do tend to favour employers rather than staff still. If you're the sort of go-getter who has taken the step of moving to the other side of the world, then use that determination to get into the recruitment agencies, get to know the people, get your name at the top of the list/front of mind when a new job comes in, or use whichever method (pub networking, school parent networking etc) suits you best.

     

    Good luck to everyone looking!

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    Guest badlands

    ive been in perth for 9 years befor moving here and i have the aussie work experince but ive applied for jobs on conveyor belts , baggage handlers factory , production u name it ive applied for it and out of 100 jobs i went for 4 emailed back sayin other people were better suited so how do you know any one wen u hav just arrived here people might b lucky to get a job but as others hav said no garentees and iam 50 still willing to try anything

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    Guest fuji70
    This is the kind of political correctness I left England to escape!

     

     

    What? A fair chance for everyone you mean?? Heaven forfend! Where on earth would it lead?! Jeez we'll all be banning Xmas next eh?

     

    Discrimination is something that Australia sooner or later needs to start addressing and addressing seriously.

     

    If you found out (as I have) that you hadn't been shortlisted for a job because you're English, would that not pi** you off? Have we not as a world gotten over that BS yet??

     

    I've heard you can get the Daily Mail over here, so you should be alright. Now if you'll excuse me I've got some non-denominational multi-ethnic recycled 'holiday' cards to write.

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    Guest badlands

    hi mate i know ur lookin for engineers but ive worked offshore in uk 15 years deck crew ,rigger ,roustabout , labourer any chance of any contacts infor, agentices offshore recruiting comp cheers

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    Guest fuji70

    badlands I think you need the Aberdeen fan on the other thread. Fingers crossed he can get you something mate.x

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