Guest happymummy6

confused, and getting too many mixed replies

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    Guest happymummy6

    Hi, I'm 36 at the moment with husband and 6 children. We are not planning on leaving for at least 5 years time, just getting all the info we need together now for qualifications. I was about to start a counselling degree, but have been told that counsellors are ten a penny in Oz and we will not get a visa based on this career. So after looking into this I have decided to swap to a psychology degree. I will have at time of leaving a degree in Health and Social Care, a degree in Psychology, a diploma in Counselling, a diploma in Psychotherapy, a diploma in Hypnotherapy and be a certified life coach. I will have experience in being a support worker, 4 years paid experience in Hypnotherapy, 4 years paid experience in Counselling, unsure about the Psychology as I haven't begun the course yet, however there is a guaranteed paid work placement for 1 year at the end of the 3 year degree.

     

    My eldest son will be a qualified electrician, however he is currently doing a diploma in Public Services with a view to becoming a police officer on completion of his course (that's where his passion lays). We know he couldn't apply to become a police officer over there until he gained permanent residency, so he would more than likely fall back on the electrics until he was fully settled. However, we have also been told that Australia is not keen to employ UK police for their force, has anyone any views on this?

     

    My eldest daughter will be a fully qualified primary teacher by the time we leave. She will be working in a nursery to fund her degree for the 3 years. As with my career, not sure as to the work experience in her chosen path as she hasn't gained her degree yet. She would be happy to work in a school, nursery, as a nanny, etc.

     

    My younger son will be in his swap over year from A levels to Uni

     

    My 3 younger daughters will all be of school age, approx 5, 9, 13.

     

    My Husband is older than myself, currently 61, so unsure of how his visa will work, will he be on mine or need one of his own?

     

    We have spoken to emigration agents, who have given us VERY mixed responses. Also tried another forum, who too had mixed responses from keep trying to give up now.

     

    We don't really want to be apart as a family for any length of time, so we would ideally be putting in our visa's so that they would be (hopefully) approved very close together, then either those that have, could wait a short while and we go over together, or those that have could go over and set things up for the rest.

     

    Anyone know of any situations similar? I was becoming disheartened, but as they say, where there's a will, there's a way!

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    Hi, I'm 36 at the moment with husband and 6 children. We are not planning on leaving for at least 5 years time, just getting all the info we need together now for qualifications. I was about to start a counselling degree, but have been told that counsellors are ten a penny in Oz and we will not get a visa based on this career. So after looking into this I have decided to swap to a psychology degree. I will have at time of leaving a degree in Health and Social Care, a degree in Psychology, a diploma in Counselling, a diploma in Psychotherapy, a diploma in Hypnotherapy and be a certified life coach. I will have experience in being a support worker, 4 years paid experience in Hypnotherapy, 4 years paid experience in Counselling, unsure about the Psychology as I haven't begun the course yet, however there is a guaranteed paid work placement for 1 year at the end of the 3 year degree.

     

    My eldest son will be a qualified electrician, however he is currently doing a diploma in Public Services with a view to becoming a police officer on completion of his course (that's where his passion lays). We know he couldn't apply to become a police officer over there until he gained permanent residency, so he would more than likely fall back on the electrics until he was fully settled. However, we have also been told that Australia is not keen to employ UK police for their force, has anyone any views on this?

     

    My eldest daughter will be a fully qualified primary teacher by the time we leave. She will be working in a nursery to fund her degree for the 3 years. As with my career, not sure as to the work experience in her chosen path as she hasn't gained her degree yet. She would be happy to work in a school, nursery, as a nanny, etc.

     

    My younger son will be in his swap over year from A levels to Uni

     

    My 3 younger daughters will all be of school age, approx 5, 9, 13.

     

    My Husband is older than myself, currently 61, so unsure of how his visa will work, will he be on mine or need one of his own?

     

    We have spoken to emigration agents, who have given us VERY mixed responses. Also tried another forum, who too had mixed responses from keep trying to give up now.

     

    We don't really want to be apart as a family for any length of time, so we would ideally be putting in our visa's so that they would be (hopefully) approved very close together, then either those that have, could wait a short while and we go over together, or those that have could go over and set things up for the rest.

     

    Anyone know of any situations similar? I was becoming disheartened, but as they say, where there's a will, there's a way!

     

    You have imposed too many constraints to expect a simple answer. Nobody can advise you what the rules and regulations will be in 5 years, even the particulars of the foreshadowed changes 5 months ahead have not been confirmed. If you find anybody with a crystal ball that can let me know which (if any) skilled occupations will be wanted in 5+ years, please tell me.

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    Guest happymummy6
    You have imposed too many constraints to expect a simple answer. Nobody can advise you what the rules and regulations will be in 5 years, even the particulars of the foreshadowed changes 5 months ahead have not been confirmed. If you find anybody with a crystal ball that can let me know which (if any) skilled occupations will be wanted in 5+ years, please tell me.

     

    It wasn't the careers that I was after finding out information about, so no need to lend you my crystal ball. It was more so, the complexities of our family and that I was wondering if anyone else had had any of the issues of trying to move as a family with adult children, did they move over at the same time or was there a large time period where the family was separated, or a partner who was over the working visa age.

    I thought someone might have had one or both of these scenarios in their emigrating. I was just filling in the blanks about the careers as this may have been asked, as to what visas we were after.

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    It wasn't the careers that I was after finding out information about, so no need to lend you my crystal ball. It was more so, the complexities of our family and that I was wondering if anyone else had had any of the issues of trying to move as a family with adult children, did they move over at the same time or was there a large time period where the family was separated, or a partner who was over the working visa age.

    I thought someone might have had one or both of these scenarios in their emigrating. I was just filling in the blanks about the careers as this may have been asked, as to what visas we were after.

     

    You cannot include adult children unless they are single, not in a de facto relationship, not engaged to be married and they must be under 25 years of age, attending full time education and financially dependent upon you. The age of spouse is not a visa criterion unless 'spouse points' are being claimed.

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    Your tittle on this thread says a lot...

     

    [h=2]confused, and getting too many mixed replies[/h]

    Like Wrussell said there is a lot of info to try and give you an answer to all the questions you are asking.

     

    The rules change from day to day so no one can give you a definitive answer for any of your questions.

     

    Thats why you are probably getting mixed replies.

     

    Have you spoken to a registered migration agent about your move?

     

    These people tend to have the best knowledge to how the visa process is moving along.

     

    That said it changed three times for us during the two years of being on the conveyor belt to get the visa.

     

    Wishing you the best trying to get the answers you want.

     

    Rob and Mel

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    Have you spoken to a registered migration agent about your move?

     

    If the OP fills in our assessment forms I will provide a free 'yes or no' opinion about current visa prospects.

     

    There is a fee for advice about developing visa strategies.

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    Guest happymummy6
    If the OP fills in our assessment forms I will provide a free 'yes or no' opinion about current visa prospects.

     

    There is a fee for advice about developing visa strategies.

     

    Russell, if the 25yrs of age bracket still applies then, you have just cracked it for me. They were going to be 'rushed' through Uni to gain their degrees before we went so they would be able to apply for their own visas. But now knowing that the cut of for them to be classed as dependants is 25 if they are in education, that gives me a lot more leeway. I know that it will cost more for their fees to study after we leave, but if that's the way round it, then it will be worth it. It will also give us a little bit more breathing space to pay off the house here, rent it out to help cover mortgage cost there. Russell, thank you, thank you, thank you. (too be honest though, they're children no matter how old they get, so they'll always be using me as a cash machine....and launderette, wonder if that will count??)

    Edited by happymummy6

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    Russell, if the 25yrs of age bracket still applies then, you have just cracked it for me. They were going to be 'rushed' through Uni to gain their degrees before we went so they would be able to apply for their own visas. But now knowing that the cut of for them to be classed as dependants is 25 if they are in education, that gives me a lot more leeway. I know that it will cost more for their fees to study after we leave, but if that's the way round it, then it will be worth it. It will also give us a little bit more breathing space to pay off the house here, rent it out to help cover mortgage cost there. Russell, thank you, thank you, thank you. (too be honest though, their children no matter how old they get, so they'll always be using me as a cash machine....and launderette, wonder if that will count??)

     

     

    They have to be in full time education within a 'reasonable time' (not well defined) of having completed secondary.

     

    BTW I am a sole grandparent with 24/7 care of granddaughters aged , 3, 4, 7 and 15 so you don't have to tell me about operating as a laundromat or an ATM, or cook and bottle washer, taxi service, computer technician.

     

    What do you want for breakfast?

    3-year-old: My favourite Thai soup.

    Here it is.

    I have changed my mind, I want chicken

    Here it is

    I have changed my mind , I don't want ANYTHING

    In these circumstances I get the big girl to deal with them. She puts a meal in front of them and they eat it.

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    Guest happymummy6

    That sounds like when my husband asks the girls what they want, they run rings around him. If I'm in need of a giggle I just sit back and watch the chaos that follows.

     

    How have you found the transfer to Sydney, how long have you been over there? We are after moving to Western Sydney, fingers crossed.

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    We are after moving to Western Sydney, fingers crossed.

     

    Not Adelaide? If you haven't found it already, we have a sister site, Poms in Oz, which may give you more information about moving to NSW than you will find on here.

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    That sounds like when my husband asks the girls what they want, they run rings around him. If I'm in need of a giggle I just sit back and watch the chaos that follows.

     

    How have you found the transfer to Sydney, how long have you been over there? We are after moving to Western Sydney, fingers crossed.

     

    I was born in Australia.

     

    On the issue of transfer to Sydney:

     

    Early in 1991 the immigration department illegally cancelled my family's PR visas.

     

    It took me a while to get them back.

     

    In mid 1992 I arrived in George Street Sydney with my wife, our 3 children $328, no job and nowhere to go for the night.

     

    I have gone downhill from there.

     

     

     

    Best

     

    Westly Russell BA BSc PhD BEd MMA Registered Migration Agent

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    Why are you not considered coming for at least 5 years? Are you able to emigrate now? If so, I would get the ball rolling and get out here. The amount of people on this forum who were 'considering' coming then leave it too late and then find they can no longer get in because the rules have changed. Like other people have said in 5 years time who knows what the rules will be.

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    Why are you not considered coming for at least 5 years? Are you able to emigrate now? If so, I would get the ball rolling and get out here. The amount of people on this forum who were 'considering' coming then leave it too late and then find they can no longer get in because the rules have changed. Like other people have said in 5 years time who knows what the rules will be.

     

    Too true.

     

    It is possibly worth noting that if PR visa are granted the holders can validate them by briefly visiting Australia and then they have up to 5 years to make the move permanent.

     

    Here is slightly edited version of a warning published by a well-regarded senior Migration Law Specialist:

     

     

    A minefield -

     

    In the lead up to 1 July 2012 when extensive changes to the GSM, ENS, RSMS and business migration programs will commence many people are seeking help from advisers to lodge visa applications before the deadline.

     

    Advisers considering representing such people should be extremely careful as if the application is not lodged by 30 June 2012 or a faulty application is lodged there is unlikely to be an opportunity to rectify the problem .

     

    In cases where a skills assessment or state/territory sponsorship is still to be obtained it is vital to check whether such a skills assessment or sponsorship can be obtained before the deadline.

     

    And finally , last minute clients-these are people who have done some of the preliminary work themselves and then rush into an adviser’s office either wanting the adviser to “check” the application or to lodge it on their behalf.

     

     

    Taking on such clients is often a recipe for disaster and an OMARA complaint as if anything can go wrong it will go wrong.

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    Guest happymummy6
    Too true.

     

    It is possibly worth noting that if PR visa are granted the holders can validate them by briefly visiting Australia and then they have up to 5 years to make the move permanent.

     

    Here is slightly edited version of a warning published by a well-regarded senior Migration Law Specialist:

     

     

    A minefield -

     

    In the lead up to 1 July 2012 when extensive changes to the GSM, ENS, RSMS and business migration programs will commence many people are seeking help from advisers to lodge visa applications before the deadline.

     

    Advisers considering representing such people should be extremely careful as if the application is not lodged by 30 June 2012 or a faulty application is lodged there is unlikely to be an opportunity to rectify the problem .

     

    In cases where a skills assessment or state/territory sponsorship is still to be obtained it is vital to check whether such a skills assessment or sponsorship can be obtained before the deadline.

     

    And finally , last minute clients-these are people who have done some of the preliminary work themselves and then rush into an adviser’s office either wanting the adviser to “check” the application or to lodge it on their behalf.

     

     

    Taking on such clients is often a recipe for disaster and an OMARA complaint as if anything can go wrong it will go wrong.

     

    At present we are not in a financial position to move. We are currently in the process of buying our council house. At present we will qualify for £75'000 discount on the house, catch is, you have to own the house for 5 years after purchase otherwise you have to pay the council back a percentage of the sale. Husband being a plumber and son going into electrics, means we can fix the house up and add an extension increasing sale price when we move. With the incomes combined we will be able to pay off, or nigh on pay off the mortgage when we leave. Meaning we can either rent out this house to cover the mortgage for the house we buy over there, or sell this house at a profit and use the money to outright buy the house once we arrive.

    Also, for the first couple of years, if we are not PR then we will have to pay school fees for all of the children, which we don't have to pay here, I contacted the Sydney education department and we would be looking at around $9000 per child per year =$54'000 per year = $270'000 over the 5 years, so with that in mind we are looking at saving a bit more on school fees, whilst waiting for the house to be ready to be sold. Along with that, I can get funding for my next degree here which I can't get there. I know if granted PR, schooling isn't such an issue, but there is still the voluntary contributions that you don't have to pay here either.

    So staying here for 5 yrs will give us around £200'000 extra when we do finally make the move, meaning better house and I could set up my hypnotherapy practice, hubby could dabble in plumbing once he arrived and son can work as an electrician when we arrive, giving us a bit of breathing space not to have to worry about paying the mortgage, bills, food etc.

     

    I have looked at the poms in oz site, but I didn't get anywhere near as much help and advice as I have on this forum.

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    Guest Guest5035
    and I could set up my hypnotherapy practice, hubby could dabble in plumbing once he arrived and son can work as an electrician when we arrive, giving us a bit of breathing space not to have to worry about paying the mortgage, bills, food etc.

     

    .

    not quite that easy, licences required etc etc etc

     

    stevo

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    Guest Helchops

    Wow, that's a lot of 'ifs'! I remember reading about one bloke who turned up with a couple of grand and a tent and his life, a few years later, was very rich and rewarding (& financially so).

     

    When my partner and I decided to move, we just got stuck in. Deciding to wait 6+% of your LIFE in limbo is something I couldn't do.

     

    It's been a real struggle at times waiting since November (we go in July) but I couldn't do five years.

     

    Plus, who knows what immi will have done in five years time.

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    It's probably worth noting as well that a holder of a 457 in Sydney has to pay fees at state schools, but not here in SA. Well, not more than a local would pay anyway (a few hundred dollars a year depending on school and age of child).

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    Guest happymummy6

    We know that they will have to do the training to swap their skills over, but hubby isn't after going into a major work path. More so fixing up the house we buy and going on to fix up another for us to make a profit from (very much a house of 'Homes under the Hammer'). Eldest son will be able to put his skills once transferred to gaining a job. Looked into what I need to do and it's mainly swapping insurance for me. The emigration agent said he could help me with setting up a small business when we arrive.

     

    If it was just me, or husband and me, then I would quite happily go sooner regardless of money, but we have to do what's right for the children and gives them more stability.

     

    I did not know that about schooling in SA, what's the work situation like for social workers there?

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    The emigration agent said he could help me with setting up a small business when we arrive.

     

    That is an offer you can probably refuse.

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    John Ross

    From: The Australian

    February 01, 2012 12:00AM

    HUNDREDS of international students in Queensland have been unexpectedly hit with extra charges that could amount to tens of thousands of dollars, after the state government demanded they pay tuition fees for their school-age children.

    The move, which winds back one of Australia's most generous school fee exemption schemes for international students, reflects a growing trend for state governments to plug budget holes by slugging overseas students.

     

    Have fun, whatever you decide to do.

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    Guest happymummy6

    Hi Russell,

     

    That's kind of what I'm worried about, going over and then the rules change once we have arrived, then we can't afford to stay. Without the money to fall back on it's the children that will suffer, this is why I'm taking baby steps and ensuring that we can cover as many eventualities if or when they arrive.

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    Guest Sachertorte

    Really and truly no-one could be able to give you a reliable forecast, I'm afraid. Migration entails a huge financial risk and everything can change whilst you take 5 years to prepare for the move. The exchange rate also being one of them- the availability of affordable housing. When we bought our house we discovered the previous owners bought for half the price we did only 6 years prior :confused:

    We considered arranging a forward contract when the exchange rate was 2.6 to the pound and then we had to accept 1.7 to the GBP only 7 months later PLUS as in the meantime the housing market took a dive and had to lose a huge chunk on the house as well.

     

    Also the occupations allowed into Oz change... we took the chance when we had it ... 6 months after we applied for our visa the occupation was off the list.

     

    Here is where the conflicting, mixed feedback comes down to.... it's just a very unpredictable and volatile reality and you simply need to decide whether you are prepared to deal with lots of uncertainty.

     

    It certainly looks like you have good prospects in the UK. Looks at least sensible to perhaps take that into account in your decision whether to emigrate?

    Edited by Sachertorte

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    Guest Helchops

    Look before you leap...but if you are going to leap, don't look too long!

     

    Have you also considered that your son and daughter will probably have boyfriends/girlfriends in five years and will change their mind about the move? Will they be too old to be classed as dependants for the visa?

     

    Just more things to consider.

    Edited by Helchops

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    Easy to give advice when you're not caught up in the decision, I know, but if it were me I'd get the visa while it's available. If perm you can validate and then take your time with the move, but waiting to get the visa carries all kinds of risks (there are enough risks when migrating as it is without adding to them).

     

    Good luck, jim

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    Guest happymummy6

    Before starting this thread I wasn't aware that I could apply for the visa and then move later, just so long as I go over on a holiday, so that's what I'm looking onto now. That way kids will still be dependants for it.

     

    We have talked about the older kids may not want to go in a few years, but it's one of those 'cross that bridge when we come to it'. So far being the ott mother I am, I've managed to ward of any prospectives lol.

     

    We do have a lot of positives Sacherote, but the negatives far outweigh the positives.

     

    We have spent months worrying about his, talking to emigration agents and not one of them mentioned applying now and moving later, it's so frustrating! I'm so glad I posted on here, thank you everyone.

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