Jessica Berry

Unemployment rate hits 10 year high

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    Economists expect little improvement in the jobs market in the months ahead, after the unemployment rate hit six per cent for the first time in over 10 years.

     

    Australia's jobless rate for January rose from 5.8 per cent in December, according to seasonally adjusted figures from the Australian Bureau of Statistics.

     

    "The unemployment rate should continue to edge higher over the next six months or so and this expectation fits in with the Reserve Bank of Australia's outlook for the jobs market," St George chief economist Besa Deda said.

     

    "The slowdown in mining investment is making its presence felt among the resource states, with the soft labour market present in Western Australia and Queensland likely to persist."

     

    RBC currency strategist Michael Turner said ongoing deterioration in the labour market was to be expected.

     

    But the jobs figures would not cause the RBA board to regret their recent decision to signal a period of stable interest rates.

     

    "People have been expecting a little bit more of a bounce back from December's employment growth numbers but that wasn't to be," he said.

     

    Mr Turner expects the unemployment rate to drift a little higher in the first half of 2014 before moderating in the fourth quarter and into 2015.

     

    "Given the slow pace of employment growth it's hard to see it getting back below six per cent on a sustained basis for most of this year," he said.

     

    "The leading economic indicators have indeed improved gives some hope that the peak in the unemployment rate is not too far away."

     

    Ms Deda also said leading indicators of employment, such as job ads, have been stabilising over recent months.

     

    "Employment gauges are a lagging indicator of the economy and so the improvement witnessed in the economy over the past months would not yet show up in the labour numbers," she said.

     

    The growth in part-time employment at the expense of full-time employment could be explained by employers not wishing to lay off employees because of an anticipation that economic activity will improve, Ms Deda said.

     

    "There was a lift in average hours worked in January, but for now firms are still not willing to take on the risk of lifting their headcount," she said.

     

    The total number of people with jobs fell 3,700 in January, and was down 23,000 in December.

     

    Full-time employment fell 7,100 in January and part-time employment was up 3,400

     

     

    (ninemsn 13/2/14)

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    Guest BurgessFamily

    Luckily people are giving up looking for jobs (aka participation rate), which is helping keep the unemployment rate under control.

     

    The next Federal budget should interesting, they have earmarked 130 BILLION DOLLARS of government asset sales!

     

    "psst...wanna buy a stobie pole?"

     

    http://www.marketwatch.com/story/australia-readies-more-than-100-billion-in-asset-sales-2014-02-12

    Edited by BurgessFamily

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    Guest Guest8609

    What about hidden unemployment? Who counts unemployed immigrants? Because if they don't qualify for benefits for about 2 years, they simply don't register as unemployed/jobseekers, right?

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    Guest ColinOz
    What about hidden unemployment? Who counts unemployed immigrants? Because if they don't qualify for benefits for about 2 years, they simply don't register as unemployed/jobseekers, right?

    we are not unemployed because we are doing casual jobs :jiggy:, we are underemployed

    Edited by ColinOz

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    South Australian unemployment rate falls to 6.6 per cent as other states rise but remains the highest on the mainland

    • by: LAUREN NOVAK, DANIEL WILLS
    • From: The Advertiser
    • February 13, 20144:35PM
       
      SOUTH Australia’s unemployment rate has fallen to its lowest level insix months, despite new data showing joblessness is on the increase across thenation.

      The Australian Bureau of Statistics today released labour force data forJanuary, which shows SA’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate now stands at 6.6 per cent, down from 6.8 per cent in December.

      In contrast, the national unemploymentrate rose from 5.8 to 6 per cent.

      In all states other than SA, the rate either flatlined or rose.

      Tasmania recorded a 7.6 per cent jobless rate, meaning SA’s unemploymentrate remains the highest of any mainland state.

      Western Australia has the lowest rate at 5.1 per cent.

      In a bid to address long-term unemployment in Adelaide’s northernsuburbs, the State Government has committed $2 million to expanding a targetedjob support program.

      Employment Minister Grace Portolesi said the money would help a further350 families in the Playford area with support to help find employment over thenext three years.

      The program will be run by Uniting Care Wesley and target the Playfordarea.

      Ms Portolesi said more than 1700 people had already benefited from theBuilding Family Opportunities program.

      “This program brings together long-term jobless families, local community organisations, government and employers to find solutions to complex issues that prevent families from participating in employment,” she said.

      “By addressing these immediate issues, families are then able to worktowards developing their skills and find work, with everyone supporting one another and drawing on the strength of the family unit.”

      Opposition employment spokesman Iain Evans said the Liberal party’s planto grow the economy and spark jobs growth included cutting payroll tax “whichwill result in savings to more than 8,000 businesses across the state”.

      “The State Liberals understand that the importance of providing payroll tax cuts to businesses to encourage them to employ more South Australians,’ hesaid.

      “We want to take the Weatherill Labor Government’s handbrake off oureconomy to get our state moving again and that’s exactly what this payroll taxcut will do.”

      Despite the improvement in the headline unemployment rate, the number of South Australians employed has continued to fall. Two thousand fewer people are employed now compared with December.

      The number of South Australians employed is now 796,600, the lowest level since late 2009.

      Since the 2010 election, when former premier Mike Rann promised theState Government would create 100,000 jobs over six years, only 2000 jobs have been added.

      The state’s workforce participation rate, which measures the number ofpeople in work or looking for employment, had dropped to its lowest level since 2006.

      Mr Evans said the drop in the participation rate showed South Australians “have given up looking for work on Premier Weatherill’s watch”.

      Ms Portolesi said the government had announced projects that wouldgenerate jobs in
      South Australia.

      “Companies like HP expanding into this state will see hundreds of newjobs created,’ she said.

      “We are also working with local councils to fast track building community facilities to create
      jobs and stimulate local economies.”

    Edited by Jessica Berry

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    "Despite the improvement in the headline unemployment rate, the number of South Australians employed has continued to fall. Two thousand fewer people are employed now compared with December."

     

    Just shows the truth of the lies, damned lies, and statistics cliche!

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    Guest BurgessFamily

    more telling regarding SA jobs figures was...

     

    "The proportion of the state's population in work or looking for work fell to 61.8 per cent."

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    Guest Guest8609
    we are not unemployed because we are doing casual jobs :jiggy:, we are underemployed

     

    Well, I am unemployed and I even found it difficult to get a volunteering 'job'.

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    Like I posted on previous a thread, Adelaide is going to be the Detroit of Australia, shame that the State is getting revenue from un suspecting blinkered migrants from all over the Globe......it is funny however that SA is still on a mass migrant recruitment drive, when there just aren't the jobs, or the FULL time jobs over here ATM. What are the poms and migrants expected to do, spend all their funds they come over with, pfffft would rather stay in blighty, with a full time job and security.

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    Like I posted on previous a thread, Adelaide is going to be the Detroit of Australia, shame that the State is getting revenue from un suspecting blinkered migrants from all over the Globe......it is funny however that SA is still on a mass migrant recruitment drive, when there just aren't the jobs, or the FULL time jobs over here ATM. What are the poms and migrants expected to do, spend all their funds they come over with, pfffft would rather stay in blighty, with a full time job and security.

     

    The job situation is tough, no doubt about it, but only about 5% of migrants to Aus come (come and stay, that is) to SA. It's been on a migrant recruitment drive for years - first saw Mike Rann on a Sky News article spruiking the state in 2005 - but hasn't quite found the knack of making it happen. Not saying that's good or bad, just that by comparison to other states we don't get many migrants (Tassie excepted, 'cos nobody goes there!)

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    What about hidden unemployment? Who counts unemployed immigrants? Because if they don't qualify for benefits for about 2 years, they simply don't register as unemployed/jobseekers, right?

     

    Even under the 2 years newly arrived waiting period you can register with centrelink. Hubby did this twice when he has unemployed. Besides the registration centrelink was friendly and tried to help with job assistance and transferred him to a job agency.

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    The job situation is tough, no doubt about it, but only about 5% of migrants to Aus come (come and stay, that is) to SA. It's been on a migrant recruitment drive for years - first saw Mike Rann on a Sky News article spruiking the state in 2005 - but hasn't quite found the knack of making it happen. Not saying that's good or bad, just that by comparison to other states we don't get many migrants (Tassie excepted, 'cos nobody goes there!)

     

    So true! Not only getting many migrants but also staying here.

    Many migrants arrived with children and this next grown up generation has to move interstate. I know some adult children of migrants who were forced to move away due to lack of job opportunities, often highly qualified people.

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    There just isn't the jobs in Adelaide the Australians are struggling as to are the poms who have been there for a while so all the newbies with their deluded ideas of the new utopia don't stand a chance really, it's very hard over here ATM. I have found that the Australians are looking after their own and it's getting a lot harder for the keen and green newbies.

     

    Out of 12 families who have come over with us in the last 2 years, 9 have gone back to blighty, I've friends who have gone back to Canada and the US and a lot more have jumped state.

     

    It may be portrayed as the lucky country, but SA isn't the lucky state ATM.

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    In my opinion, if people are emigrating purely for the reason of work and that reason only and are only prepared to work in their profession and at the same level you may struggle. While it might not be what people want to hear, the reality is that many migrants (myself included) may have to work at a lower level, take a sideways step, retrain and have periods of unemployment (which you need to make financial provision for). You have to be flexible and adaptable in your approach to work, especially when you arrive and are looking for your first job. I think people need to be honest with themselves and other family members about whether they are truely up for the challenge (if they need to be) before they come.

     

    I think for many people there is still this perception that they will arrive at Adelaide airport and be flooded with job offers on high salaries. I am not sure where this perception comes from, or whether people are so obsessed with the notion of 'living the dream' that they are not prepared to listen to anything other than this vision of life in Australia. There is also an unrealistic view of the timescale it will take to get work and people are panicking after a few weeks of being here. Having said that, I also see examples of migrants not helping themselves and blaming Australia/Adelaide for a lack of opportunities when it can be down to the individual almost sabotaging their chances of gaining work.

     

    I still believe that there are opportunities available but it does depend on your skill set, attitude, understanding the way things work in Adelaide and having some patience - it takes time to re-establish yourselves from scratch.

    Edited by Jessica Berry

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    Guest kobi

    Hi all, interesting thread.

     

    My wife and I are looking to move over to Australia. We are in our mid 30's and we have good jobs here in the a nice part of the UK ( berkshire ).

    Wife is a pharmacist ( and manager ) of 14 years and I'm a sales office manager.

     

    Our motivation to look at moving is mostly to give our children a different and hopefully better lifestyle, one that encourages going into the outdoors to enjoy the climate and what it has to offer.

    We are fed up with the UK weather and having to keep the kids indoors because its too cold or wet outside.

     

    Wifes occupation is still listed as an occupation in demand on the skills occupation list in the southern australia territory, which is what ignited our interest in Adelaide.

    I've read both positive and negative things about the city and state but we plan on visiting soon to make our own opinions.

     

    The thing that confuses me most is why the state still seems intent on marketing itself as an area of growth to migrants when it seems according to a lot forums that the work really isn't there.

    Is this opinion from residents of SA, one based on general experiences or more relevant to those looking for work without specific skills sets/occupations?

     

    As much as my wife seems to think she would find work as a pharmacist, i'm not so sure my own prospects would be that great, although to be honest i'm happy to work in any environment / occupation as long as it helps pay the bills... but worried there just isn't the work out there that seems to be portrayed on certain SA govt sites.

     

    Any comments or snippets of advice most welcome.

    thx

    Kobi

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    Guest BurgessFamily

    In some areas, SA is struggling jobs wise. Youth unemployment is as high as 20% in some areas (like North Adelaide), with overall unemployment continuing to creep higher. Holden is closing, and with Ford and Toyota following there will be a huge knock on through suppliers etc... The state is heavily in debt, and either needs to start raising revenue or taxes (or both) to fill the hole - it can't keep spend far beyond it's means indefinitely.

     

    On the plus side, there is a lot of housing construction happening, with a lot of investors sinking money into new bricks and mortar, especially in the Southern suburbs. So they must see real potential here. The express-way work is almost complete, and the rail line upgrade well on the way (with a chance it will be extended again soon to Aldinga).

     

    Regarding SA, the state makes good money from migrants ...they bring money and spend it (from visas, to white goods, etc...). Once they have spent some good money, a number of them return home. Also, SA does experience negative migration, so does need to 'back fill'. :D

     

    Note, if you are willing to be flexible and stay positive, you will likely find work and survive.

     

    ...and don't be surprised if you end up fed up of putting sun lotion on all the kids and making sure they have hats etc... day after day (you need a good 30 mins planning time to any time spent in the sun... lol). :)

    Edited by BurgessFamily

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    Regarding SA, the state makes good money from migrants ...they bring money and spend it (from visas, to white goods, etc...). Once they have spent some good money, a number of them return home. Also, SA does experience negative migration, so does need to 'back fill'. :D

     

    Note, if you are willing to be flexible and stay positive, you will likely find work and survive.

     

    I fully agree with both points. I'm not sure how the SA gov portrays things to would-be migrants these days, but when we were making the move the reality didn't quite match the rhetoric ...

     

    Regarding the second point, no doubt there's work available for those who are flexible, and even more so for those willing to do 'anything'. Personally, there's no way I'd give up good jobs and a nice lifestyle in the UK to travel to the other end of the world and do 'anything'. I moved here on a skilled visa because I believed there was a shortage of my skills and I'd therefore get a job in my chosen career. I was willing to accept, as part of that deal, that I'd probably work at a lower level for a while, but I'd not have come here to do 'anything'. The SA government must high five itself everytime it hears that a skilled and well qualified worker from the UK is willing to come here, sinking their money into the economy and willing to do work that many less skilled people here won't do. (If someone's looking for a change of career, then great, but that's not what I mean.) There are some demoralising jobs under that basket of 'anything' and most don't pay well.

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    I fully agree with both points. I'm not sure how the SA gov portrays things to would-be migrants these days, but when we were making the move the reality didn't quite match the rhetoric ...

     

    Regarding the second point, no doubt there's work available for those who are flexible, and even more so for those willing to do 'anything'. Personally, there's no way I'd give up good jobs and a nice lifestyle in the UK to travel to the other end of the world and do 'anything'. I moved here on a skilled visa because I believed there was a shortage of my skills and I'd therefore get a job in my chosen career. I was willing to accept, as part of that deal, that I'd probably work at a lower level for a while, but I'd not have come here to do 'anything'. The SA government must high five itself everytime it hears that a skilled and well qualified worker from the UK is willing to come here, sinking their money into the economy and willing to do work that many less skilled people here won't do. (If someone's looking for a change of career, then great, but that's not what I mean.) There are some demoralising jobs under that basket of 'anything' and most don't pay well.

     

    I really do think that "doing anything" is a relative and mute point.

     

    I will be willing to "do anything" when I arrive in SA as I have had enough of the false hierarchical job snobbery here in the UK.

    As long as I am happy at my work, I am providing a wage to get by and ensure a safe and happy life for my family.....whilst reducing the mind squeezing and soul destroying levels of responsibility I encounter in the UK whilst trying to pretend that everything is OK.......then Doing anything is a pretty good option.

    Doing Anything is always with a level of personal choice....and sometimes that comes with a trade off against lifestyle and mental stability. Not everything is about the greater politics and whether or not a career path should take presidence over and above the person doing the job.

    I have skills....I have qualifications....I have experience.....but i will be willing to take on something that offers me the chance to relinquish some pressure from my life until i feel that i can jump back on the responsibility ladder. If other people benefit from this.....then fair play.........it's all good.

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    I really do think that "doing anything" is a relative and mute point.

     

    I will be willing to "do anything" when I arrive in SA as I have had enough of the false hierarchical job snobbery here in the UK.

    As long as I am happy at my work, I am providing a wage to get by and ensure a safe and happy life for my family.....whilst reducing the mind squeezing and soul destroying levels of responsibility I encounter in the UK whilst trying to pretend that everything is OK.......then Doing anything is a pretty good option.

    Doing Anything is always with a level of personal choice....and sometimes that comes with a trade off against lifestyle and mental stability. Not everything is about the greater politics and whether or not a career path should take presidence over and above the person doing the job.

    I have skills....I have qualifications....I have experience.....but i will be willing to take on something that offers me the chance to relinquish some pressure from my life until i feel that i can jump back on the responsibility ladder. If other people benefit from this.....then fair play.........it's all good.

     

    Good for you - which is why I wrote 'If someone's looking for a change of career, then great'. Setting out to take a job with lower levels of responsibility etc is rather different from hoping to continue where you left off and finding that you can't, even though you thought there was a shortage.

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    Guest BurgessFamily

    Australia is a wonderful sunny place... but for many there is still the usual rat race, working long hours, hour(s) long commute, and bills to pay. Come with your eyes wide open and a balanced prospective and you will less likely be disappointed.

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    Even if new migrants are flexible and willing to do jobs locals wouldn't do many employers here are not flexible at all!

    My highly skilled hubby working as an casual unskilled labourer in the automotive industry was sacked again 3 days ago due to having an appointment!!!

    He usually started at 6 am and wanted to go after 1 pm which was approved by the supervisor but dismissed by the manager.

    Seems to me that SA is going more and more into the direction of slave and day labour.

    Even if many new arriving migrants tend to do 'anything' many employers won't honour this due to having hundreds of applicants for the job.

    New migrants usually bring in their savings, their whole cash which means good revenue for the SA government. They also need accommodation, school uniforms for the kids, food, drinks, furniture, internet, at least 1 car (rather 2). Not only positive for the government on the brink but moreover really good cash cows for landlords, real estate agents, retail, second hand car dealers.

    Sorry guys for being so cynical but the whole uncertainty here upsets me completely.

    Edited by Rabeah

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    Guest Claire-n-tel

    My highly skilled hubby working as an casual unskilled labourer in the automotive industry was sacked again 3 days ago due to having an appointment!!!

    He usually started at 6 am and wanted to go after 1 pm which was approved by the supervisor but dismissed by the manager.

     

    Rabeah......this sounds a bit off.......i guess it depends on lots of things how off it was ie what the appointment was for and if he still went after manager didn't agree?

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    Hi Claire,

     

    to clarify the issue, my hubby is hired through a recruitment company and borrowed to that automotive company on a casual basis. He had a job interview last Friday - of course he didn't tell anybody the real reason going earlier - and the manager told his recruitment company they don't need him any longer. Going earlier was approved by the supervisor but the management plays its own 'game'. When you're not 100 % doing what the employer want you to do in this particular industry you can go after 2 (not doing overtime and weekend work) or 3 (going earlier) 'incidents'. I've to add that this company will be sold in 2016 due to Holden's closure.

    Due to doing TAFE Diploma courses in the evening he also couldn't do overtime or weekend shifts, so therefore a

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    oh sorry the rest of the sentence is missing!

    Addition: ....so therefore a more difficult employee or 'disturbance to the operational procedures'.

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