Guest Rachael M Bowen

A really stupid question...but I really need an answer

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    Guest Rachael M Bowen

    Whilst flicking through the hundreds of TV channels last night we stumbled across a documentary about Adelaide Thunderbirds Netball Team (now there's a conversation in itself). They are sponsored by a housing development company which we googled, and yes they build lovely houses. So this got me thinking....... a desirable feature for buying a house in the UK is to have a south facing garden as this gets the sun (when it's playing) all day.

     

    Now before I ask my question please read the little verse below as this will explain and excuse why I need to ask and need to know an answer....

     

    "Derbyshire, Derbyshire, born and bred. Strong in arm, thick in head"

     

     

     

    As most things appear to be opposites between UK and Australia, such as seasons, night and day, direction of water down a plughole (I think?) etc, does this also apply to the sun and gardens?? When I am in the position to be house hunting in Adelaide would I want a NORTH facing garden if I wanted the sun all day??

     

    I do hope no-one from DIAC reads this as I'm sure they'll never let me in Hee Hee.

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    Guest Rachael M Bowen

    PHEW!!!!!! I cannot begin to count how many times I woke last night thinking about it! I really need to get out more LOL

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    Guest Guest12727

    Not a stupid question at all.

     

    I think of it differently, more in terms of energy efficiency and reducing power bills by using the winter sun to warm the house. So based on that, you want a block that allows living area windows facing North (20W to 30E of true north is considered acceptable), which will capture the winter sun and passively heat the house. You also want solar panels on North facing roof surface, and it is much nicer to not have these facing the street (although plenty of people do). So an East West orientation block allows for this, however, if the block is narrow you could get unwanted shading from the neighbours house on those important northern windows.

     

    We often want some shade in the garden in summer, as it is really too hot for full sun, so this isn't such an issue.

     

    By the way, the water doesn't go down the drain the other way, this is a myth.

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    Google up house orientation in Adelaide, you will get several options there for different areas around Adelaide. includes best design practices living areas and outdoor areas.

     

    As a very general guide you need a north facing living area with larger windows to let plenty of light in, wide eaves to give shade from direct sun in summer but the lower winter sun will shine in to give warmth, small or no windows to the western side as this will get what is known as the vicious western sun. Usually developments take this into consideration and is looked at at planning stage, certain house blocks can have a premium or sell quickly for good orientation.

    Have fun looking it's all part of the exciting journey in coming to OZ.

    Keith

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    "Derbyshire, Derbyshire, born and bred. Strong in arm, thick in head"

    .

     

    Just googled this verse up, pretty much any county or city/town seems to use it with the odd one from outside the uk too. Really strange that, I always thought it was Lancastrian:biglaugh:. Though it would not matter how you orientated a house there, sun! what sun?:tongue:

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    Guest Rachael M Bowen

    Hey I have you know we've had 4 weeks of sun this year :cool: but is that cos i'm now in sunny Notts? LOL. :nah:

     

    I have to say I had not even thought of things such as using winter sun as a heat source, orientation of windows etc. Defo want an area out of the sun too, this is a real must, just love the covered alfresco areas that some of the properties have.

     

    Howde & Keith would it be ok to copy your posts for my own reference? I know I will forget all this when the time comes. Thanks to all that replied, really appreciate it x going to catch up on my :SLEEP:now I have some answers. The things that go through your head at silly O'clock hey!!!

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    Adelaide has the highest average temperatures and the highest recorded temperature of all Australian state capitals. Bury the house.

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    I would have thought other states would have higher average temps? Darwin, although not a state, is certainly higher. I would guess the further north you go the higher the average, Sydney and Brisbane have warmer winters than us.

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    Guest Guest12727

    [quote

     

    Howde & Keith would it be ok to copy your posts for my own reference? !

     

    Copy away.

     

    .........and water doesn't go down the drain different ways in different hemisphere, unless your drain is 10km wide!!!!! http://www.abc.net.au/science/articles/2004/11/18/1244639.htm.

     

    Don't believe everything you read on this site - everyone has a different opinion.

     

    Cheers

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    [quote

     

    Howde & Keith would it be ok to copy your posts for my own reference? !

     

    Copy away.

     

    .........and water doesn't go down the drain different ways in different hemisphere, unless your drain is 10km wide!!!!! http://www.abc.net.au/science/articles/2004/11/18/1244639.htm.

     

    Don't believe everything you read on this site - everyone has a different opinion.

     

    Cheers

     

    oh yes it does Howde, and thanks for providing the evidence, the 6th paragraph says "yes" and the 7th paragraph mentions the two experiments which proved it:tongue:

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    :idea:Have 'Mythbusters' ever done an experment on this? theirs would be a 'in the realworld' experiment. But in the meantime as I will not have a sink, basin or toilet 10km wide, but 9mm is a possibility, then I accept the controlled experiment as proof.:notworthy:. Now you will have me checking plugholes ( give the toilet a miss though) around the world for the rest of my life:arghh:

    Cheers.

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    Guest Guest12727

    oh yes it does Howde, and thanks for providing the evidence, the 6th paragraph says "yes" and the 7th paragraph mentions the two experiments which proved it:tongue:

     

    I read OPs 'down a plughole' as a standard household sink / bath plughole (or toilet), where you won't see this effect.

    I agree it happens theoretically, but none of us can 'see' it, and I think many Poms would be expecting to see this with their own eyes. I remember looking at the bath water going down the plughole when I moved to UK to see it 'go the other way' but it was always random.

     

    We can agree to differ :biggrin:

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    I would have thought other states would have higher average temps? Darwin, although not a state, is certainly higher. I would guess the further north you go the higher the average, Sydney and Brisbane have warmer winters than us.

     

    It is not a matter of opinion.

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