Blossom

Baby shopping

    Recommended Posts

    I am not a born shopper. I'm not that keen on it in general.

    We are expecting a baby in October and are going to have to get baby furniture, car seat, push chair etc.

     

    I'm not interested in buying things just for names (I don't know any of them anyway lol). So where are the best places to go? We had a quick look around haggle baby and they seemed alright.

    And the other important question, are we best off buying everything next month in the end of financial year sales?

     

    Thanks. :-)

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest Guest12727

    I haven't shopped for baby stuff here but have you tried Target Baby and Toys R Us? I would also check out the dept stores, you might be surprised - and if you want to risk it, the sales would give you good savings.

     

    My nephews wife just had twins at 29weeks. They are not very prepared!

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Wow! I'd be horrified to give birth that early! My partner is all for buying everything now (I'm nearly 15 weeks) whereas I feel like we should wait. Even the sales seems too soon, but I like a bargain lol.

    I have looked at ikea, target, Kmart and big w. Apparently toys r us has a baby's r us at their gepps x store but I haven't made it their yet. Baby bunting seemed very pricey.

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Ikea do fab baby stuff. I don't see the point of splashing a heap on baby furniture as it is grown out of within a few years. They do durable, colourful stuff that is easy to clean and wears well. Funky to.

     

    Best highchair ever is the Ikea one. Cheap, brilliant to keep clean and wash off and can sit to the table or with a tray. Don't spend a small fortune on an expensive fancy thing. They sell cushion inserts also

     

    http://www.ikea.com/au/en/catalog/products/40157918/

     

    I'd not buy masses now if it were me. I think we did most of our shopping around 28-30 weeks. Having said that, if you have the money and room to store it, go for it, but perhaps wait a bit longer.

     

    Key things to buy when you do are car seat, pushchair/pram and if you want it a cot. I don't think we really used a cot the first few months though as we co slept. Lots of baby stuff is really not needed I think. Its often sat unused or goes in the pile of used once, never again. The rest falls in to place as and when I reckon.

     

    Bear in mind premature babies spend a while in hospital so lots of stuff still can be bought after their arrival :)

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Yes I'm a bit torn on the cot. We are probably going to have a bassinet in our room for a bit, but then I wonder if we should have a cot for day naps?

     

    Feel free to list not needed stuff. :-)

     

    l moved here just as my friends were all having kids so I've missed all the discussions on what is useful and what isn't. My partner has a 14 year old daughter but has a shocking memory too. Lol.

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Yes I'm a bit torn on the cot. We are probably going to have a bassinet in our room for a bit, but then I wonder if we should have a cot for day naps?

     

    Feel free to list not needed stuff. :-)

     

    l moved here just as my friends were all having kids so I've missed all the discussions on what is useful and what isn't. My partner has a 14 year old daughter but has a shocking memory too. Lol.

     

    Baby will want to sleep *on you* the first few weeks, perhaps more :wubclub: Getting a newborn into a cot on their own is a big ask and honestly, they just want to be close to a heartbeat and milk. A moses basket is great as it can be carted around to be in whatever room you are in.

     

    Stuff not needed, IMHO of course ;)

     

    Top n tail bowl for bathing. Waste of space. Also a baby bath if you are me. We just got in the tub with him or took him in the shower near the end.

    Baby lotions and potions like baby bubble bath. Often more irritating to skin than helpful.

    Lots of clothes. Honestly, newborns and small babies its so much easier to leave them in babygros and the like. For you and them :)

     

    There is more but am about to head out. Will PM later :)

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    I wouldn't bother with a Moses basket as they grow out of them so quickly. And if you have a big or long baby they might not fit in them at all. What is worth buying and what isn't depends very much on what kind of parent you are and what feels like the right thing to do for you. It also to an extent depends on the baby. We had a crib in our room for the first few weeks for our first but the second went straight in the cot. For day time naps he slept in the pram down stairs (a proper 'old fashioned' style pram with a proper mattress) but only because it was easier for me with having two to put him somewhere handy. My first spent a lot of his daytime naps in the car seat (only way I could get him to sleep sometimes was to take him for a drive), or on me. After a while I was able to put him down on the sofa once he had fallen asleep and as he got older during the day he mostly fell asleep on me and then slept on the sofa.

     

    I would think about how you think you might like to be with the baby and then buy the minimum number of things to allow you to do that. Then if you find that actually you want to do something different then you can buy that thing at the time. My life is littered with baby things we thought would be a good idea but hardly got used. I agree with snifter on the clothes thing and the baby bath. I'd also add changing table to the list - all you need is a wipe clean changing mat and a floor. Much safer if you need to go get something while changing the baby.

     

    Just as an aside, the best advice someone gave me while I was pregnant was to listen politely to whatever advice people give you then just go and do what feels right for you. Didn't listen with the first and was a paranoid mess, but it worked well with the second.

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest Guest12727

    Mine slept in a pram in the day too. Meant I didn't have to keep going upstairs to check him. It was a good quality pram, that had a basket like a basinet for when they were newborns, then converted to a more seating style as they grew, but could still be laid flat for sleeping. I think if there is one thing it is worth spending the extra on it is a good, functional, adaptable pram that will adapt from baby to toddler. It is important that baby can lie properly flat to sleep.

     

    We borrowed a crib, which I just sat on the cot base to get it off the ground. They are very little and can look a bit lost in a cot, but do grow out of the crib pretty quickly.

    I wasn't very maternal, and hadn't even built the cot or made up the crib when I went into hospital in labour. I was going to do that the following week, but went into labour 10 days before due date. We had one baby outfit. Hubby made a quick dash to the shops when he was born and a friend who'd had a baby girl a couple of months earlier passed on some newborn stuff. Didn't matter that he had on pink bodies, no-one could see them. Then with gifts etc, we soon had plenty. My family in Aus sent over Bonds toweling babygrow - they were the best things - would recommend those.

     

    Main priorities - car seat, good pram, something to sleep on and bedding that can be layered, a wrapping blanket, nappies, a plain barrier cream for nappy change time and change mat, burp cloths for over your shoulder and to wipe the sick and basic clothing. If you are inclined, you may want a baby sling thing. I had something that went in the main bath, can't remember exactly what it was, but was great for supporting the baby and leaving two hands free.

     

    Not sure there is much else you actually need for a newborn. Those mats with the hanging things over are great for a couple of months in, get one where you can change the toy, or add your own bits to for variety.

     

    You may want to consider making a net for the doorway that you fix to the doorframe with velcro to stop your cats getting into the baby's cot.

    Edited by Guest12727

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Buy cheap clothes, the baby grows so quickly at the beginning don't spend a lot. After the first few months quality clothes are better value for money as they will last longer.

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Now this is a subject I love :jiggy: - I've owned over 20 prams/pushchairs throughout my baby/2 babies in 12 month/childminding days; I even had a market stall selling "natural" baby products for a while - washable nappies, slings, etc.

     

    But as the others have said it is all so personal to how you'll want to parent your baby but if you need someone to come and browse with you...

     

    With regards to sleeping we used a hammock (http://betterbabyshop.com.au/shop/amby-air-baby-hammock-value-package/?gclid=CPf4leeYkb4CFcmXvQodJBcAqQ) for our third and she stayed in it until she was 10 months old, she could have used it for longer but we were rearranging bedrooms and it made sense at the time to move her out, if I could go back and do it all again we'd have had one from the start.

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    I didn't buy anything until a few weeks before due date in case something went wrong! We were given a 2nd hand cot, which was great for both our children, I just bought a new mattress. Had a moses basket for early days, but during the day the pram was more convenient for sleeps as it was downstairs. My second had a baby sleeping bag, which she loved. It lasted for ages as I just added extra material to the bottom when her legs got too long. It was a great idea as babies are really good at kicking all the covers off and then waking up cold. There is an awful lot of stuff out there that really isn't necessary but you do need a wipeable change mat you can just put down anywhere for changing nappies, and I also made a lot of use of a changing bag which had a small change mat in it and room for nappies and wipes. Great if you are travelling or visiting round other peoples houses. For the first few days you just need vests, nappies, wipes, baby gros, blankets and sheets and a changing mat, plus nappisan or some good stain remover for getting rid of all the poo stains when the nappy leaks! Don't even spend too much on baby-gros because you don't know how big your baby is going to be. My first was quite small and the vests we had swamped him and we had to get some smaller sizes (he's taller than me now though)! If your baby is big then you might waste money on clothes that are too small.

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Also, if you are going to be breatfeeding for a while you will need a good feeding bra and some breast pads (for leaks). If you are going to be bottle feeding then there is loads of stuff (bottles, sterilisers etc), I breast fed mine so I didn't really get into all that.

     

    One really important thing to get you through the early months/years is to try and hook up with a group of other Mums with babies the same age. In England there were ante-natal classes run at the local doctors, and there was a session booked for after we had all had our babies to get together. From that, a group of 5 of us decided to meet up regularly with the babies for afternon tea. We kept this up every week until the children were all at school, even then we met up in school holidays. I am still in touch with them, we all met up last year when we went back to England for a holiday, and the children are the best of friends (on Facebook now)! It was invaluable to have a group of other mums to share things with, we really were a support group for each other and it certainly made motherhood much easier and much more fun.

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Now this is a subject I love :jiggy: - I've owned over 20 prams/pushchairs throughout my baby/2 babies in 12 month/childminding days; I even had a market stall selling "natural" baby products for a while - washable nappies, slings, etc.

     

    But as the others have said it is all so personal to how you'll want to parent your baby but if you need someone to come and browse with you...

     

    With regards to sleeping we used a hammock (http://betterbabyshop.com.au/shop/amby-air-baby-hammock-value-package/?gclid=CPf4leeYkb4CFcmXvQodJBcAqQ) for our third and she stayed in it until she was 10 months old, she could have used it for longer but we were rearranging bedrooms and it made sense at the time to move her out, if I could go back and do it all again we'd have had one from the start.

    Those hammocks look pretty cool. I think we are going to go for an enclosed bassinet to start with though. We shut the cats out of the bedroom this morning. Within 10 minutes they had managed to open two doors.

    I figured we would just put baby in their own room from the off where the cats can't get, but partner thinks baby should be with us. Apparently the SIDS guidelines say they should be in your room for the first 6-12 months.

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Also, if you are going to be breatfeeding for a while you will need a good feeding bra and some breast pads (for leaks). If you are going to be bottle feeding then there is loads of stuff (bottles, sterilisers etc), I breast fed mine so I didn't really get into all that.

     

    One really important thing to get you through the early months/years is to try and hook up with a group of other Mums with babies the same age. In England there were ante-natal classes run at the local doctors, and there was a session booked for after we had all had our babies to get together. From that, a group of 5 of us decided to meet up regularly with the babies for afternon tea. We kept this up every week until the children were all at school, even then we met up in school holidays. I am still in touch with them, we all met up last year when we went back to England for a holiday, and the children are the best of friends (on Facebook now)! It was invaluable to have a group of other mums to share things with, we really were a support group for each other and it certainly made motherhood much easier and much more fun.

     

    So far I've not managed to find any maternity bras small enough for me. :-(

    I am joining a pregnancy Pilates class, so hopefully I'll meet some people there. :-)

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest matt n mel

    Hi Blossom, I've been following this thread with avid interest! I'm also a first time mum, due 2nd October, 37 years old, living in Adelaide for last 2 years nearly. Would be really interested to know how you get on with your pilates, as I've been thinking about some kind of yoga type activity (feels like my body has doubled in age in last 18 weeks!) and could do with something, but I don't know what. Good luck to you, hope you're keeping well x

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Those hammocks look pretty cool. I think we are going to go for an enclosed bassinet to start with though. We shut the cats out of the bedroom this morning. Within 10 minutes they had managed to open two doors.

    I figured we would just put baby in their own room from the off where the cats can't get, but partner thinks baby should be with us. Apparently the SIDS guidelines say they should be in your room for the first 6-12 months.

     

    They do recommended having baby in with you for those early months.

     

    Personally I never felt able to leave my baby in another room in those early weeks/months and wanted him close by. I know a few women who put their babies into another room when babies were ranging from about 6 weeks upwards but usual practice (in my experience) talking to other mums seems to be to have them sleep in their room with them.

    Edited by snifter

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    They do recommended having baby in with you for those early months.

     

    Personally I never felt able to leave my baby in another room in those early weeks/months and wanted him close by. I know a few women who put their babies into another room when babies were ranging from about 6 weeks upwards but usual practice (in my experience) talking to other mums seems to be to have them sleep in their room with them.[/QUOTE]

     

    Sorry Snifter, but I'm afraid I'm going to have to respectfully disagree with you on that one. I think the fact that most of the mums you have spoken to have slept in the room with the baby is more a reflection on the circles you move in than what all mums do. The circles I move in are full of mums who have put babies in their own room straight away or at only a few weeks old. And my kids are 12 and 9 so not that much different in age to yours.

     

    Blossom, what ever you decide to do will be okay. If you want baby in with you for 2 years that is fine, or if you decide to put baby in it's own room from the word go that is also fine. If you decide to breastfeed then having the baby in with you makes night time feeds much easier but if you are bottle feeding then it doesn't make any difference really as you would have to get up to get the bottle ready anyways. What ever type of parent you are you will find plenty of literature to back you up (along with plenty to condemn you). There is no right or wrong way to look after a baby, just as long as you are looking after it.

    Edited by snifter

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    There is no right or wrong way to look after a baby, just as long as you are looking after it.

     

    Here! here!

    Wish I'd known someone like you when I had my little one! How refreshing! :)

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest Guest12727
    Hey Blossom on the subject of sleeping babies - I read this and thought of you :P

     

    http://stolensleep.com/2013/12/11/how-to-get-your-baby-to-go-to-sleep-and-stay-asleep-when-they-do-not-want-to-be-asleep/

     

    Very funny. Very much like the nightly fight we have with the cat and dog - one wants to go out, just back to sleep, the other wants to go out, the first comes in, just back to sleep, other wants to come in - it is worse than a baby.

     

    In fact, mine slept through the night from 2 months and has slept well always. The only time I was ever up to him was when he was sick - and that hasn't been often. BTW, slept in own room from day 1 - I did say in an earlier post I wasn't very maternal. :err:

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Sorry Snifter, but I'm afraid I'm going to have to respectfully disagree with you on that one. I think the fact that most of the mums you have spoken to have slept in the room with the baby is more a reflection on the circles you move in than what all mums do. The circles I move in are full of mums who have put babies in their own room straight away or at only a few weeks old. And my kids are 12 and 9 so not that much different in age to yours.

     

    Blossom, what ever you decide to do will be okay. If you want baby in with you for 2 years that is fine, or if you decide to put baby in it's own room from the word go that is also fine. If you decide to breastfeed then having the baby in with you makes night time feeds much easier but if you are bottle feeding then it doesn't make any difference really as you would have to get up to get the bottle ready anyways. What ever type of parent you are you will find plenty of literature to back you up (along with plenty to condemn you). There is no right or wrong way to look after a baby, just as long as you are looking after it.

     

    I'm not disagreeing with you NicF. As I said, it was my personal experience when my son was a baby. I don't know what this 'circle' I am supposed to have been moving in is all about either. I had no friends who had babies around the time I did (nor any friends living locally either) and simply went to ante natal and then post natal groups in my local village and the nearby town. I seem to recall in my ante natal I was the oldest mum to be by 10 years and older than the youngest mum to be by almost 20 years, a varying group of people. The Mums I met came from all walks of life and backgrounds I'd think. I don't know much about them, I never really got past talking to them at the baby groups about baby stuff really.

     

    I wasn't telling Blossom what she should or should not do, just sharing a couple of my experiences. I am sure she'll do what feels right to her when the time comes, I never was intending to come across otherwise, so Blossom if that was the case I apologise. I'm also going to step out of this conversation now.

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Sorry Snifter, was probably coming over a bit harsh on you and didn't mean to really. I had a really hard time with my first because I felt I should be doing everything a particular way that went against everything I am as a person and I thought if I didn't do it that way my baby would suffer. Even though they weren't meant to be criticisms of my parenting style it was comments like yours that used to make me feel really inferior and like I was a bad mum. By the time I got to my second child I realised that being happy and comfortable in the way I am as a mum was more important than doing things the way everyone else is. Although by that time I had moved areas and everyone else this time was more like my natural parenting style anyway, which also made a huge difference.

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Create an account or sign in to comment

    You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

    Create an account

    Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

    Register a new account

    Sign in

    Already have an account? Sign in here.

    Sign In Now