soo_the_panda

Healthcare whilst on holidays in the UK?

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    Hi all, I've googled a lot and talked to my GP here but haven't found a straight answer yet - what are UK and Aus citiziens, residing in Aus, entitled to in terms of healthcare whilst in the UK?

     

    I need to arrange a common procedure whilst I'm over there for 2 months over Christmas. Can I still access general NHS through my 'old' GP/local hospital or would I need to go private?

     

    I know there's currently talk of changing expat entitlements to the NHS but wondered if anyone has recent experience?

     

    Thanks

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    We were in UK last year and my husband (Aust Citizen)fell ill, had many visits to the local dr and ended up in hospital.

    We had to take his passport, Australian, to the local practice and they registered him as a temp patient from overseas.

    Under the reciprocal agreement, he was seen as often as necessary by all medical staff and was sent to the Hospital under their auspices.

    Excellent treatment at the regional Hospital and he was fixed and sent back to my sisters.

    We did have travel insurance, which would have paid had we been charged, but we were treated as well as any permanent residents would be, maybe better.

    I think the reciprocal agreement covers any treatment which is classed as emergency, that is, has to be dealt with. Not elective surgery or procedures.

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    Guest Claire-n-tel

    Yep emergencies only nothing elective.......you would not be entitled to arrange a common procedure and be covered by the NHS. That is presuming that you are permeant residents of Aus.

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    IIRC you are not considered as habitually resident as you re living in Aus now so will only be entitled to reciprocal care, ie emergency treatment and so on. You should not still be registered with a UK GP once you move from the UK or even move from one area to elsewhere in the UK. Within the UK you should change GP to the new area you move to as each GP practice covers a certain area and has budget allocated to it from that area/health authority etc. Usually you notify them you are moving overseas and they take you off their list. If reutrning to live permanetly you register again and files are on hand through the NHS number. Also your address does not tally correctly with the system anymore. Post etc from a UK GP will not get to you.

     

    I'd expect to go private although if you play the system chances are you'll get it done for free.

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    Guest Claire-n-tel
    I'd expect to go private although if you play the system chances are you'll get it done for free.

     

    WOW! That is awful!......firstly if it is something elective there is no way to "play the system" other than outright lie about you address, also why on earth should anyone expect to be entitled to elective NHS treatment when we don't live there, work there or pay taxes there?

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    Thanks everyone for your replies. I did think it would be emergency procedures only that would be covered.

     

    And thanks for the reminder - I should inform the GP surgery that I'm no longer in the country (never did this as didn't 'intend to emigrate' - so didn't really have a 'to do list' of similar items to do 'before I go'). I am very happy to pay (and expect to seeing as I haven't paid tax there in some time) but wondered if - as someone with a medical history in the UK system, rather than a 'normal tourist' - whether I should still use my 'old' GP there as a first contact or just call the hospital I imagine I'd need to go to and book in. My GP here suggested calling the GP I used to see in the UK as a first point of contact but maybe I should go direct to a private practice and book in.

     

    Thanks everyone for your advice.

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    WOW! That is awful!......firstly if it is something elective there is no way to "play the system" other than outright lie about you address, also why on earth should anyone expect to be entitled to elective NHS treatment when we don't live there, work there or pay taxes there?

     

    I didn't say it was ok or to do it. I was simply pointing out that if someone ('you' = anyone, as it was intended as an in general paragraph observation) plays the system, the chances are it happens. I hear time and again of people doing such things. I am sure the OP is a decent person who will pay privately, but many do not pay private and do play the system. Yeah, I could have worded it better, but then you could ease off with the passing judgement.

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    I didn't say it was ok or to do it. I was simply pointing out that if someone ('you' = anyone, as it was intended as an in general paragraph observation) plays the system, the chances are it happens. I hear time and again of people doing such things. I am sure the OP is a decent person who will pay privately, but many do not pay private and do play the system. Yeah, I could have worded it better, but then you could ease off with the passing judgement.

     

    I've been pulled up about that too snifter, so now I am conscious of (all posh like) putting "one" instead of "you".

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    We were in UK last year and my husband (Aust Citizen)fell ill, had many visits to the local dr and ended up in hospital.

    We had to take his passport, Australian, to the local practice and they registered him as a temp patient from overseas.

    Under the reciprocal agreement, he was seen as often as necessary by all medical staff and was sent to the Hospital under their auspices.

    Excellent treatment at the regional Hospital and he was fixed and sent back to my sisters.

    We did have travel insurance, which would have paid had we been charged, but we were treated as well as any permanent residents would be, maybe better.

    I think the reciprocal agreement covers any treatment which is classed as emergency, that is, has to be dealt with. Not elective surgery or procedures.

     

    Yeo, that's about spot on there cliffy, same as my wife, and on more than one occasion on trips back to UK.

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