soo_the_panda

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  1. Yes there are no regulations against this in SA - you aren't obliged to take a property until you've been offered and signed a rental agreement. You can therefore apply for as many as you like.
  2. Adelaide or Melbourne

    A few thoughts from me... - Melbourne has so many more job opportunities (in general, I know very little about your fields of work, expect a midwife friend - a new graduate - moved to Melbourne after not finding work in Adelaide post graduation, near the top of her class. There were just way more students than vacancies. May not be the case for experienced midwives.) - Houses are much more expensive in Melbourne. Salaries don't seem to be significantly more - eg there is no equivalent 'London weighting.' You may earn a bit more, but in my mind, not nearly enough to justify the expensive real estate there. - Adelaide is comparable to a big town in the UK. Melbourne feels to me like a 'real city.' I love both! - Glenelg and Brighton are both lovely and offer the lifestyle you describe. Glenelg is much bigger in terms of number of shops, restaurants, pubs etc. The main roads in both suburbs are called Jetty Road. But Jetty Road, Glenelg, and its surrounding streets (plus the marina and Moseley Square) are home to a far greater number of shops, cafes etc than the comparatively small stretch at Brighton. Brighton is less touristy - Agree with Snifter - 750-850 will get you a lovely 4 bed home with pool in many suburbs, but might be pushing it for Glenelg or Brighton. But you could also look at the slightly cheaper suburbs around those areas, depending how bothered you are about walking to the beach/cafes/shops. For example, West of Brighton road (not beach side) in Brighton is a lot cheaper than Brighton near the beach, also consider suburbs such as Seacliff, South Brighton, Hove. Or even a suburb or two further out - eg Dover Gardens, Seaview Downs (near Brighton but not walkable to beach) would get you a significantly better house. Depends what you want to compromise on. You could also look around Glenelg at Glengowrie, Glenelg North, Warradale - all a bit cheaper than Glenelg or Glenelg South. - The evenings are not long and light like English summers! That's one of the things I really miss about the UK. In fact, I'm heading over for a holiday next month and can't wait to sit out late with a glass of pimms in a lovely English country pub beer garden! Good luck!
  3. North Adelaide, Croydon or somewhere else?

    North Adelaide would be great, so would Croydon. However they are quite different. Croydon is a much smaller area with a different feel. It's a very arty area - very 'up and coming' with some hipster cafes, retro furniture stores etc popping up. However the small strip of shops is a small one. North Adelaide is more comparable to a small town centre in the UK with two main streets of shops (O'Connell and Melbourne) and many more restaurants, pubs, etc. It is also a more 'prestigious' area for want of a better word. Lots of old money. Big grand houses etc. I really like both, but they have a very different feel. I agree North Adelaide is better for choice of shops, cafes etc and to be able to walk into the city itself. And I agree with Snifter - also consider the city centre itself. In fact I think that's a better option than North Adelaide and Croydon, but would add some time to your partner's commute north. Have you also considered Prospect? It is probably in the middle of Croydon and North Adelaide in terms of both size and 'feel'. However please note it's one of those areas where the exact street can make a huge difference. Eg some areas (and prices, accordingly), generally the Southern end closer to North Adelaide are much nicer than the areas close to Churchill Road in the West and Kilburn in the North. But definitely worth looking at. Buses go regularly down Churchill Road and Prospect Road, or if you're towards the north end, can get the train from Kilburn.
  4. Travel insurance - for UK trip

    Thanks, both. No, I'm not surprised... I didn't think there was any easy way of avoiding paying the normal way - but wanted to check. Good point re car hire (not car hitting - ha!) yes, definitely worth doing it that way than the obscene amount that the car rental agencies charge. Thank you both for your replies
  5. Travel insurance - for UK trip

    Hi. Wondered what people generally do re. travel insurance when returning to the UK for holidays/to visit family? I am British and now also an Australian citizen. My partner is Australian. Our daughter has an Australian passport, was born here, but dual citizen as I am British. I have always just purchased an annual travel insurance policy, but ours is currently out of date. We don't have any other big trips planned this year, so wondering about purchasing cover just for a trip this year which is 3 weeks in the UK visiting family and 2 weeks in France. Presumably I am covered for medical issues in the UK and I wouldn't need to be insured for spending time in the UK in my parents' home... but obviously want to be covered for any flight issues / trip cancellation / luggage loss. Or is there no way to separate these, and we need just to buy general travel insurance cover, just as any Australian family would when visiting the UK? Thanks in advance for any advice!
  6. Brighton and surrounding suburbs

    Hi Luke. Brighton is a lovely area and well regarded in general (house prices reflect this). Hove and North Brighton also great. You will notice a difference in house prices, with more expensive houses in these suburbs west of Brighton Road (ie closer to the beach) with comparatively less expensive options on Brighton Road and east of Brighton Road. Warradale is mainly new homes and generally well regarded. Oaklands Park is a bit of a mixed bag - one of those suburbs with some really quite nice roads and then some I really wouldn't want to live on (Westfield Marion is one of Adelaide's main shopping malls and is in Oaklands Park - there are some 'not so nice' areas immediately surrounding the centre) but still not a bad suburb overall. With a young family, you might want to look at school zones in these areas if you are planning on public schooling. Brighton Secondary School is very popular and ranks highly - accordingly it is zoned so that may influence where you want to settle (although high school is a long way off - if you are wanting to buy with a term to staying put long term, it may be worth checking the zone). There are lots of good and popular primary schools in the area too - Glenelg, Paringa Park (in Somerton Park - this has a very small zone of just Somerton Park and North Brighton I believe), Brighton and Seacliff. Warradale Primary I have also heard is good.
  7. Living costs

    http://www.bobinoz.com/blog/category/cost-of-living-in-australia/ is a useful site with some articles you may wish to read. As has been said, and I'm sure you appreciate, these costs can really vary from household to household. To give you a starting point, we pay $60 a month for unlimited 'naked' internet $45 a month for a 'bring your own' sim mobile plan with Amaysim, with unlimited calls and text in Aus and 7GB data and unlimited calls and texts to UK About $550 a year to insure me and partner to drive our 3 year old SUV, bought brand new Council rates vary on size of land and which council area it is. We pay about $1200 a year for a large apartment in city of holdfast bay. Electricity we budget for around $500 a quarter but this can vary wildly depending on size of home, usage, if you have solar, type of plan you have, etc. Gas honestly can't think what we pay, a lot less than electricity Water we pay about $200 a quarter. Other costs you may not have thought of as I'm not sure if they apply in the UK (I didn't own my own home there) are an emergency services levy for home owners - about $250 a year for us and it seems more people have health insurance here than in the UK. I find electricity and groceries are the biggest costs compared to the UK, with petrol being the biggest saving. Overall I think it balances out and previous posters are correct you cannot compare to pounds as hopefully your salary is a lot higher here than if you were to convert it to the UK equivalent. Agree, do an online food shop on woolworths or coles online to check out what your average shop might be. But once here Aldi is much cheaper for basics and local fruit and veg shops and the markets can be much cheaper for produce. Many people also use discount places (like the Pound shop!) like The Reject Shop and Cheap as Chips for toiletries, cleaning products etc. It's less of a 'one shop buys all' mentality here, though I'm sure many still do just one big supermarket shop. I just make more effort to shop around here as groceries is one of our biggest expenses.
  8. Baby info needed, please

    LOL in response to your first questions - not with the greatest of ease! Up and over through the middle of the straps has been my experience.. not easy with a little sleeping baby, and now also not easy with a toddler who is still too little to turn around to forward-facing. I think Baby Bunting is the biggest selection I know of... I was very overwhelmed when we went to the South Road store. I know there are a few baby shops in/around the city - one on Grote Street (Your Child's Nursery maybe?) and some around the Norwood area. Not sure if any of them are any good or better than what you've already seen.
  9. Advice on where to start looking at Suburbs

    I second all of what has already been said, and agree Adelaide is very much a place where driving everywhere is the norm. However, there are some small pockets where driving everywhere isn't a necessity, but not many - and not many of these are in the east or south (I would suggest central areas of Glenelg, Norwood, North Adelaide, Adelaide itself, Goodwood, Henley Beach, Semaphore). I have lived in Glenelg with no car for 2.5 years and currently share one car with my partner - and Glenelg is one of the few areas we really can walk/easily use public transport to do a lot of what we want to do. There's not many suburbs in Adelaide we'd manage the same level of convenience as a one/no car family. Also - it'd be great if you could learn more about what's meant by 'south' and 'east' - east could either mean eastern suburbs close to the city (eg Norwood, Magill, Rose Park etc) or the foothills and hills themselves. So we could be talking walking distance to the city up to fairly rural in the Adelaide Hills. Also, some would consider Brighton a Southern suburb, whereas I consider that metro south-west, and to me consider the 'proper' southern suburbs to be Hallett Cove and further south to Noarlunga, Seaford etc where a lot of English ex-pats settle. Knowing where you need to be near, and refining your budget, would both really help us give suggestions.
  10. Advice on where to start looking at Suburbs

    If you're completely dependent on public transport, the only areas I would really consider would be Glenelg, Norwood, Adelaide, North Adelaide and perhaps Henley Beach or Goodwood to some extent. However, none of those areas are cheap, but a unit could be affordable. All of the above have amenities within walking distance and good public transport links (I lived in Glenelg for 2.5 years without a car, and still live in Glenelg and share a car with my partner).
  11. Port Pirie anyone?

    I used to travel to Pirie fairly frequently for work. My personal opinion would be don't do it!! Whilst it may be 'snooty' I would never consider living there unless it was for a very short term contract and/or my visa depended on it or similar. It is a small place by most British people's standards - I would describe it as a 'small town'. Things that would really put me off: - Distance from Adelaide - I would happily live somewhere with a more rural outlook, but wouldn't want to be further out than you could travel eg for a good restaurant, theatre, special event, see friends etc. Pirie is definitely past this point! - Culture of small country towns in Australia - wouldn't suit me as I'm not at all interested in sport and I think I'd find it hard to find things to do / things to talk about as the culture is very focused around football, netball etc. If you and kids are really into sport then it'd be totally different as I imagine playing / watching sport would take up a lot of your weekend. - Way too far from the beach! For me I love the beach and being close was a big factor in where I chose to live. - Can't imagine what I'd spend my time doing outside of work - I don't think there would be much on socially (again, unless you're into sport and therefore local pub and playing watching / sport would be a suitable social life). - Honestly - and I'm sure some will frown upon this or call me snooty, but you asked for opinions - I think the place is a bit of a dump. Definitely a place we would drive through and say 'urgh, imagine having to live here.' Definitely drive up one weekend and see it before making a decision! For me an afternoon would be enough to exhaust all recreational possibilities. However - what one person loves another hates - so we could give you 20 opinions here but only you could decide if Port Pirie is paradise or your idea of hell or anything in between.
  12. Casual Childcare...Options?

    Hi, someone I work with uses the childcare centre that's situated upstairs within the Westfield Marion building, near the Child & Youth Health centre. I'm not sure of the name, but she has used it on a casual basis and has been happy with the care.
  13. Looking for a job

    I second Entrée as a great agency for marketing - also try Hudson. My other advice - Call, don't email agencies and when asking questions about a role - Always call to introduce yourself - don't just press submit on an application. Have a couple of smart questions to ask that could lead to a short conversation. - Make it really really obvious you have citizenship on your resume - eg a summary line at the top eg 'Marketing professional and MBA holder, recently relocated to Adelaide (Australian citizen) after XX years working in the UK and XXX. Looking for permanent opportunities in XXX or XXX' - obviously more carefully written than that, but make it really obvious - There are lots of roles here that are quite broad - eg in marketing and comms, events and community engagement, events and volunteer coordination etc. Make it obvious you can do all of those things. - There aren't many big national organisations here, so consider universities, government and the not for profit sector.
  14. Best Internet Provider for Glenelg East?

    Hi, we use iiNet in Glenelg and have never experienced any significant buffering whilst watching Netflix and facetime/Skype using the same network are very clear.
  15. Cheaper Flights?

    Yes, at the weekend we booked flights Adelaide - Heathrow return for next August, $1515 per adult on Emirates. Price was consistent for almost every day in August, with Friday night being $40 or so more. Very pleased with those! Qatar prices were comparable, but we opted for Emirates for a lunchtime departure out of London - Qatar leave much earlier which would require a pre-dawn wake up to travel to Heathrow.